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ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



BAIiTIMORE, 1838. 



iialtCmore: 

PRINTED BY SAMUEL SANDS 
N- W corner of Baltimore & North-sts. 

1838. 



CIRCULAR 



The Session of the Medical Department of this Insti- 
tution will commence on the last Monday of October 
next, and continue until the last day of February. 

THE FACULTY OF PHYSIC, are: 

H. WILLIS BAXLEY, M. D. 

Professor of Anatomy and Physiology. 

HENRY HOWARD, M. D. 

Professor of Obstetrics and of the Diseases of Women 
and Children. 

MICHAEL A. FINLEY, M. D. 

Professor of Pathology and of the Practice of Medicine, 
ROBERT E. DORSEY, M. D. 

Professor of Materia Mcdica, Therapeutics, Hygiene, 
and Medical Jurisprudence. 

WILLIAM R. FISHER, M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

JOHN FREDERICK MAY, M. D. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery. 



In making this annual announcement, the Trustees state 
that, in addition to a Medical Faculty of great ability, 
having high claims to public confidence and patronage, the 
University of Maryland offers other and peculiar advan- 
tages to students for the acquisition of medical knowledge. 
Placed in the most favorable climate for dissection, pos- 
sessing commodious rooms for that purpose, the Universi- 
ty of Maryland commands an unequalled supply of Ma- 
teriel for the prosecution of the study of Practical Anato- 
my. Such, indeed, is the abundance of Subjects, that the 
Professor of Surgery will afford to the Students an op- 
portunity of performing themselves, under his direction, 
every surgical operation. 

In teaching Practical Obstetrics, the deceptive manikin 
in common use in our medical schools is discarded, and 
the improved phantome, with the elastic foetal head of the 
ingenious Hebermelh, is adopted. After performing the 
manual and instrumental operations, and explaining their 
mechanism to the class, the Professor affords each student 
the opportunity to repeat every operation under his in- 
spection and instruction. 

The great practical advantages thus afforded to the 
student by the Professors of Surgery and Obstetrics — 
hitherto not provided at any of our medical schools — will 
qualify the graduate to compete successful, in these 
branches, wdth practitioners of considerable experience. 

This University has an Anatomical Museum, founded 
on the extensive collection of the celebrated Allen Burns, 
which became its property by purchase, at great expense ; 



and to this collection numerous additions have been annu- 
ally made ; and of late, many very valuable preparations 
have been procured from France and Italy ; which, to- 
gether, aftbrd ample means for a great variety of illustra- 
tions of healthy and diseased structure. 

The Baltimore Infirmary, long and favorably 
known as an excellent school of practice, forms a part 
of the Medical Department, and furnishes every class of 
disease for the practical elucidation of the principles 
taught by the Professors of the Practice of Medicine and 
of Surgery ; who, besides their regular lectures, impart 
Clinical instruction at the Infirmary at stated periods, in 
each week, during the session. 

The Chemical and Philosophical apparatus of this 
University is of great extent and value, much of it having 
been selected in Europe by the late distinguished Pro- 
fessor Debutts. And to a Laboratory, provided with 
everything necessary for a course of Chemical Instruction, 
are united the numerous and varied articles required to 
illustrate the lectures on Pharmacy and Materia Medica. 
Neither expense nor care has been spared to secure for 
the University of Maryland, the facilities necessary for 
the acquisition of a thorough Medical Education. 

On Saturday of every week, each Professor devotes 
one hour to the examination of his class, on all the lec- 
tures of the week — which, by familiarizing the student 
with examinations — correcting errors he may have imbib- 
ed — and directing his attention to important points that 
must be explained by him when he presents himself for 



graduation — is found, by the experience of the last ses- 
sion, to prepare the student to answer with remarkable 
composure, promptness and intelligence, on his final ex- 
amination. 



THE EXPENSES are: 

Tlie First Coiuse. 

For attending the lectures of six Professors, 



each, $15, 




$90 


For attending the Dissector and Demonstrator 






and Matriculation, 




8 


For attending the Clinical Lectures and in- 






struction at the Infirmary, 




5 


• 




$103 


The Second Course. 






For attendance on the lectures of six Pro- 






fessors, .... 


$90 




For Graduation and Diploma, 


20 


110 



The whole cost of the two Courses and Gradu- 
ation being only . . . $213 
But students who have attended one course of lectures, 
in another respectable medical school, may graduate here 
after they have attended one full course in this University, 
where the course of instruction is as complete as that of 
any other medical school, each Professor being, in this 
institution, required to lecture five times a week ; and 



where, from the facility with whicli Suhjects are procu- 
red, Dissections can be prosecuted with more ease, and 
at less expense, than at any other place : liere, too, good 
boarding- can be obtained on as cheap terms as in any 
Atlantic city. 



THE OFFICERS are: 

His Excellency, THOiMAS W. VEAZY, 

(Governor of Maryland,) President of Board of Trustees. 
NATHANIEL F. WILLIAMS, Vice President. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

JOHN NELSON, Dr. HANSON PENN, 

SOLOMON ETTING, JAMES WM. MeCULLOH, 

Dr. DENNIS CLAUDE, Dr. SAMUEL MeCULLOH, 

JAMES COX, JOHN G. CHAPMAN, 

WILLIAM GWYNN, WILLIAM SCHLEY. 

By order, 

JOSEPH B. WILLIAMS, Sec'ry, 

Baltimore, 1838. 



CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



REGENTS' MEDICAL FACULTY 



UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND, 



ik 



CIRCULAR 



REGENTS' MEDICAL FACULTY 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



The Faculty of Physic in the University of Maryland 
{under the Board of Regents) on the present occasion address 
themselves to the early friends and alumni of this institution, 
with peculiar claims to their patronage and support. 

The public need scarcely be told that the Medical School 
of the University of Maryland owes its origin to the private 
enterprise and industry of its professors. By their toil, their 
talent, and the liberal appropriation of their pecuniary means 
it was fostered and maintained, until it became an honour to 
its projectors, the pride of the State, and abundantly useful to 
the public. More than three hundred pupils annually fre- 
quented its halls, and it vied with the most flourishing 
institutions of our country. Thus far the Medical Faculty 
governed the school, and although differences of opinion 
necessarily arose yet nothing occurred to mar its prosperity. 

At length a disaffected minority of the Faculty displeased 
with an act of that body, in an evil hour applied to the legis- 
lature of Maryland to modify the government of the school. 
Although the charter previously granted was perpetual and 
immutable, yet the legislature not properly considering the 
unconstitutionality of the act, granted* the petition, and wrest- 
ing the government from the hands of those who had brought 
the school into existence, placed it wholly in the hands of a 
Board of Trustees, not even leaving to the professors the power 
of controlling their own pupils. They were no longer allowed 



the slightest influence in filling vacant chairs, or in those 
arrangements which can only be properly made by those who 
are most deeply interested in the success of such an institu- 
tion, and who are rendered competent by the experience 
which the duties of a professor can alone give. 

For a time the Faculty were constrained to acquiesce, 
flattering themselves that the evils dreaded might never arise. 
The Faculty can never forget that in the Board of Trustees 
thus appointed, were many members incapable of being influ- 
enced by any other motive than a regard to the interests of the 
institution which they governed ; but in so numerous a body 
it was to be expected that some should be embraced to whom 
power would be desirable, and who would be tempted to use 
the patronage which they enjoyed for the accomplishment of 
their private ends. 

From this time even the advice of the Faculty ceased to be 
sought or regarded, and, in spite of their repeated remonstran- 
ces, a series of measures were adopted which at once thwarted 
the zealous endeavours of the Faculty in advancing the 
institution. They had perpetually before them the discou- 
raging appre"hension, that toil as they might, the fruits of their 
labours were liable at any moment to be completely blasted 
by a single unadvised act of the Trustees. These apprehen- 
sions were abundantly realized by the adoption of measures 
(without even the privity of the Faculty) which alienated the 
patrons of the institution. 

The opposition of the Faculty to the measures of the Board 
excited ill feeling, and a hostile attitude was assumed. Among 
other offensive acts, the Trustees passed a resolution, that any 
professor who should speak disrespectfully of the Trustees 
should be expelled from his chair. The Faculty have abun- 
dant reason to believe that numbers of that body openly 
declared their determination to persecute the professors out 
of their chairs. 

The institution of course declined ; its pupils repaired to 
other schools ; the eminent professor of the materia medica 
withdrew ; and soon after the no less distinguished Professor 
of Anatomy retired in open disgust. At length the Faculty, 
after an ineffectual appeal to the Legislature, and after there 
had been made by the Board an appointment against which 



^rery professor in vain remonstrated, unanimously rosigned 
the places which had been conferred by the Trustees. 

The chairs in which the professors recently laboured are 
now occupied by strangers, having in vain been offered to 
almost every prominent medical man in Baltimore, and to 
many in other places ; but it remains to be seen whether the 
Trustees can bestow upon them the reputation and public 
patronage for which some of the late incumbents have expend- 
ed the best part of their lives, and no small portion of their 
fortunes. 

But in relinquishing place under the Trustees, the Faculty 
have not abandoned their rights. Under the original charter 
which no Legislature had power to rescind, they are still the 
Professors of the University of Maryland, and the government 
of the Trustees is a usurpation. This declaration is sus- 
tained by the ablest legal counsel in the land, and will be 
maintained before the proper tribunal. 

The annual course by the Faculty of Physic will therefore 
be given as usual, and certainly they never entered upon 
their duties with more powerful incentives to exertion. Neither 
labour nor expense will be spared in rendering their course 
complete and satisfactory. Convenient apartments for the 
course will be procured. Arrangements have been made by 
which clinical instruction will be given as heretofore. 



Under the sanction of the Regents of the University of 
Maryland, acting by virtue of their perpetual Charter of 
1812, sustained by the opinion of eminent counsel, the 
Faculty of Physic will commence their Lectures for the 
Term of 1S3T-8, on the last Monday of October next. 

NATHANIEL POTTER, M. D. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine. 

RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D. 

Obstetrics, Hygiene, and Medical Jurisprudence. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

Anatomy and Surgery.- 

SAMUEL G. BAKER, M. D. 
Materia Medica and Tlierapeutics. 
Od" The chair of Chemistry will be filled in a few days. 

Degrees of Medicine will be conferred in the month of 
March. 

RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D. 

Deon of the Faculty. 



G 

Baltimore, September 20, 1837. 
TO THE FACULTY OF PHYSIC : 

Gentleme;n : — In pursuance of a resolution of the Regents of 
the University of Maryland, at a meeting on the 18th instant, we have 
requested the opinion of counsel upon your inquiry : 

Whether you may, as the Legitimate Faculty of Physic of the 
University of Maryland, Lecture as Professors in that Faculty, and 
confer degrees in Medicine ? 

We have obtained the opinion of the counsel selected by us : 
Messrs. Martin, Mayer, and Evans, and now enclose it. We beg 
leave to add that we entirely concur in that opinion ; being decidedly 
of the belief, that the acts of 1807, chap. 53, and 1812, chap. 159, are 
in force, unaffected by the act of 1825, chap. 190, appointing Trus- 
tees, &c. We are very respectfully, your obedient serv'ts, 

George Winchester.^ ,^ 7, r 
■Ti TT I faculty oj 

JjAviD Hoffman, >- r 

Wm. W. Hall, J ^««'- 

To Richard Wilmot Hall, M. D. 
Dean of the Faculty. 



Baltimore, September 20, 1837. 
Gentlemen: — We have examined the several acts of Assembly 
relating to the College of Medicine and the University of Maryland, 
with a view to the answer to the question submitted to us by the 
Faculty of Law, and for your information, whether, under the auspices 
of the acts of Assembly of 1807, chap. 53, and 1812^ chap. 159, you 
may proceed to deliver Lectures and confer Degrees in Medicine. 
We regard you as by due succession, the Faculty of Physic recog- 
nized by those acts of Assembly : We consider the Act of 1825, chap. 
190, a NULLITY, as it aims to divest chartered rights : and we there- 
fore are of opinion, that the Acts of 1807 and 1812 are in full force, 
and constitute your ample and effectual sanction for delivering lectures 
and conferring degrees in Medicine. W^e are, gentlemen, most 
respectfully, yours, R. N. Martin, 

Charles F. Mayer, 
Hugh Davey Evans. 
Dr. Richard Wilmot Hall, M. D. 

Dean of the Faculty of Physic in the University of Maryland. 



OPINION OF COUNSEL— Given May 2Ist, 1826. 

In the year 1807, the Legislature of IMaryland, on the application 
of a number of physicians in the city of Baltimore, passed an act for 
founding a medical college in the said city, or its precincts, for the 
instruction of students in the different branches of medicine, and con- 
stituted it a body politic, by the name of the 'Regents of the College 
of Medicine of Maryland.' The corporation was vested with powers 
to take and receive real and personal property by purchase, devise, 



gift, &c. so that the annual value t] id not exceed thirty thousand dol- 
lars, exclusively of the lots and buildings that might be occupied by 
the college. 

Some short time after the corporation was organized, measures were 
taken to purchase a lot of ground in the vicinity of Baltimore, on 
which to erect the necessary buildings and improvements for the 
accommodation of the college, and the accomplishment of tlie objects 
of the institution. As the corporation itself possessed no funds, there 
being no endowment by the legislature of Maryland, nor any dona- 
tions by private benefactors, several of the Regents of the college, on 
their personal responsibility, contracted with Colonel Howard for the 
purchase of the ground on which the buildings were afterwards erect- 
ed, and proceeded to improve the property by means of loans princi- 
pally obtained on their individual credit. In the year ISl'i, a memo- 
rial was presented to the legislature of Maryland by the President and 
Professors of the said College of Medicine of Maryland, praying for 
an enlargement of the Medical College by annexing to it three other 
faculties, to wit : of divinity, of law, and of the arts and sciences ; and 
a law was accordingly passed, authorizing the annexation of the above 
faculties, and when so united, constituting them an university, by the 
title of the 'University of Maryland,' and to have a corporate existence 
by the name and style of the 'University of Maryland,' and to have a 
corporate existence by the name and style of 'The Regents of the 
University of Maryland.' The Regents were empowered to appoint 
a provost, and each of these faculties to choose its own professors and 
lecturers. After the passage of this last mentioned act, the Regents 
of the TTnivprsity, finding that the resources* of the corporation were 
inadequate to the completion of the buildings v;hich had been thus 
commenced by the College of Medicine, applied to the legislature for 
the permission to raise money for that purpose by means of lotteries, 
■which was accordingly granted to them ; but these lotteries, from the 
intervention of the late war, and other causes, not j)roving so produc- 
tiue as was anticipated, the regents were compelled to have recourse 
to other means to raise the requisite funds. Several members of the 
faculty of medicine procured the loan of a considerable sum of money 
from one of the banks of Baltimore, on their individual credit, and 
became liable to mechanics and others to a large amount for work and 
materials furnished in completing the buildings and improvements. 
Notwithstanding this partial relief, the debts of the corporation were 
found to be still large, and increasing, and it became necessary to seek 
some more eftectual aid in liquidating them. This was generously 
afforded by the legislature at December session. IS-il, in consequence 
of an application to them on behalf of tiie University, They enacted 
a law authorizing a stock to be constituted to the amount of thirty 
thousand dollars, bearing an interest ol" live per cent, redeemable at 
the expiration of thirty years, the state ouaranteeing the repayment of 
the principal, and the punctual discharge of the interest in the mean 
time. The state, however, required that the interest on the loan 
should be paid by the Medical professors of the University, and that 
the Treasurer of the State should take a bond to be annually given by 



the said professors, conditioned lor the payment of the yearly interest. 
And one of which bonds is now held by the Treasurer for the pay- 
ment of the interest accruing the present year. 

By an act passed at the last session of the legislature of Maryland, 
entitled, 'An act supplementary to an act for founding an University,' 
&tc. several important and fundamental alterations have been made 
in the original act, which change the entire government and discipline 
of the University, and that too, without the approbation or assent of 
the University itself. By one of its provisions, the board of Regents, 
and the members of its several faculties, are discontinued and abolish- 
ed. By another provision of the same act, certain gentlemen therein 
named are appointed trustees, and are vested with all the powers and 
privileges, and subject to tlie duties (not abolished by the said act) 
which are imposed upon the Regents of the University. The said trus- 
tees are further authorized to appoint and dismiss the provost, profes- 
sors, and lecturers, at pleasure ; and in case of a vacancy in any one of 
the professorships of either of the branches^ the remaining professors 
of that faculty have the privilege of nominating two persons to fill 
such vacancy, but the trustees are not bound to accept either of the 
persons so nominated. 

All the rights of property now possessed by the Regents, are de- 
clared to be vested in, and belong to, the said trustees ; but the medi- 
cal professors are to remain answerable for the payment of the inte- 
rest on the loan of $30,000 as required by the above mentioned act 
of 1821. 

After a careful and deliberate consideration of the preceding state- 
ment, we have no hesitation in giving it as our decided opinion, that 
the late act of assembly, transferring the whole power and authority 
granted by the original acts of incorporation to the Regents of the 
University, and the property which has since been acquired by them, 
to the trustees named in the late act, is a manifest violation of the 
rights created by the said original acts, and a direct infringement of 
that article of the Constitution of the United States which forbids any 
state from passing a law impairing the obligation of contracts. 

William Wirt, 
John Purviance. 

I concur, entirely, in opinion with the Attorney General and Mr. 
Purviance. The Regents of tiie University were authorized, by the 
grant of the legislature, to exercise certain privileges, and acquire and 
hold property. An act, intended to abolish those privileges, without 
forfeiture, and to transi'er that j)roperty to others, strikes me as being 
plainly repugnant to the grant itself, and therefore void, by the Consti- 
tution of the United Slates. Da.mel Webster^ 



To 

Member of the House of Delegates of Md. 



|CF*The following Circular was addressed to the public by the 
Regents' Faculty of the University of Maryland, at the commencement 
of their Lectures this winter. It is hoped that each member of the 
Senate and House of Delegates will give it an attentive perusal. The 
matter it contains is at this time of important interest, as it bears upon 
the propriety of repealing the act of 1825, which took the government f 



from the Board of Regents. 



•P' 



RC UL AR 

OF THE 

REGENTS' MEDICAL FACULTY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND. 



The faculty of Physic in the University of Maryland (under 
the Board of Regents) on the present occasion address them- 
selves to the early friends and alumni of this institution, with 
peculiar claims to their patronage and support. 

The public need scarcely be told that the Medical School 
of the University of Maryland owes its origin to the private 
enterprise and industry of its professors. By their toil, their 
talent, and the liberal appropriation of their pecuniary means 
it was fostered and maintained, until it became an honour to 
its projectors, the pride of the State, and abundantly useful to 
the public. More than three hundred pupils annually fre- 
quented its halls, and it vied with the most flourishing 
institutions of our country. Thus far the Medical Faculty 
governed the school, and although diflerences of opinion 
necessarily arose yet nothing occurred to mar its prosperity, 



'Y 



At length a disaffected minority of the Faculty, displeased 
with an act of that body, in an evil hour applied to the legis- 
lature of Maryland to modify the government of the school. 
Although the charter previously granted was perpetual and 
immutable, yet the legislature not properly considering the 
unconstitutionality of the act, granted the petition, and wrest- 
ing the government from the hands of those who had brought 
the school into existence, placed it wholly in the hands of a 
Board of Trustees, not even leaving to the professors the power 
of controlling their own pupils. They were no longer allowed 
the slightest influence in fiUing vacant chairs, or in those 
arrangements which can only be properly made by those who 
are most deeply interested in the success of such an institu- 
tion, and who are rendered competent by the experience 
which the duties of a professor can alone give. 

For a time the Faculty were constrained to acquiesce, 
flattering themselves that the evils dreaded might never arise. 
The Faculty can never forget that in tlmk Board of Trustees 
thus appointed, were many members incapable of being influ- 
enced by any other motive than a regard to the interests of the 
institution which they governed ; but in so numerous a body 
it was to be expected that some should be embraced to whom 
power would be desirable, and who would be tempted to use 
the patronage which they enjoyed for the accomplishment of 
their private ends. 

From this time even the advice of the Faculty ceased to be 
sought or regarded, and, in spite of their repeated remonstran- 
ces, a series of measures were adopted which at once thwarted 
the zealous endeavours of the Faculty in advancing the 
institution. They had perpetually before them the discou- 
raging apprehension, that toil as they might, the fruits of their 
labours were liable at any moment to be completely blasted 
by a single unadvised act of the Trustees. These apprehen- 
sions were abundantly realized by the adoption of measures 
(without even the privity of the Faculty) which alienated the ' 
patrons of the institution. 

The opposition of the Faculty to the measures of the Board 
excited ill feeling, and a hostile attitude was assumed. Among 
other oflensive acts, the Trustees passed a resolution, that any 
professor who should speak disrespectfully of the Trustees 



should be expelled from his chair. The faculty have abun- 
dant reason to believe that numbers of that body openly 
declared their determination to persecute the professors out 
of their chairs. 

The institution of course declined ; its pupils repaired to 
other schools ; the eminent professor of the materia medica 
withdrew; and soon after the no less distinguished Professor 
of Anatomy retired in open disgust. At length the Faculty, 
after an ineffectual appeal to the Legislature, and after there 
had been made by the Board an appointment against which 
■every professor in vain remonstrated, unanimously resigned 
the places which had been conferred by the Trustees. 

The chairs in which the professors recently laboured are 
now occupied by strangers, having in vain been offered to 
almost every prominent medical man in Baltimore, and to 
many in other places ; but it remains to be seen whether the 
Trustees can bestow upon them the reputation and public 
patronage for which some of the late incumbents have expend- 
ed the best part of their lives, and no small portion of their 
fortunes. 

But in relinquishing place under the Trustees, the Faculty 
have not abandoned their rights. Under the original charter 
which no Legislature had power to rescind, they are still the 
Professors of the University of Maryland, and the government 
of the Trustees is a usurpation. This declaration is sus- 
tained by the ablest legal counsel in the land, and will be 
maintained before the proper tribunal. 

The annual course by the Faculty of Physic will therefore 
be given as usual, and certainly they never entered upon their 
duties with more powerful incentives to exertion. Neither 
labour nor expense will be spared in rendering their course 
complete and satisfactory. Convenient apartments for the 
course will be procured. Arrangements have been made, by 
which cUnical instruction will be given as heretofore. 



Under the sanction of the Regents of the University of 
Maryland, acting by virtue of their perpetual Charter of 1812, 
sustained by the opinion of eminent counsel, the Faculty of 
Physic will commence their Lectures for the Term of 1837—8 
on the last Monday of October next. 

NATHANIEL POTTER, M. D. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine. 

RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D. 
Obstetrics, Hygiene, and Medical Jurisprudence. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

Anatomy and Surgery. 

SAMUEL G. BAKER, M. D. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

Chemistry and Phaimacy. 

Degrees of Medicine will be conferred in the month of 

March. 

RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D. 

Dean of the Faculty. 



Baltimore J September 20, 1837. 

TO THE FACULTY OF PHYSIC : 

Gentlemen : — In pursuance of a resolution of the Regents 
of the University of Maryland, at a meeting on the 18th instant, we 
have requested the opinion of counsel upon your inquiry : 

Whether you may, as the legitimate Faculty of Physic of the 
University of Maryland, lecture as Professors in that Faculty, and 
confer degrees in Medicine } 

We have obtained the opinion of the counsel selected by us : 
Messrs. Martin, Mayer, and Evans, and now enclose it. We beg 
leave to add that we entirely concur in that opinion ; being decidedly 
of the belief, that the acts of 1807, chap. 53, and 1812, chap. 159, are 
in force, unaffected by the act of 1825, chap. 190, appointing Trus- 
tees, &.C. We are very respectfully, your obedient serv'ts, 

George Winchester,^ Faculty of 
David Hoffman, > t 

Wm. W. Hall, J ^^"'• 

To Richard Wilmot Hall, M.D. 

Dean of the Faculty. 



Baltimore, September 20, 1837. 

Gentlemen : — We have examined the several acts of Assembly, 
relating to the College of Medicine and the University of Maryland, 
with a view to the answer to the question submitted to us by the 
Faculty of Law, and for your information, whether, under the auspices, 
of the acts of Assembly of 1807, chap. 53, and 1812, chap. 159, you 
may proceed to deliver Lectures and confer Degrees in Medicine. 
We regard you as by due succession, the Faculty of Physic recog- 
nized by those acts of Assembly : We consider the Act of 1825, ch. 
190, a NULLITY, as it aims to divest chartered rights : and we there- 
fore are of opinion, that the Acts of 1807 and 1812, are in full force, 
and constitute your ample and effectual sanction for delivering lectures 
and conferring degrees in Medicine. 

We are, gentlemen, most respectfully, yours, 

R. N. Martin, 
Charles F. Mayer, 
Hugh Davey Evans, 
Dr. Richard Wilmot Hall, M.D. 

Dean of the Faculty of Physic in the University of Maryland. 



Baltimore, May 22, 1826. 
To his Excellency the Governor of Maryland, and the gentlemen 
named as Trustees of the University of Maryland, in the law 
passed at the last Session of the General Assembly. 

Gentlemen: — At a meeting of the Regents of the University of Ma- 
ryland, held on the 17th of March last, the following resolutions were 
adopted : 

1st. Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed by ballot, to ob- 
tain the opinion of counsel as to the constitutionality of a law, passed at 
the late session of the Legislature of Maryland, entitled, ''^an Act supple- 
mentary to an act entitled, an Act for founding an University in the City 
or precincts of Baltimore, by the name of the University of Maryland." 

2d. Resolved, If counsel decide that said law is unconstitutional, the 
said committee of five be requested to prepare a respectful address to the 
Governor of the State of Maryland, and to the Trustees appointed for the 
government of the University by said law of the Legislature, informing 
them of the opinion thus obtained from counsel, and requesting them to 
defer acting until said law can be reconsidered by the Legislature. Should 
the Trustees, however, determine to act, this committee is empowered to 
adopt such legal measures as it may deem necessary to resist the opera- 
tions of said law. 

The undersigned having been regularly appointed a committee to carry 
the above resolutions into effect, have obtained the following 



OPINION OF COUNSEL. 

In the year 1807, the Legislature of Maryland, on ihe application of a 
taumber of Physicians in the City of Baltimore, passed an act for founding 
a Medical College in the said City, or its precincts, for the instruction of 
students in the diflferent branches of Medicine, and constituted it a body 
politic, by the name of the "Regents of the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land." The corporation was vested with powers to take and receive real 
and personal property by purchase, devise, gift, &c. so that the annual 
value did not exceed thirty thousand dollars, exclusively of the lots and 
buildings that might be occupied by the College. 

Some short time after the corporation was organized, measures were 
taken to purchase a lot of ground in the vicinity of Baltimore, on which 
to erect the necessary buildings and improvements for the accommodation 
of the College, and the accomplishment of the objects of the institution. 
As the corporation itself possessed no funds, there being no endowment 
by the Legislature of Maryland, nor any donations by private benefactors, 
several of the Regents of the College, on their personal responsibility, 
contracted with Colonel Howard, for the purchase of the ground, on 
which the buildings were afterwards erected, and proceeded to improve the 
property by means of loans principally obtained on their individual credit. 
In the year 1812, a memorial was presented to the Legislature of Mary- 
land, by the President and Professors of the said College of Medicine of 
Maryland, praying for an enlargement of the Medical College by annex- 
ing to it three other faculties, to wit : of Divinity, of Law, and of the 
Arts and Sciences; and a law was accordingly passed, authorizing the 
annexation of the above faculties, and when so united, constituting them 
an University, by the title of the "University of Maryland," and to have 
a corporate existence by the name and style of "The Regents of the 
University of Maryland." The Regents were empowered to appoint a 
Provost, and each of the faculties to choose its own Professors and Lec- 
turers. After the passage of this last mentioned act, the Regents of the 
University, finding that the resources of the corporation were inadequate 
to the completion of the buildings which had been thus commenced by 
the College of Medicine, applied to the Legislature for permission to raise 
money for that purpose by means of lotteries, which was accordingly 
granted to them ; but these lotteries, from the intervention of the late war 
and other causes, not proving so productive as was anticipated, the Re- 
gents were compelled to have recourse to other means to raise the requi- 
site funds. Several members of the faculty of Medicine, procured the 
loan of a considerable sum of money from one of the banks of Baltimore, 
on their individual credit, and became liable to mechanics and others to a 
large amount for work and materials furnished in completing the build- 
ings and improvements. Notwithstanding this partial relief, the debts of 
the corporation were found to be still large, and increasing, and it became 
necessary to seek some more effectual aid in liquidating them. This 
was generously afforded by the Legislature, at December session, 1821, 



in consequence of an application to them on behalf of the University. 
They enacted a law, authorizing a stock to be constituted to the amount 
of thirty thousand dollars, bearing an interest of five per cent, redeemable 
at the expiration of thirty years, the State guaranteeing the re-payment of 
the principal, and the punctual discharge of the interest in the meantime. 
The State, however, required that the interest on the loan should be paid 
by the Medical professors of the University, and that the treasurer of the 
State should take a bond to be annually given by the said professors, con- 
ditioned for the payment of the yearly interest. And one of which bonds 
is now held by the treasurer for the payment of the interest accruing the 
present year. 

By an act passed at the last session of the Legislature of Maryland, 
entitled, "An Act, supplementary to an act for founding an University," 
&c. several important and fundamental alterations have been made in the 
original act, which change the entire government and discipline of the 
University, and that too, without the approbation or assent of the Univer- 
sity itself. By one of its provisions, the Board of Regents, and the mem- 
of its several faculties, are discontinued and abolished. By another pro- 
vision of the same act, certain gentlemen therein named, are appointed 
trustees, and are vested with all the powers and privileges, and subject to 
the duties (not abolished by the said act,) which are imposed upon the 
Regents of the University. The said Trustees are further authorized to 
appoint and dismiss the Provost, Professors, and Lecturers at pleasure ; 
and in case of a vacancy in any one of the Professorships of either of the 
branches, the remaining Professors of that faculty have the privilege of 
nominating two persons to fill such vacancy, but the Trustees are not 
bound to accept either of the persons so nominated. 

All the rights of property now possessed by the Regents, are declared 
to be vested in, and belong to, the said Trustees ; but the Medical profes- 
sors are to remain answerable for the payment of the interest on the loan 
of $30,000, as required by the above mentioned act of 1821. 

After a careful and deliberate consideration of the preceding statement, 
we have no hesitation in giving it as our decided opinion, that the late act 
of Assembly, transferring the whole power and authority granted by the 
original acts of incorporation to the Regents of the University, and the 
property which has since been acquired by them, to the Trustees named 
in the late act, is a manifest violation of the rights created by the said ori- 
ginal acts, and a direct infringement of that article of the constitution of 
the United States, which forbids any State from passing a law, impairing 
the obligation of contracts. 

William Wirt, 
John Purviance. 

I concur, entirely, in opinion with the Attorney- General and Mr. Pur- 
viance. The Regents of the University were authorized, by the grant of 
the Legislature, to exercise certain privileges, and to acquire and hold pro- 
perty. An act, intended to abolish those privileges, without forfeiture, 
and to transfer that property to others, strikes me as being plainly repug- 
nant to the grant itself, and, therefore, void, by the Constitution of the 
United States. Daniel Webster. 



8 

Such being the decided opinion of counsel upon the legislative act 
referred to, it becomes our duty in pursuance of the resolutions of the 
Regents of the University, to request a suspension on your part of such 
measures as might otherwise be taken to carry the said act into operation, 
until the next meeting of the Legislature, when an application will be 
made for its repeal. 

Should it be deemed inexpedient, however, to comply with this request, 
we are prepared, in behalf of the Regents, to enter into such arrange- 
ments with you as will produce the speediest judicial decision upon the 
constitutionality of the law, by the proper tribunal ; and for this purpose 
we beg leave to say, that any communication addressed to the Right 
Reverend Bishop Kemp, as Chairman of the Committee of Regents, will 
receive their immediate attention. 

We are, gentlemen, with great respect, your obedient servants, 

James Kemp, 
William E. Wyatt, 
J. Meredith, 
Edward Pinkney, 
Maxwell M'Dowell, 

Committee, 



REPORT. 



OF THE 



JOINT COMMITTEE 



ON THE 



MEMORIAL OF THE REGENTS 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



ANNAPOLIS: 

WILLIAM m'nEIR, PRINTER. 
1839 



REPORT 



The undersigned a majority of the joint committee of the Senate and 
House of Delegates, to whom was referred the memorial of the Re- 
gents of the University of Maryland, beg leave to report: 

The memorialists claim as lawful Governois of the University of Ma- 
ryland, the surrender to them by the State or her agents of the proper- 
ty of that institution. For the proof of this claim they refer to their 
charter by which the University was created (act of 1812 ch. 153) and 
to the recent decision of the Court of Appeals in the case of the me- 
morialists against Joseph B. Williams Treasurer of the 'Trustees of 
the Univerisity of Maryland:' relying on that decison as establishing 
that the act of 1825 ch. 190, wdiich dispossessed them, and substituted 
in the controul of the institution the 'Trustees' as a nullity. This act 
of 1825 proceeded on the idea that the University w^as a public institu- 
tion, subject to the discietional government of the State, and virtually the 
States own property as to franchise and estate. Hence the trustees 
constituted by that act, and now holdingunder that authoritythe proper- 
ty of the institution are treated by the memorialists as introduced into 
their controul as agents of the State, and the State is regarded conse- 
quently as now through these individuals the effective occupant of the 
property; and the action of the State therefore as the superior of these 
trustees is claimed, to authorise and direct them to deliver the property 
to the Regents. The States explicit abandonment of her pretensions 
is solicited by the memorialists, as the proper act of respectful conform- 
ity to the judicial decision, and as the necessary procedure to rectify the 
error which led the State to invade private rights, and a redress w^hich 
she ought promptly to render. In these views the undersigned earn 
estly concur. The State is the real litigant with the memorialists. She 
originally supplanted them in error,but her true limits of power being 
now defined and elucidated, she cannot continue her assumed autho- 
rity without wrong, nor mdeed with due regard to her moral dignity. 
In yielding as now^ requested, she is not asked to perfotm any judicial 
function nor to legislate for a special case. She is appealed to in her 
sovereign capacity to act upon her pretensions as any individual is, w^ho 
is called on to retract his errors, and seeing that he has possessed him- 



4 ; 1 

self of anothers property in error, to restore it to him from whom he 
iias thus taken it. The decision referred to unequivocally shews the 
invalidity of the States pretensions, the restoration therefore of the su- 
perseded authorities of the Institutton is the necessary consequence, 
and the clearest dictate of honor, which bears no parley nor compro- 
mise in the opinion of the undersigned. It becomes no sovereignty to 
linger in unlawful positions^ nor to harrass the citizens with dilatory 
.expedients and partial and reluctant redress, aggrieved by its erroneous 
assumptions. The course of duty being thus suggested to the State by 
the first and best maxiim of morals in the present issue with the Re- 
gents of the University of Maryland, we propose, with studied brevity, 
to make some explanations which may be demanded for the satisfac- 
tion of those who, altho' embarking in their considerations with pro- 
found respect for the law, and with the general principles as here de- 
clared, to govern them, many wish to have all details elucidated, and 
doubts and difficulties which may have been suggested by extraneous 
circumstances or highly colored representations removed. 

The act of 1807, ch. 53, established a College of Medicine, and 
placed it under government of the Faculty of Physic, the constituents 
of the College and of the Board of Examiners of the Jliedical and Chi- 
rurgical Faculty of Maryland. These Governors were created a body 
corporate by the name of 'The Regents of the College of JVfedicine of 
Maryland.' The College of medicine is contemplated by the act as a 
body distinctly to be recognised, ^nd as the substantial portion of the crea- 
tion under the act, although enjoying corporate immunities and conve- 
niences only in its combination with the Board of Examiners. This 
College of Medicine is by the decision of the Court of Appeals, set- 
tled to be the same with the Faculty of Physic; and the terms ^College' 
and 'Faculty, in the act of 1807 referred to, are adjudged to be conver- 
tible terms, (see decision page 13.) 

The 'College of Medicine' was by the act, creating the University 
(1812, ch. 159,) expanded into an University by being authorised to 
annex to itself the three Faculties of Divinity, Law, and Arts and 
Sciences. The members of the College of Medicine of the Faculty 
of Physic, together with the members of the other three Faculties, were 
by the act for the University constituted a corporation by the style of 
'The Regents of the University ot JVfaryland.' The corporation of the 
University was duly organised under this act, and was prosperously ad- 
ministered by its legal and chosen government, the Regents, until the 
year 1826. Then was passed the obnoxious and now as the under- 
signed believe repudiated and eutirely annulled act of 1825, ch. 190, 
by which a government as the substitute of the Regents was instituted, 
and in act directly from the State, and called 'Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of ./liaryland,' and for the pui'pose of more easy and effectual ac- 
tion and completely to fill the place of the surperseded Regents were 



nade a corporate body.' In other worJ,> the theory of the act of 1825 
-vas that the University was a public corporation, to be regulated, mould- 
d, or even extinguished at the pleasure of the State, and its property 
be controlled and applied as to the State might seem expedient. — 
This theory is upon several grounds established to be unsound by the 
iecision referred to, and the act is declared to be absolutely invalid, be- 
yond the reach of remedy, even from the sanction of the opinions, or 
from any long aad marked acquiescence, if such ever existed, of the 
individual members of the Faculty of Physic, or of every other Faculty 
in the University. Every possible circumstance of such suppletory 
character in aid of the act, would seem to have been brought to bear in 
the testimony in the cause and deliberately w'eighed by the court, and 
rejected as unavailing, to implicate fatally the Regent corporation, and 
on its extinction to raise up the Trustees corporation. 

The scientific and faithful conduct of the University, may much re- 
dound to the public good; and imperfect instruction and careless disci- 
pline may bring unworthy members into 'the medical ranks. But eveti 
if experience had demonstrated that the most harmonious administra- 
tion, and the most exact erudition and luminous intelligence, are with 
peculiar success to be ensured through the State's control, it w^ould not 
follow that this Institution, and if this, every other medical or scientific 
Institution, must be absorbed into the State prerogative. The adjudi- 
cation, w^hich is here the ride of our judgment^ gives us other, and we 
must say safer precepts, and less hazardous tests of State supremacy in 
this department. The proper remedy for the State in any disappoint- 
ment of her pretentions under these doctrines, is, that she herself cieate 
a University, and build it up from her own immediate treasure, and rely 
in no measure upon individual sacrifice, and in no degree avail herself 
of individual resources and anxieties. But the public concern is, in all 
such Institutions as the University of Maryland, well guarded, for its 
permanent devotion to science, and the culture of all its exalted sub- 
jects are enhanced upon the very best impulses — the purely intellectual 
ambition, which is the basis of every such Institution, when the fruit of 
private effort; and although this Institution be a private corporation, and 
as regards the State^ may indifferently to her, have all the incidents of 
independent proprietary control of any other private corporation; yet 
here again the cause of science and the public benefit — as contradistin- 
guished from the State prerogative — is protected by the necessary, or- 
ganic condition of the corporate power, wdiich would not permit the 
property of the corporation to be diverted from its original purpose — 
the instruction for which the Institution was founded, and for which all 
its property has been acquired. But whatever restraints the chancery 
power might interpose to hold such an Institution to its original dedica- 
tion, still the fetatehasno inherent right «s State, io warrant its seizingall 
such publicly useful Institutions, as State property. Thus substantia- 
ted as inviolable private property, let us next enquire to what this corpo- 
ration, thus recalled to its ancient franchise, seeks to be restored. 



6 r ''""_ •• "- ^ 

This Institution bad its foundation laid in private enterprise. In 
1807, when the College of Medicine was established, a few zealous and 
scientific individuals conceived the plan of a school of medical instruc- 
tion. After maturing their views, and for some time, but with limited 
resources and appliances, although with ardent aim, practically carry- 
ing them out, they sought the consideration of the State; and obtained 
the act of incorporation of their College, and at the same session an 
act was passed giving to the College of Medicine, the privilege of 
drawing a Lottery, for raising forty thousand doHais. The medical 
professors composing this College of Medicine, did not, it appears, 
avail themselves of this lottery privilege, and nothing in fact was de- 
rived from it until after the College of xMedicine had passed into the 
enlarged body of the University of Maryland. It was not until the 
Professors of Medicine and the Professor of Law, had embarked their 
individual means and responsibility to purchase grounds, erect build- 
ings, procure the requisite apparatus, and in all respects to place the 
Institution upon the most ample and commodious plan of operatiouj 
that any resources were supplied from the lottery referred to. (See 
Report of committee of House of Delegates, session 1825, Journal 
page 309.) The several acts relating to the lottery privilege of 1807, 
are 1807, ch. Ill; 1808, ch. 96; 1811, ch. 132. After the Universi- 
ty was in operation, a further lottery privilege was granted, to raise 
$30,000, by act of 1813, ch. 125; and this sum was increased to 
$100,000, by act of 1816, ch, 78. In reference to this latter privilege 
several acts were passed, as the act of 1819, ch. 105, which in lieu of 
a tax of 5 per cent, requires the University to pay for each scheme 
drawn, $1800 to the State— the act of 1820, ch. 121, which modifies 
these dues to the State, and limits the drawings to ten schemes; which 
restriction, however, was repealed by the act of 1826, ch. 261. The 
lottery system organised as a revenue scheme by the State, being found 
to be somewhat interfered with by the exercise of the University lottery 
privileges, the legislature determined, without divesting the University 
of her right to the avails of the privilege, to put an end to her right to 
draw any more lottery schemes. Accordingly the act of 1827, ch. 198, 
recogni^^ing the unexhausted lottery rights of the University, provides 
th,at the balance of the privilege remaining to be realized, and then 
amounting to $40,946, should be paid to the University from the Trea- 
sury, by annual instalments of $5000, instead of being by successive 
drawings, raised by the lottery avails. This amount has accordingly 
been paid, as the equivalent of the University privileges; and the State 
has meanwhile been exempted from the competition of the University 
lotteries, and has enjoyed them herself. It will be perceived that all 
these lottery privileges date antecedently to the Trustee act of 1825, ch. 
190; and the act of 1827, ch. 198, is but an arrangement of commuta- 
tion of those lottery privileges. On all drawings the State was duly 
paid a tax, and so far she profited by them, But the 4pcision referred 



Ojdoes in no sense regard these lottery grants as endowments from the 
State; they in fact costing the State nothing;, and being really only dis- 
pensations from penalties^, under the prohibitory lottery law. If even, 
lowever, they were endowments, the decision tells us, as reason would 
suggest, that they would not render this corporation a State property.* 
In 1822 (by act of 1821, chap. 88,) the State was induced to lend 
he University $30,000, in stocks created for the purpose; the premium 
)f which, it was provided, should be received by the State instead of 
)y the University, and be set apart for a sinking fund ultimately to pay 
he principal of the loan; the Professors of the Faculty of Physic be- 
ng, however, required to enter into bond for the yearly payment of 5 
Der cent interest of the $30,000. This interest until a year before the 
recent rupture in the University, which led to the litigation adverted 
Lo, was duly paid, as we understand. In the year 1828, a legacy of 
|500, was bequeathed by Mr. George Gray to "the University of Ma- 
yland for the use of the Infirmary," and that sum was paid accordingly 
Dy Mr, Gray's Executors. Donations in books and specimens of va- 
'ious kinds, and articles to enrich the cabinets of the University, it is 
anderstood, were likewise made at different times to the University. 
The personal means and responsibility of the Professors of medicine 
ind of law, and these interests here detailed, have constituted the sources 
Df all the supplies for enabhng the University to furnish itself with its 
buildings, including, an Infirmary, and all appropriate apparatus.! In 
1826, its property then amassed was estimated at nearly $100,000. — 
Etmaybe mentioned that several of the acts specified by us, recognize 
the expenditures of the Professors; and we have therefore almost a Le- 
gislative history of their individual merits in founding and erecting this 
Institution, and a Legislative testimonial to the private character of the 
Institution, as illustrated by its origin, and the individual energies and 
hazards by which it was matured. The Report of the Committee, al- 
ready mentioned, at the session of 1825, recognizes these private ef- 
forts. The acts in connexion with this point are 1825, ch. 188 — 1827, 
ch. 198—1831, ch. 270. In 1831 the Legislature (by act of 1830, 
ch, 50,) authorised the property and government of "Baltimore Col- 
lege" to be passed to the University of Maryland, so as to enable this 
Institution to constitute an academical department under the auspices, 
and as part of the Faculty of the arts and sciences of the University of 
Maryland. The Baltimore College cession is declared by the act to be 
for the use of the Faculty of arts and sciences; and although as the ac- 
tual representatives, at the time, of the University, the Trustees are by 
the act made grantees in the deed of cession, yet the use and benefit 
of the cession is for the University; and the legitimate governors of it, 
as now declared, must of course succeed to the legal title. As, how- 
ever, this property has accrued since the date of the Trustee act, the 

•See Decision, page 17. 

t See Report of Committee, 1625. 



8 

Regents are content to have it excepted from any immediate surrende 
now asked for, and by a speedy chancery process to be provided, to be 
allowed to have all question as to this appendage of the University, ad-1 
judged between them and the State, or the Trustees, if they as an an 
auUed body, can be esteemed the appropriate litigants of any such is 
sue. The Legislature, for this inquiry, may allow them as individual 
to be made defendants to the judicial investigation. 

It is manifest that all the possessions of the University, derived fro 
these as the only sources which have been pomted out by either th 
Regents, or the representatives of the Trustees before the Committee 
are the fruits of rights in the Regents antecedently to the act of 1825 
ch. 190, excepting only Baltimore College, which is the property o: 
the University, by the terms of the grant, and is, we may add, the mor 
conclusively to be so regarded, because the debts of the Baltimore Col 
lege, we understand, were, after the cession paid, to an amount of mori 
than $7,000, om\ oi iYie funds of the University, The State is not, foi 
the purposes of this appeal to her justice, concerned to inquire whethei 
the avails of the Medical College Lottery of 1807, should have been 
enjoyed by the University, although granted for the benefit of that Col- 
lege, which was the central member of the University, and although the 
Lottery was drawn after the University act, and under sanction of th< 
State, and when the old corporation of the "Regents of the College 
Medicine,'' losing iis practical and substantial part ^ ceased to have, 
t never sirce has had,moie than an ideal existence. At the utmost^ ii 
that lapsed corporation, as it must be regarded, should be ever embo4 
died, the avails of the Lottery alluded to, could only be an item o/'mer^ 
deht as between the University and the primitive corporation. 

We have thus endeavored to show that the State has, since the yeal 
1826 been, (however innocent the motive originally,) an intruder oi 
the domain of these memorialists — on their franchise and estate no 
judicially shielded, and entrenched in the highest constitutional sane 
. tions. And we have shown that no comprehensive terms of surrende 
addressed to the Trustees as the agents of the State, will carry to th 
possession of the Regents any property beyond their demonstraWi 
right. 

A claim is made for restitution to a violated possession; and it is i 
j^erative. It is not a matter of grace — not a point of expediency — nol 
a question whether the State may be passive. It is a claim on h 
justice, to which she cannot honorably render a deferred, nor a temp 
rizing response — and upon which, true to her dignity, she must ' 
prompt and active in her reparation. 

To accomplish these just ends, the undersigned recommend the p 
sage of the accompanying bill. 

JAMES L. RIDGELY, 
TEAGLE TOWNSEND, 
W. WILLIAMS, 
W. W. WATKINS. - 



h< 



/u 



ryf^ 



PROSPECTUS 



OF THE 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 



FOR THE SESSION 18 3 94 



B A L T I fll R E : 
PRINTED BY JOHN MURPHY 

IK) MARKET STREET 



1839. 



FACULTY OF PPIYSIC 



Theory and Practice of Medicine^ 
NATHANIEL POTTER, M. D. 

Obstetrics^ Hygiene, and Medical Jurisprudence, 
RICHARD WILMOT HALL, iM. D. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 
SAMUEL GEORGE BAKER, M. D. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy, 
WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

Anatomy and Physiology, 
WILLIAM N. BAKER, M. D. 



Surgery — (For the present session.) 

Theoretical, 
RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D. 

Operative, 
WILLIAM N. BAKER, M. D. 



PROSPECTUS 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The Faculty of Physic of the University of Maryland, 
beg leave to announce to their friends and the public, that 
they have been restored to their ancient rights and franchises, 
by the highest courts of the state and by its Legislature; and 
that they are now in the full and undisputed possession of 
all the buildings and property which they formerly occupied. 

The Professors of Practice of Medicine and Surgery 
enjoy ample means of practical illustration of their rcspec- 



five courses in the Baltimore Infirmary, a commodious 
Institution, where every variety of disease in both depart- 
ments may be studied at the bedside. 

The Chemical apparatus is the most extensive and splendid 
in the Union. Additions have recently been made to it, and 
important alterations effected, for the purpose of giving to 
the class the most striking and brilliant illustrations of this 
branch of the science. 

The Professor of Anatomy will embrace in his course 
General and Special Anatomy, Pathology and Physiology. 
The Anatomical Department is provided with spacious rooms 
for dissection. The supply of materiels for anatomical pur- 
poses, is perhaps greater in Baltimore, than in any other 
city. An able and efficient Demonstrator will be in constant 
attendance. This Department, also offers to the student of 
Pathological Anatomy, a large and valuable museum, found- 
ed upon the cabinet of the late Allen Burns, which was pur- 
chased at the cost of ^8000, to which numerous additions 
liave been made, especially, beautiful preparations of the 
Lymphatic system, superficial and profound, procured from 



Italy. The museum contains magnified displays of the 
eye and ear, in wax, which will greatly facilitate the study 
of the minuter parts of those delicate organs. 

The Professors of Obstetrics and Materia Medica, are 
fully provided with all the best means of illustrating their 
respective branches. 

In conclusion, the Medical Faculty beg leave to assure 
the public that every eifort on their part will be made 
to restore the University of Maryland to its former use- 
fulness and fame. They only desire to sustain a fair 
and honorable competition with other schools. 

The course of Instruction will commence on the last 
Monday in October, and terminate on the first day of 
March. 

SAMUEL GEORGE BAKER, Dean. 



PROSPECTUS 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



ISnitJersitu of itlarulanJr, 



FOR THE SESSION 1840-41. 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY JOHN MURPHY, 

H6 MARKET STREET. 

1840. 



I 



I 



1 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 



NATHANIEL POTTER, M.D. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 

RICHARD WILiMOT HALL, M.D. 

Obstetrics, Hygiene, and Medical Jurisprudence. 



SAMUEL GEORGE BAKER, M.D. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 



WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M.D. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

WILLIAM N. BAKER, M.D. 
*Bnatomy and Physiology. 

NATHAN R. SxMITH, M.D. 

Lecturer on Surgery, 



. i 



PROSPECTUS 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



llnitJcrsitn of ittarylanb. 



The Faculty of Physic of the University of Maryland, 
grateful for the deep and wide spread interest manifested 
by the public towards their Institution, be^ leave to assure 
their friends that they are prepared to commence the ensu- 
ing Session of the Medical School with still increased 
means of usefulness. The vacancy in the Department of 
Surgery has been lately filled by the appointment of Prof. 
N. R. Smith as Lecturer, who will give a full and com- 
plete course on Surgery previous to his departure for 



Lexington, In extending their term of Lectures to six 
monthsj the Faculty have been governed by a desire to 
increase the opportunities of their Students in acquiring a 
knowledge of their Profession — while for the few who 
cannot conveniently spend six months in the city, they will 
consider an attendance during the last four months as 
equivalent to a full course. The Departments of Materia 
Medica and Obstetrics are abundantly provided with every 
convenience for illustrating those subjects. The Professor 
of Anatomy will include in his duties general and special 
Anatomy, Pathology and Physiology, and after the de- 
parture of Dr. Smith, will give an additional course of 
Lectures on Surgery. The Professors of the Theory and 
Practice of Medicine and of Surgery, will give daily Clinical 
instruction in the Baltimore Infirmary, where every variety 
of disease may be found in turn, and where the Students 
by the bed-side may watch the daily progress of every 
interesting case. The extensive and costly Anatomical 



Museum of the University, founded by the late Allen 
Burns, has been, during the last season, greatly enlarged 
by the addition of numerous valuable morbid preparations; 
and it will be rendered still more efficient by the arrival of 
a complete set of the celebrated Pathological Models by 
Thibert, ordered from Paris by Dr. Smith. They will 
be the only set in the country on this side of the mountains 
and will represent every form of diseased structure much 
more accurately than can be done by any mode of prepara- 
tion, and are intended to render the Lectures on Surgery 
vastly more instructive than they could be made otherwise. 
The Dissecting rooms in the main College building are 
spacious and well ventilated, the supply of subjects abund- 
ant, and the advantages offered for the study of Anatomy 
unequalled. The Chemical Apparatus, unsurpassed in 
splendor and extent by any in the country, has been mate- 
rially increased and improved by various additions, to 
render the experimental illustrations of the Science more 



brilliant and more striking. A very extensive set of* Che- 
mical symbols have lately been obtained, which simplify 
the important but difficult subject of definite proportions; 
and a select and valuable Mineralogical Cabinet has also 
been added, to exhibit, whenever possible, the native as 
well as the artificial forms and sources of the important 
articles of the Pharmacopeia. 

Such are the advantages which the Faculty offer to 
Medical Students, and which, without intending any invi- 
dious comparisons, they consider as peculiar to their Insti- 
tution. With other schools they are ready to sustain an 
honorable competition, and are perfectly willing to leave 
the question of success to be determined by their efforts to 
deserve success. 

The Lectures will commence on the first day of September 
next^ and will continue until the first day ofMa/rch following. 
WILLIAM E. A. AlKIN, Dean. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 



FOR THE 



SESSION 1841.'42, 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY JOHN MURPHY, 

146 MARKET STREET. 



I 

I 



ANNUAL CIRCULAH 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

The arrangements for the next Course of Lectures 
in this Institution being now complete, the annual 
term will commence on the first Monday of Sep- 
tember and be continued to the first of March. 

NATHANIEL POTTER, M.D. 

Professoi' of Theory and Practice. 

RICHARD W. HALL, M.D. 

Professor of Obstetrics. 

SAMUEL G. BAKER, M.D. 

Professor of Materia Medica. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M.D 

Professor of Chemistry. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M.D. 

Professor of Surgei^y and Lecturer on Anatomy. 

ALEXANDER C. ROBINSON, M D. 

Assistant Lecturer on Anatomy. 

GEO W. MILTENBERGER. M.D 

Dnnnnstrator. 



It will be seen that the. Chair of Surgery is 
now permanently filled, and that ample provision 
has been made for the Department of Anatomy. 
The extension of the Course, in one instance, to 
the period of six months, having met with univer- 
sal approbation, and being indeed demanded by 
the present state of Medicine, the Faculty have 
resolved to make that arrangement permanent. 
It is obvious that, in this respect, the University of 
Maryland furnishes advantages superior to those 
of any other School of Medicine in America. It 
is confidently hoped that the Profession will sus- 
tain this Institution in an innovation which cannot 
fail to be eminently conducive to the interests of 
Medical Science. 

The period has arrived when a diploma is no 
longer to be regarded as a guarantee of profes- 



sional success. The tests which reveal the amaimt 
of knowledge acquired by the pupil, are every day 
multiplying. Those only can hope for advance- 
ment, either in the medical staff of the public 
service, or in private practice, who make the best 
use of the best opportunities. 

The Marine Hospital having been restored to 
the Infirmary of the University, and that Institu- 
tion presenting also many interesting cases from 
among our citizens, the means of Clinical ilhis- 
tration will be ample. Important Surgical 
Operations are of frequent occurrence. 

It is well known that in the city of Baltimore 
the materials for the pursuit of Practical Anatomy 
are most ample, and easy of acquisition. In no 
city in America is public sentiment so indulgent 
in this respect. 



Early in the commencement of the Course 
numerous and very valuable additions to the 
Anatomical Cabinet, will be received from Paris. 

To THE Alumni of the University of Mary- 
land, AND the Friends of Southern Institutions, 
the Faculty make an earnest appeal in behalf of 
the Baltimore School of Medicine. They are 
reminded that recently this Institution has been 
rescued from difficulties, which for a time inter- 
rupted its career of usefulness. A decision of 
the highest Courts has given it a safe position, 
and rendered its government the most efficient. 
The State has generously released it from 
pecuniary responsibilities, and constituted it one 
of the best endowed schools in America, — its build- 
ing, apparatus, Museum and Infirmary, being un- 
surpassed. 



I 



The Faculty of Physic pledge themselves to 
the most indefatigable efforts to merit a widely 
extended patronage. 

As the extension of the Course to six months 
is a recent innovation, attendance during four 
months only, will, for the present, be required 
during each term. The Course will be rendered 
complete to those who enter from the 1st to the 
15th of November ; all are, however, advised to 
enter on the 1st of September. 

Candidates for Graduation are required to have 
attended two full courses, of four months, in this 
Institution ; or one in this, and one in some other 
accredited School of Medicine. 

The fee for the ticket of each Professor is $ 20, 
making $ 120 for the whole Course. 



8 

Practical Anatomy will be taught by the De- 
monstrator, the fee for whose course is $ 10 , — 
attendance optional with the pupil. The exten- 
sion of the term to six months will furnish the 
pupil with ample leisure for the prosecution 
of this highly important branch. Infirmary 

ticket, $ 5. 

N. R. SMITH, Dean. 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



STUDENTS 



ATTENDING LECTUllES 



IN THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



Wiviii^tVf^ltn of JUataUntr* 



Session of 1842-43. 



A L T I iM O R E : 



PRINTED BY ROBERT NEILSON, 

NO. 6j SOLTH CHARLES STREET, 

NOVEMBER, 1 S 12. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



NATHANIEL POTTER, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF THE THEORY A^D PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. 

RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF MIDWIFERY AND MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND HYGIENE, 

JOSEPH ROBY, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF SPECIAL AND GENERAL ANATOMY. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M.D., 

DEMONSTRATOR. 



CATALOGUE. 



JSCames. 
Atkinson, Thos. Gov. 
Austen, P. H. 
Bacon, Jas. E. 
Baer, Chas. Jacob 
Baker, Alfred 
Baltzell, Wm. H. 
Barry, Wm. J. 
Belt, S. J. M. 
Berryman, Upton H. 
Bodder, Horatio T. 
Bohrer, Benj. F., 
Bowie, Augustus J. 
Buckner, Chas. Smith 
Burch, Wm. 
Carroll, Thos. King, Jr. 
Caufman, Henry W. 
Clarke^ Sydenham R. 
Coale, Skipwilh H. 
Cobb, Wm, Almy 
Cochrane, Robt. M. 
Councilman, Jno. T. 
Crawford, A. W. 
Crawford, Jas. V. 



Preceptors, 
Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Chaisty, 
Dr. Jacob Baer, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. Chas. Duvall, 
Dr. Buckler, 
Dr. Bodder, 
Dr. Bohrer, 
U. S. Navy, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. R. C. Cuming, 
Dr. S. K. Handy, 
Dr. P. Fahnestock, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Buckler, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Baxter, 
Dr. Robinson, 
Dr. J. Donell, 
Dr. Baer, 



Residence, 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 

Middletown,Fred.co Md, 
Baltimore. 
Tennessee. 
Baltimore. 
P. George's co, Md, 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Georgetown, D. C. 
A. Arundel co, Md. 
Missouri. 
Frederick co. Md. 
Dorchester co, Md. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore, 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore co. Md. 
Butler CO. Pa. 
Baltimore. 



JVames. 

Cronise, J. Stoll 

Dallam, Wm. H. 

Dalrymple, Wra. D. 
^Dashiell, J. W. 
^ Deaver, Joshua M. 
"^ DifFenderfFer, Wm. II. 

Donaldson, Francis 

Dorsey, Joshua H. 

Duvall, Saml. A. 
^ Duvall, Wm. W. 

Ellery, Wm. E. 

Ford, Henry A. 

Frick, Jno. Chas. 
^ Frost, Henry 

Gamble, Jno. G. 

Giger, Frederick S. 

Golder, George 

Gough, Dixon 

Green way, E. M. Jr. 

Hagerty, Edward 

Hall, Caleb T. 

Hall, Jeremiah 

Hall, R. C. 

Harrison, Saml. A. 

Harwood, Benjamin 

Heard, Edward J. 

Heerman, Adolphus L. 
^ Hilliard, Robt. C. 

Horwitz, T. Byron 

Howard, John E. 

Hurtt, Thos. D. 



Preceptors, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. Alexander, 
Dr. Jas. Mclntire, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Hall, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew. 
Dr. J. W. Dorsey, 
Dr. Duvall, 
Dr. Chas. Duvall, 
Dr. Chaisty, 
Prof. Potter, 
Dr. Buckler, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Alms House, 
Dr. Robinson, 
Prof. Potter, 
Prof. Smith, 



Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Baxter, 
Prof. Hall, 
Dr. Dulin, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. J. Mudd, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. E. P. Scott, 
Dr. Horwitz, 

Dr. Tayraan, 



Residence, 
Frederick co. Md. 
Harford co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
Somerset co. Md. 
Harford co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 

Liberty, Fred. co. Md. 
Frederick co. Md. 
P. George's co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
St. Mary's co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Florida. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
St. Mary's co. Md. 
Baliimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Talbot CO. Md. 
A. Arundel co. Md. 
St. Martinsville, La. 
New Orleans. 
Hicksford, Va. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Kent CO. Md. 



JVames. 

Hutchinson, Robt. 
"^ Janney, Nathan H. 
V Johnston, Christopher 
' Kellogg, A. Otis 

Kirby, John W. 

Laroque, Alfred 

Lawrison, Dr. S. C. 
^ Lawrence, Richard 

Lewis, Willis W. 

McDowell, Jas. 
^ Maddox, Chas. J. 

Mapp, Saml. W. 

N Markham, Jas. B.] 

^ Mathias, Wm. A. 

Morris, John B. 

Morse, Jno. Fredk. 

O'Neal, J. W.Crapster 

Owen, Chas. W. 

Owens, Thomas F. 

Palmer, Benj. R. 

Palmer, Dr. James C. 

Palmer, John W. 

Pottenger, John H. 

Ragan, Wm. 

Riddell, Alexander 

Ridout, Saml. 

Robinson, Alexander 

Rogers, Saml. 0. 

Rudenstein, 
^^ Sappington, G. R. 
^ Seilcr, Jeremiah 



Preceptors. 
Dr. Thomson, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. Buckler, 
Dr. Whitridgc, 
Dr. Thomson, 
Dr. Chaisty, 



Residence. 

Baltimore co. Md. 

Loudon CO. Va. 

Baltimore. 

Cazenovia, N. York. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

U. S. Navy. 
Dr. D. Lawrence, Baltimore. 
Dr. Lewis, N. Carolina. 

Prof. Smith, Lexington, Va. 

Dr. A.H.Robertson St. Mary's co. Md. 
Prof. Hall, Accomack co. Va. 

Greensboro', Ala. 
Dr. Jos. A. Shorb, Carroll co. Md. 
Prof. Smith, Baltimore. 

Dr. Fahnestock, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Dr. Jno. Swope, Taneytown, Md. 
Prof. Potter, Norfolk, Va. 

Dr. Thos. Owens, A. Arundel co. Md. 
Dr. Fahnestock, Pittsburg, Pa. 

U.S. Navy. 
Dr. Dunbar, Baltimore. 

Prof. Chew, Baltimore. 

Dr. Chas. Macgill, Hagerstown, Md. 

Baltimore. 
Dr. Ridout, Annapolis, Md. 

Dr. Robinson, Virginia. 

Dr. Ridout, A. Arundel co. Md. 

Dr. John, Baltimore. 

Dr. T. Sappington, Liberty, Fred. co. Md. 
Dr. A. H. Van HofT, Cumberland co. Pa. 



J^ames, 

Shipley, Jos. P. H. 

Smith, Isaac 

Spence, Roht. T. 

Steele, T. Buchanan 
V Stone, Jas. M. 

Stewart, David 

Tilghman, S. R. 

Verback, Lewis F. 

White, Elias A. 
^ Willard, James 

Wirt, Wm. C. 

Wood, Dr. Wm. M. 

Wood, John 

Woodville, R. Caton 
^ Worthington, Rezin H 

Yeates, Henry P. P. 



Preceptors, 
Prof. Potter, 
Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. A. H. Bayly, 
Dr. Stone, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Thomas, 
Prof. Chew, 
Alms House, 
U. S. Navy, 
Dr. Wood, 
Prof. Smith, 
. Alms House, 
Dr. Yeates. 



Residence. 
Baltimore. 

Northampton co. Va. 
Baltimore. 

Cambridge, Dor. co. Md. 
Somerset co. Md. 
Baltimore. 

Queen Ann's co. Md. 
Franklin, Bait. co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Florida. 
Baltimore. 
Indiana. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore co. Md. 
Baltimore. 



I 






/ *• 



P 



The Medical Faculty respectfully inform the public, that their 
next Annual Course of Lectures will commence on the last Monday 
of October, 1843, and be continued tillthe^rs^ day of March follow- 
ing. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two cours- 
es of Lectures in this institution ; or one course in this after one in 
some other espectable school of medicine. 

The fee for the ticket of each professor is twenty dollars, making 
one hundred and twenty dollars for the whole course. 

For clinical instruction in the Lifirmary the fee is five dollars. 

Practical Anatomy is taught by the Demonstrator, the fee for whose 

course is ten dollars, 

SAMUEL CHEW, Dean, 



CATALOGUE 



O F 



STUDENTS 



TTENDING LECTURES 



N THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



m%xii}tvmtyt of M^^v^lunXi. 



Session of 1843-44. 



B A I, T I M o R t: : 
PRINTED BY ROBERT NEILSON, 



NO. 6 , SOUTH CHARLES S T R E K X , 

F E B R U A Tx Y , 18 4 1. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF MIDWIFERY AND MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND HYGIENE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF SPECIAL AND GENERAL ANATOMY, AND LECTURER ON 
THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. 

WILLIAM H. STOKES, M.D., 

LECTURER ON MIDWIFERY AND MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M.D., 

DEMONSTRATOR. 



I 



I 



CATALOGUE. 



J\*ames. 
Aiken, Robt. E. 
Anderson, Wash'ton F. 
Atkinson, Thos. C. 
Austen, Philip A. 
Bacon, Jas. E. 
Baker, Alfred 
Baldwin, Edwin C. 
Barry, Wm. J. 
Battee, John S. 
Beckett, Truman D. 
Belt, Shadrach J. M. 
Berryman, Upton H. 
Bodder, Horatio T. 
Boone, Jerningham 
Brown, Allison 
Burch, William 

Carter, Edward L. 

Carter, Robt. C. 

Clark, Charles K. 

Clarke, Sydenham R. 

Clary, Jonathan 

Cobb, Wm. Almy 

Colburn, Edmond F. 

Councilman, Jno. T. 

Crane, Thos. H. 

Crawford, Jas. V. 

Cronise, J. Stoll 



Preceptors, 

Dr. G. B. Aiken, 

Dr. Anderson, 

Infirmary, 

Dr. Baxley, 

Dr. F. Coskery, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Kinnemon, 

Infirmary, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Hanson Penn, 

Infirmary, 

Dr. Jno. Buckler, 

Dr. Bodder, 

Dr. Wm. Waters, 

Dr. Power, 

Dr. R. C. Cuming, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Fonerden, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Robinson, 

Dr. Crane, 

Dr. Baer, 

Dr. Dunbar, 



Residence, 

Carrol County, Md. 

Alabama. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Prince George's co. Md. 

Prince George's co. Md. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Fredericktown, Md. 

Baltimore. 

Frederick co. Md. 

Elkton, Md. 

Elkton, Md. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore co. Md. 

Queen Anne's co. Md. 

Baltimore. 

Frederick co. Md. 



JYaynes. 
Dalrymple, Wm. D. 
Danforth, Nathaniel B. 
Donaldson, Francis 
Earle, Jol-in Chas. 
Ellery, Wm. E. 
French, R. Melville 
Frick, John Chas. 
Friedhofer, 
Garry, Michael M. 
Giger, Frederick S. 
Gilraan, Judson 
Golder, George 
Gough, Dixon 
Grieves, J. G., M.D. 
Grove, Augustus G. 
Hall, Estep 
Hall, Jeremiah 
Harwood, Benjamin 
Heard, Edward J. 
Heermann, Adolphus 
Heiner, John 
Hill, Chas. H. 
Hill, Joseph H. 
Hines, Wm. Marshall 
Hobbs, Warner 
Horwitz, Phineas J. 
Horwitz, T. Byron 
Hughes, J. C. 
Jamison, Wm. D. 
Johnston, Christopher 
Keener, Wm. H. 
Keen, Thos. W. 
Kent, Daniel 
McDowell, James 
McGugin, David L. 
McKee, Wm. J. 
Mapp, Saml. W. 



Preceptors. 
Dr. Mclntire, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. Jas. Bordley, 
Dr. Chaisty, 
Practitioner, 
Dr. Buckler, 

Dr. T. J. McGill, 
Dr. Robinson, 
Prof. Smith, 
Infirmary, 
Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Shipley, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Baxter, 
Infirmary, 
Dr. Mudd, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. G. P. Aiken, 
Dr. McLaughlin, 
Dr. Jno. Kirkwood 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Wm. Waters, 
Dr. Horwitz, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. J. F. Perkins, 
Prof. Smith, 
Alms House, 
Dr. Dulin, 
Dr. A. Wade, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Smith, 
Practitioner, 
Dr. Oellig, 
Prof. Hall, 



Residence, 
Baltimore. 
Massachusetts. 
Baltimore. 

Queen Anne's co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
Franklin co. Pa. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Frederick co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
New Hampshire. 
Baltimore. 
St. Mary's co. Md. 
Cumberland, Md. 
New Town, Wor. co. Md 
Anne Arundel co. Md. 
Baltimore. 

Anne Arundel co. Md. 
St. Martinsville, La. 
Baltimore. 
Carroll co. Md. 
Baltimore. 
, New Madrid co. Mo. 
Baltimore. 
Fredericktown, Md. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 

Washington, co. Pa. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Franklin co. Va. 
Anne Arundel co. Md 
Lexington, Va. 
Mount Vernon, Ohio. 
Franklin co. Pa. 
Accomack co. Va. 



JYames, 
Marsh, J. Eccleston 
Marshall, Ashton A. 
Miles, James H. 
Mills, Thos. Franklin 
Moran, John J. 
Nelson, Nathan 
O'Neal, J. W. C. 
Owen, Chas. W. 



Preceptors. 

Dr. P. Wroth, 
Dr. Alexander, 
Dr. Plowden, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. Sim, 
Dr. Jno. Swope, 
Infirmary, 
Dr. Thos. Owens, 
Dr. Owings, 
Dr. Fahnestock, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. Henry Wirt, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Prof. Chew, 



Owens, Thos. F. 

Owings, S. Kennedy 

Palmer, Benjamin R. 

Palmer, John W. 

Palmer, Thos. M. 

Piggot, Aaron S. 

Pottenger, John H. 

Reese, Charles 

Robinson, Alexander 

Rogers, Francis. 

Rudenstein, John, M.D 

Rutland, Wm. C. 

Sheets, Joseph 

Shipley, Jos. P. H. 

Smith, Charles H. 

Smith, Isaac 

Spence, Robt. T. 

Steele, Thos. B. 

Stewart, David 

Tilghman, S. R., M.D. 

Van Bibber, Wm. Chew Prof. Smith, 

Warfield, Evan W. Dr. G. Warfield, 

Wigman, Herman 

Wilson, Jas. H. 

Wingate, William L, 

Wood, John 

Woods, Edward D. 

Yeates, Henry P. P. 



Dr. Robinson, 
Dr. Jno. Ridout, 



Dr. Dunbar, 
Prof. Chew, 
Alms House, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. A. H. Bayly, 



Infirmary, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. T. H. Handy, 
Infirmary, 
Dr. McLaughlin, 
Dr. Yeates, 



Residence* 

Chestertown, Md. 

Virginia. 

St. Mary's co. Md. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Liberty, Fred. co. Md. 

Clay CO. Missouri. 

Baltimore. 

Anne Arundel co. Md. 

Baltimore. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Baltimore. 

Montecello, Florida. 

Maryland. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Virginia. 

Anne Arundel co. Md. 
Baltimore. 

Dover, Tennessee. 

Wheeling. 

Baltimore. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Northampton co. Va. 

Baltimore. 

Cambridge, Md. 

Baltimore. 

Queen Anne's co. Md. 

Carroll co. Md. 

Howard District, Md. 

Baltimore. 

Easton, Md. 

Cambridge, Md. 

Indiana. 

Louisiana. 

Baltimore. 



The Medical Faculty respectfully inform the public, that their 
next Annual Course of Lectures will commence on the last Monday 
of October, 1844, and be continued tillthe^rs^ day of March follow- 
ing. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two cours- 
es of Lectures in this institution ; or one course in this after one in 
some other respectable school of medicine. 

The fee for the ticket of each professor is twenty dollars, making 
one hundred and twenty dollars for the whole course. 

For clinical instruction in the Infirmary the fee is five dollars. 
Practical Anatomy is taught by the Demonstrator, the fee for whose 
course is ten dollars, 

SAMUEL CHEW, Dean. 



^\^)] 

V:/^ 



ONE SHEET, PERIODICAL. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



SM3)i^»siiE-^ &i M^'s^^^ffim^j 



^ 




^yj:-^ 



% 



B A L T I I\l O R E : 
PRINTED BY JOHN MURPHY, 

14 6 MARKET STREET. 
1844. 



^; 






RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D., 



WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D., 
NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 



<^{p?/r:<e?it. 




SAMUEL CHEW, M. D^ 



JOSEPH ROBY,tM. D., 

l^z^/ejjor- o/^]^€nato???y anc/ L^/iytic'c/o^ju. 

ELISHA BARTLETT, M. D., 

^':fzoJ^4aor^ o/Gjdeoiy anc/ ^^zactc'ce o^ QyKec/cccne. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, xM. D., 



PROSPECTUS 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The Faculty of Physic of the University of Maryland, have the pleasure 
to announce to the Profession, that the vacant Chair of Theory and Practice of 
Medicine having been permanently and most satisfactorily filled, by the 
appointment of a gentleman well and deservedly known as a most successful 
teacher,* and many additional means of instruction having been provided for 
the several departments, they are prepared to commence the ensuing session of 
the Medical School with widely extended means of usefulness. For the infor- 
mation of gentlemen at a distance, it may be proper to state, that the College 
Buildings were erected many years since, without restriction as to* cost, for the 
express purpose for which they have since been occupied, and in point of con- 
venience and comfort are unsurpassed by any in the country. The lecture 
rooms are spacious, comfortable, well warmed aod v?ntilated; the dissecting 
room airy and well lighted ; the Anatomical Museum, already abundant, annu- 
ally increasing, and the Laboratory and Chemical Apparatus peculiarly fitted 
for exhibiting all the brilliant demonstrations indispensable for a satisfactory 
Chemical Course. The Hospital department of the University, in the imme- 
diate vicinity, and nearly opposite the Medical College, from its proximity, 
offers advantages for Clinical studies not to be found elsewhere. Here the stu- 
dent can, day by day, watch the progress of disease and the operation of reme- 
dies, and become familiar with the aspect of both acute and chronic complaints — 
can not only witness surgical operations, but also what is equally important, 
the nature and result of after treatment — advantages not to be obtained, where 
the Hospital is at a distance and visited only at long intervals. For practical Ana- 
tomy the material has always been most abundant, the mere surplus supplying 
other schools. By an arrangement with the College of Pharmacy, the lectures 
upon Practical Pharmacy before that Institution, will be delivered in the Uni- 
versity buildings, and will thus be accessible to all who may desire to enjoy the 

* Ei-isHA Bartlett, M. D. late Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine in the 
Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky., (which place he resigned to connect himself with 
the Baltimore school) who has already distinguishej himself as one of the most popular 
teachers and eminenUy practical lecturers in our country. 



PROSPECTUS OF THE 

advantage. Attendance upon these lectures will be entirely optional with the 
student. The Faculty will provide free tickets of admission for all the members 
of the class who may be candidates for graduation ; for the admission of the 
other members of the class, a small fee will be charged. By an arrangement 
with H. CoLBURN, M. D. one of our most prominent booksellers, a medical 
reading room will be opened in the College buildings, where the student will 
find all the important American and English medical periodicals, and where, in 
the intervals of lectures, he can note the daily discoveries in his profession. 
The following sketch will give an idea of the character of the course of in- 
struction in this School : 



Obstetrics^ Diseases of Women and Children, and Hedical 
Jurisprudence. 

Prof. RICHARD WILMOT HALL. 

The first embraces a full description of the structure and relations of the 
pelvis — of its investments and contents, and their functions and diseases — at 
the period of puberty, during gestation — parturition and the puerperal state — of 
embryology — signs of pregnancy — increment and changes of the foetus. A 
printed synopsis of Parturition is presented to each member of the class, ex- 
hibiting at one view every variety of natural, preternatural, manual or instru- 
mental iabur, showing their causes and modes of management, as sanctioned by 
the best authorities, and confirmed by long experience. The phenomena of the 
puerperal state and of lactation are treated of and explained, as also the man- 
agement and diseases of children. 

The second Medical Jurisprudence treats of the rules of medical evidence in 
Court, of the laws relating to the legitimacy of marriages — of children, of infan- 
ticide, of abortion,-«i£ rape — of the causes of death by accident or intention, of 
homicide, suicide, of poisoning, hanging, drowning, suffocation ; of the lethality 
of blows, lesions, wounds — of insanity, alienation of mind, idiocy, monomania, 
mania — of the police of cities, as to quarantines, health laws, manufactories, 
cemeteries, sewers, &.c. A large collection of wet and dry preparations, plates, 
paintings, casts, instruments and machines, &.C., cu-e used to illustrate the 
obstetric course. 



Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

Prof. WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN. 

The course will commence with a preliminary explanation of the nature and 
properties of the imponderable agents and the laws of chemical attraction, as 
influencing chemical operations, after which all the various simple and com- 
pound substances known to possess the slightest interest to the medical student 
will be systematically and successively brought before the class, their properties 
exhibited, and demonstrated experimentally, and their relations to medicine 
pointed out. The time will be principally occupied in explaining and incul- 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. / 

eating those fundamental truths and principles of the science, (illustrating all 
experimentally,) which will enable the student to apply his knowledge to practi- 
cal purposes, and but little attention will be given to those rare and unimportant 
substances, so prominent in all chemical works, and so Ibrbiddingto the student, 
seen perchance but once in a lifetime, and wholly destitute ol practical value. 
All the chemical processes of the United States Pharmacopeia will be explained 
in full — the incorapatibles of all the important metlicinal substances noted and the 
cause of such incompatibility demonstrated.— The various reagents and the best 
processes for detecting all the mineral poisons will be exhibited — in short all the 
most important relations of Chemistry, to Physiology, Pathology, Therapeutics, 
and Toxicology will be pointed out. The apparatus in this department is be- 
lieved to be unequalled by that of any other Institution, and affords every pos- 
sible facility for teaching a science which can only be taught by experiment. 



Surgery. 

Prof. NATHAN R. SMITH. 

As it is highly important that Practical Surgery should be illustrated, as much 
as possible, by the department of Anatomy progressing collaterally with it, the 
arrangement of the course of Surgery will be mainly anatomical. 

Pathological Principles, of especial interest to the Surgeon, will be first con- 
sidered. Irritation, congestion, inflammation, will occupy the beginning of the 
course, and will be followed by general observations on those Injuries, the 
treatment of which is the province of the Surgeon. Next, as most intelligible 
at that period, will be taken up the subject of Injuries of the Skeleton — Frac- 
tures and Dislocations — illustrated^by numerous morbid preparations and casts, 
which the Professor has been for several years accumulating. The application 
of various forms of apparatus will be exhibited, and the requisite operations 
illustrated. Next will naturally follow Diseases of the Bones and Joints — In- 
tiammation. Caries, Necrosis, Exostosis, Osteosarcoma, Rachitis, Distortions, 
Arthrocacy, Wounds of Joints, he. he. Diseases and Injuries of the Muscular 
System will follow. Then will be introduced the important topic of Injuries 
and Diseasesofthe Arteries and Veins—Traumatic and Spontaneous Hemorrhage, 
Aneurism, Phlebitis, &c. Next will conveniently come injuries of the Cranium 
and its contents, and such diseases of the Head as pertain to Surgery, and with 
them. Injuries of the Nerves, Neurosis, Neuralgia, Tetanus, &,c. &.c. Then 
injuries and diseases of the Abdomen and its contents — Wounds of the Vis- 
cera, Hernia, kc. Injuries and Diseases of the Thorax and its contents, and 
with them, those of the Throat — Foreign Bodies in the Trachea and ffisophagus 
and the requisite operations. Particular attention will be given to the Injuries 
and Diseases of the Urinary and Genital organs — Syphilis, Gonorrhcra, Stric- 
ture, Lithiasis, Lithotomy. The modern operation of Lithotripsy, in the per- 
tbrmance of which the Professor has been many years engaged, will receive 
especial notice. Diseases and Injuries of the Eye and Ear will be next treated, 
and the subject of Tumors and Morbid Growths, will conclude the course. To 
illustrate all the above topics, the Professor will constantly avail himself of his 
own extensive collection, and also of the very valuable Museum of the late 



PP.OSPF.CTfS OF TIIF. 



Allan Burns, which for many years has boen the property of the University, 
The practical lessons received by the jnipils in the Hospital department, will 
constitute an exceedingly important part of the course. It is believed that no 
Hospital in America furnishes a greater number of important and interesting 
surgical operations. 



Therapeutics, Hateria BSedica and Hygiene. 

Prof. SAMUEL CHEW. 

In this department, the first subjects of discussion are the doctrines of 
General Therapeutics, and the nature and mode of action of Medicines. 
The various methods of classifying these agents are next considered, 
and an arrangement of them adopted in reference to the remedial influence 
which they exert upon the human economy. The character and therapeutic 
uses of the several classes are fully detailed. The individual agents of which 
they consist are examined in the order of their relative value and impor- 
tance. A brief account is given of the natural history of each one of 
them, and of its commercial history, and chemical composition. A more ex- 
tended view is presented of the effects which each is capable of producing on 
the healthy living system, and especial attention is bestowed to designate the 
precise nature of its action. The various diseases are noticed in which each 
has been employed. The nature of those diseases is investigated, and from that 
and from the general character of the agent, are deduced, as far as practicable, 
the philosophy of its application in each malady, and the explanation of its effects 
whether salutary or injurious. The discussion of Pathology, or the nature of 
diseases, and of the therapeutic employment of remedies, constitutes the most 
extensive, as it is the most important portion of the course. 

Care is used throughout to compare and harmonize the established facts of 
Clinical observation with the.conclusions legitimately derived from Physiology 
and Pathology; and the necessity Is inculcated of avoiding the opposite errors 
of dogmatic attachment to theoretic reasoning on the one hand, and blind sub- 
mission to imperfect and mistaken experience on the other. 

The lectures on Hygiene comprise a view of the manner in which physical 
agents act upon the human body, so as to promote the proper performance of 
its functions, and produce health ; the manner in which those agents act upon 
the body so as to disorder or interrupt its functions and produce disease ; and the 
manner in which the action of those agents may be so regulated as to secure 
their good effect, the maintenance of health, and prevent their ill effect, the 
production of disease. The causes of health and disease which influence man- 
kind in general having been considered, the nature and effects of those causes 
are pointed out which act upon the health of particular classes of men, in con- 
sequence of their pecuHar trades and vocations. The course concludes with an 
account of the effects of climate, and of the peculiarities with regard to health and 
disease which arise from difference of sex, and which occur at different periods 
of life. 

The lectures on Materia Medica will be amply illustrated by a cabinet of 
specimens of all the various substances described, and by an extensive collec- 
tion of accurate colored engravings of medical plants, both indigenous and 
exotic. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 



IJeneral and Descriptive Anatomy and Physiology. 

Pkof. JOSEPH ROBY. 

From the well known advantages presented by the University, from the abun- 
dance of the materiel for the prosecution of Anatomical studies, the Professor is 
enabled at all times, to give the fullest and most perfect demonstration of all 
parts of his subject 

At the same time, however, that the recent subject is thus presented to 
the Student, and every opportunity is afforded of viewing and studying the 
various portions of the frame, in their natural appearances, positions and 
relations, on all points of minute Anatomy, and in the demonstration of all 
regions, which are intricate and complicated in their structure, recourse is had 
to highly magnified drawings, in order to facilitate still farther his progress in 
this important branch of his studies. 

In connection with the course on Anatomy, is delivered a full course upon 
Physiology also. Desirous that the Student should regard this branch of the 
science, not as a mere tax upon his memory, or as a matter of mere dry detail, 
but as one upon which is to be founded, in great measure, his practical know- 
ledge, the Professor takes every opportunity to enforce upon his attention those 
precepts, which are deducible from the structure and arrangements of the organs, 
parts and regions described; referring particularly, in treating of the skeleton, 
its articulations, the ligaments and muscles, to their surgical diseases, and to the 
philosophy of dislocations and fractures ; alluding, while speaking of the vari- 
ous organs and viscera, as well to their pathological conditions, as to their physi- 
ological functions, and their position with regard to wounds, surgical operations, 
&c. (in which he is enabled to do full justice to his subject by the extensive 
museum connected with his department), and in every part of his course en- 
deavoring to bring particularly before the notice of his class, those points, which 
are to be of daily and hourly importance to them in their professional career. 



Theory and Practice, 

Prof. ELISHA BARTLETT. 

This course will be made up almost entirely of the natural history, the diag- 
nosis, and management of individual diseases. Hypothetical speculations, both 
ancient and modern, which, under the specious and captivating, but false, guises 
o{ Medical Doctrines <ind Medical Theories, hnve generally occupied, and still 
continue to occupy so large a space in this department of instruction — wasting 
the time and perverting the minds of the pupils — will be wholly discarded ; and 
the great object of the teacher will be to impart to the members of his classes 
such knowledge as will be available to them in the daily discharge of their pro- 
fessional duties. He will endeavor to teach them, not his own particular views, 
or speculations, or opinions, merely, nor those of a few other ingenious and 
ianciful men, but the science and art of special pathology and therapeutics, or 
of practical medicine, as it actually exists, — the aggregate result of the labors 



10 



PROSPECTUS OF THE 



and achievements of past ages and of the present time ; and throughout his 
whole course of practical instruction, he will constantly strive to irubue the 
minds of his pupils with the principles of a sound medical philosophy. 

In order to facilitate the acquisition of a practical knowledge of the physical 
signs of disease, — so essential to accurate and positive diagnosis, — he will meet 
the members of his class, in small clubs, near the commencement of the term ; 
and in this way endeavor to give to each of them, individually, such demon- 
strative instruction as may be necessary, in order to enable them subsequently 
to prepare themselves for the profitable use of auscultation and percussion. 
The facilities for Clinical instruction furnished by the Hospital department, 
will enable him very easily to accomplish this, and will permit him, he trusts, 
to exhibit to the class, during the course of the term, cases of all the important 
diseases of ordinary occurrence, and a great many of the more rare modifica- 
tions. The regular Clinical instruction there given by the bed-side will con- 
stitute a very important and interesting part of the course. 



Practical Anatomy. 

G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

The proverbial reputation of the University of Maryland, for the abundant 
supply of subjects, offered to her students., renders it unnecessary farther to 
dwell upon this point, than to assure those, who are desirous of pursuing Practi- 
cal Anatomy, that every facility will be afforded them, and that the arrange- 
ments, made in connection with this department, are such as constantly to give 
them an Ample supply for all purposes, such indeed as can be offered to them 
by lew if any schools in the country. In order to assist the class in every way, 
as far as possible, a large portion of the day is spent by the Demonstrator in 
his rooms, and it is his custom to demonstrate, from day to day, such portions 
of the bod3% as the different classes are studying, with their healthy and diseased 
structure, their surgical relations, and such operations as they are most usually 
called upon to perform. Besides which, a full and thorough series of lectures 
upon Surgical Anatomy is given, commenci^'jg the first of the session and con- 
tinuing through the course. 

That nothing may be wanting to insure to the Student every advantage which 
could possibly be desired, the Dissecting Rooms will be opened, the first of Oc- 
tober, a month previous to the commencement of the regular session, and during 
the month a course of lectures will be given by the Demonstrator on Splanch- 
nology ; the first lecture being delivered on the first Monday of October. 



FACULTY OF 



11 



HOSPITAL DEPARTBIEMT. 

This department, long known as the Baltimore Infirmary, placed in the 
immediate vicinity, and nearly opposite tlie Medical College, presents opportu- 
nities not lurnished elsewhere for the study of disease. During the session of 
Lectures the Surgical cases are attended by the Professor of Surgery, and the 
Medical cases by the Professor of Theory and Practice ; both of whom visit 
the house daily at hours convenient for the attendance of the class, thus 
enabling them to note the daily progress of every interesting case of acute 
disease, and the after-treatment in Surgical operations. In addition to this. 
Clinical lectures are given by each of the above Professors regularly twice 
every week, and oftener when cases of unusual interest occur, as frequently 
happens. Important Surgical operations are of frequent occurrence : the fol- 
lowing abstract from the books of the house, showing the operations performed 
during the last two sessions, will exhibit at a glance the opportunities in this 
respect. 

OPERATIONS. 



Amputation of thigh 3 

Do. leg 5 

Do. foot 1 

Do. arm 2 

Fracture of femur 10 

Do. leg 11 

Do. femur and fracture and 

dislocation of radius. . 1 

Do. humerus 2 

Do. and dislocation of hu- 
merus I 

Do. olecranon 2 

Do. forearm 2 

Do. clavicle 2 

Do. lower jaw 1 

Do. OS frontis 1 

Dislocation of shoulder 2 

Do. knee I 

Do. ancle 1 

Operation for necrosis S 

Do. artificial joint 5 

Do. cataract 20 

Staphyloma 3 

Strabismus 3 



Pterygium 1 

Ectropion 1 

Artificial pupil 1 

Lithotomy 1 

Stricture of urethra. 3 

Recto- vesical fistula. 1 

Calculus in urethra 4 

Fistula in scroto 1 

Do. ano 19 

Do. perineo 3 

Extirpation of schirrous testicle. . . 1 
Do. do. tumor of 

perineum 1 

Do, do. eye 3 

Do. do. breast.... 10 

Do. polypus of nasal fossa I 

Do. fungus hematodes of 

eye-lid 1 

Do. carcinoma 2 

Do. sarcoma of lower jaw 1 

Hydrocele 10 

Polypus of uterus 2 

Clubfoot 1 

Tracheotomy 1 

Operation for tumor of median nerve 1 



12 



PROSPECTUS OF THF. 



PRACTICAL PHARMACY. 

DAVID STEWART, M.D. 

PROFESSOR or THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PHARMACY, 

III the Maryland College of Pharmacy. 

The lectures in Theoretical and Practical Pharmacy will embrace an exhibi- 
tion of the apparatus, which is usually employed in Pharmaceutical operations, 
with the principles upon which it is constructed, and suggestions with regard to 
the substitutes that may be employed ; a review of that part of the United 
States Dispensatory which treats of preparations, and the most approved mode 
of preparing and compounding those medicines most frequently used, and par- 
ticularly those, which it is necessary should be formed extemporaneously. 
Specimens of imperfect and adulterated medicines will be compared with those 
carefully selected and prepared, and the mode of detecting adulterations ex- 
plained and exhibited, particularly with reference to those constantly in use. 
It will be left entirely optional with the class to attend these lectures or not, as 
they may prefer. The Faculty will provide tickets for all members of the class 
who may be candidates for graduation ; for all others the fee for Professor Stew- 
art's ticket will be five dollars. 



^^(hmt ®(!rt^tn0 



To contribute as much as possible to the comfort and convenience, as well as 
the instruction of the class, the Faculty have made an arrangement with Dr. 
CoLBURN, to open a Medical Reading Room, in the College building, for the 
use of Medical Students, where gentlemen will have an opportunity of examin- 
ing all the prominent medical periodicals and other works of interest, and at the 
same time may conveniently procure the various text books used in the College, 
and other medical works. The want of a pleasant room of this kind, during 
the hours not occupied by 'lectures, has long been felt, and its advantage will 
undoubtedly be fully appreciated. (See advertisement on cover.) 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 13 



Fees, Regulations, &c. 

The next annual Course of Lectures will commence on the last Monday of 
October, 1844, and be continued until the first day of March following. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two courses of Lec- 
tures in this institution ; or one course in this after one in some other respecta- 
ble school of medicine. 

The fee for the ticket of each professor is ticentij dollars, making one hundred 
and twenty dollars for the whole course. 

For clinical instruction in the Infirmary the fee is five dollars. Practical 
Anatomy is taught by the Demonstrator, the fee for whose course is ten dollars. 
Attendance, although not obligator}', is strongly recommended as highly desira- 
ble by the Faculty. 

Payment for tickets will be received in the current notes of the solvent banks 
of the States where Students respectively reside. The price of board and all 
other incidental expenses^ are as low in Baltimore as in any other city in the 
country, and probably lower than in any more southern city. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, Dmn. 



jd\ 



14 TROSPECTUS OF THE FACLLTY OF PHYSIC. 

FOR THE SESSION OF 1843-44, 
IFho received their Degrees at the commencement March, 1844. 

NAMES. RESIDENCES. SUBJECT OF THESIS. 

Thos. F. Owings A. Arundel Co. Md.. .Phihuis. 

J no. H. Pottinger Baltimore, Md Gastritis. 

Dixon Gough St. Mary's Co. Md Apoplexij. 

Jos. P. S. Shipley Baltimore, Md Dysentery. 

Horatio D. Bodder. ... " " Pneumonia. 

Wm. D. Dalrymple. . . " " Lithiasis. ^ 

Wm. Burch Frederick Co. Md Phthisis Puhnonalis. 

David Stewart Baltimore, Md Chronic Pneumonia. 

Benjamin R. Palmer. .Pittsburgh, Pa Dysentery. 

Wm. E. Ellery Baltimore, Md Intermittent Fever. 

Benjamin Harvvood. . .A. Arundel Co. Md.. .Detirium Tremens. 

Isaac Smith Northampton Co. Ya...Bronchocde. 

J. W. C. O'Neal Carroll Co. Md Arnica Montana. 

Robert E. Aikin '•' " " Apopleocy. 

John Wood Indiana Pneumonia. 

Wash'n F. Anderson.. Alabama .Menstruation. 

Edward J. Heard St. Martinsville, La.. . Scrofuta. 

Estep Hall A. Arundel Co; Md.. .Hydrocele. 

Charles H. Smith Norfolk, Va Endocarditis. 

Jonathan Clarv Baltimore, Md \ P''''^'^' Functions of the Brain 

i and Nervou.% System. 

Thomas M. Palmer. . .Florida Intermittent Fever. 

Jerningham Boone. . .Fredericktown, Md.. . Osteogeny. 
Shadrach J. M. Belt. .Pr. George's Co.'Md. .Rubeola. 

John S. Councilman. .Baltimore County. Studies of a Physician. 

Jas. McDowell Lexington, Va General Structure of .Anatomy. 

Thomas B. Steele Cambridge, Md Hernia. 

George Golder Baltimore, Md De Digitali Herba. 

Wm. J. Barry " " Dropsy. 

Frederick S. Giger... . " " { ^' Systematis Nervosi Physio- 

\ logics Historia. 

Robert T. Spence " " Hernia. 

Samuel W. Mapp Accomack Co. Va. . . .Pneumonia. 

Thomas C. Atkinson. .Baltimore, Md Gun Shot Wounds. 

Christopher Johnson . . " " Vibratory Motion. 

Sydenham R. Clarke. . " " Fractures. 

Edwin C. Baldwin " "■ Opium. 

T. B. Horwitz " " Influence of Atmosphere on Life. 

Wm. C. Rutland Dover, Tenn Congestive Fever. 

R. Melville French Franklin Co. Pa 

The Honorary Degree of M. D. was conferred upon David L. McGugin, 
Esq., Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 



lAIAMLAND COLLEGE O;*^ PHARMACY. 



The Maryland College of Pharmacy was incorporated in 
1841, in pursuance of a request, emanating from a general 
meeting of the Apothecaries of Maryland, called during the 
spring of 1840, for that purpose. The object of the Association 
is the encouragement of the sciences of Chemistry and Phar- 
macy, by promoting an interchange of ideas upon these subjects 
among its members, discouraging the sale of inferior and adul- 
terated medicines, and distinguishing between those who have 
and those who have not a competent knowledge of those sciences. 
Its members are the most influential and successful Pharma- 
ceutists of our State, the unanimous vote of the Board of Trus- 
tees being necessary for an election. The Faculty of Physic of 
the University of Maryland have provided the Institution with 
an apartment for their regular meetings, and their next annual 
Course of Lectures will be delivered in the University building. 

OFFICERS OF THE MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 

President. 
Benjamin Rush Roberts. 

Pice Presidents. 

George Wansey Andrews^, M. D. 
r^^ Robert H. Coleman. 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Pharmacy 
David Stewart, M. D. 

Treasurer. 
Israel J. Grahamme. 

Board of Exauiiners. 

David Stewart, M. D. 

\V. S. Reese, 

J AS. Van Dyke Stewart. 

Secretary. 

RUFUS P. RlTTLEFIELD. 






^x 
>x 

'Xi 

^x 

'X 
■X 

^x 



>x^ 
^x^ 
^x< 



MEDICAL READING ROOM 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Sanctioiuir aiii Potroiiijeir bn il]t lainhv. 

H. COLBURN, M.D. 

174 BALTIMORE STREET, 









I: 



At the suggestion of the Medical Faculty of the University of y^< 



Maryland, will have fitted up immediately, one of the rooms in 
the College buildings, for a Reading Room, which will be sup- 
plied with the principal American and English MedicalJournals; 
and should the patronage justify it. Medical Books, Papers, ^:c. 
The great advantages to students of this arrangement, by 
which intermediate hours may be profitably filled up, are so very 
obvious at first sight, as to make it unnecessary to point tliem out 

Uj in an advertisement; and the trifling expense will enable every 

X^ one to become a subscriber. 

Terms of Subscription, $2.00 for the Session, or $5.00 per 



^X^ 

^x^ 
^x^ 
^x^ 
^x^ 
^x< 

V 



■X 



vx 

'X 



annum, payable invariably in advance. 



^X< 



X 
X 

>■< 
H 

XI 

x^ 
x^ 



The proprietor will attend promptly to all orders which en 
yj close the cash, for Medical Books and Journals, or any kind of y^ 
Books or Stationery (his assortment being one of the best in the rH 




city), all of which shall be furnished at as low prices as they can 
chased in the country. Address 

H. COLBURX, 

BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER, 

174 Baltimore street, 







"X< 
X^ 

1 



ONE SHEET PERIODICAL 



ANNUAL 



CATALOGUE OF STDDEiNTS 

ATTENDING 

LECTURES IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



M^^m^^U^ oil! Mm^^l^m^< 




SESSION 1844-5, 



BALTIMOllE: 

PRINTED BY JOHN MURPHY 

No. 178 MARKET STREET. 
1845. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 



RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D., 
Professor of Obstetrics and Medical Jurisprudence. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D., 
Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 

Professor of Surgery, 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D., 
Professor of Therapeutics, Materia Mcdica, and Hygiene. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology. 

ELISHA BARTLETT, M. D., 
Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D,, 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 



«Am»®©w 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Adams, Anson T Dr. F. McMeal, Ohio. 

Ashburn, R. A Dr. Anderson, Alabama. 

Austen, Philip A Dr. Baxley, Baltimore. 

Bacon, James E Dr. Coskery, Baltimore. 

Baer, Charles J Dr. Baer, Middletown, Md. 

Baker, Alfred Baltimore Infirmary, Baltimore. 

Barton, Omar Baltimore. 

Battee, John S Baltimore Infirmary, Baltimore. 

Beckett, Truman D Dr. Hanson Penn, Pr. George's Co. Md. 

Berryman, Upton H Dr. Buckler, Baltimore. 

Brown, Alfred J Baltimore. 

Caldwell, A Baltimore. 

Carter, E. L Infirmary, Baltimore. 

Carter, Robert C Prof. Dunbar, Cecil County, Md. 

Chapman, Jonathan Baltimore. 

Cobb, William Almy Prof. Smith, Baltimore. 

Cochrane, R. M Dr. Baxter, Baltimore. 

Colburn, Edmund F Prof. Dunbar, Baltimore. 

Cooke, John Dr. Magruder, Montgomery Co. Md. 

Coskery, Joseph B Dr. Taney, Emmitsburg, Md. 

Crane, Thomas H Prof. Chew, Queen Anne's Co. Md. 

Crawford, James V Dr. Baer, Baltimore. 

Cronise, J. StoU Infirmary, Baltimore. 

Dale, Dennis J Prof. Chew, Baltimore. 

Dallam, William H Dr. Dallam, Harford Co. Md. 

Danforth, Nath. B Prof. Dunbar, Lynnfield, Mass. 

Deal, W. Grove Prof. Dunbar, Anne Arundel Co. Md. 

Donaldson, Francis Alms House, Baltimore. 

Donovan, James Prof. Chew, Washington, D. C. 

Dorsey, Nich. James Dr. Dorsey, Frederick, Md. 

Downey, John Dr. Kemp, Frederick, Md. 

Earle, John C Prof. Stewart, Queen Anne's Co. Md. 



D CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Frick, John Charles Alms House, Baltimore Comity. 

Gibson, James Dr. Brookings, . . .- Chester County, Pa. 

Oilman, Judson Prof. Smith, New Hampshire. 

Gordon, J. L. M Prof. Dunbar, Piqua, Ohio. 

Graham, H. H Baltimore. 

Grieves, J. G., M. D Cumberland, Md. 

Grove, Augustus G Dr. Shipley, Worcester County, Md. 

Hall, Edward M., M. D North Carolina. 

Hall, Barton W Shelbyville, Missouri. 

Hall, Jeremiah Dr. Baxter, Baltimore. 

Hammond, William M Baltimore County. 

Healy, Samuel, M. D New York. 

Hearn, John L Dr. Adreon, Newtoivn, Worcester, Md. 

Henry, Robert J Dr. Henry, Somerset County, Md. 

Hill, Charles H Dr. McLaughlin, Baltimore. 

Hill, Joseph H Prof. Hall, Missouri. 

Hines, Wm. Marshall Prof. Smith, Baltimore. 

Hobbs, Warner Dr. William Waters, Fredericktown, Md. 

Horwitz, Phineas J Dr. Horwitz, Baltimore. 

Houck, J. W., M. D Alms House, Baltimore County. 

Hughes, Joseph C Dr. Perkins, Washington County, Pa. 

Jamison, William D Prof. Smith, Baltimore. 

Jarboe, J. R Baltimoi'e. 

Jencks, F. H Baltimore. 

Johnson, Christ., M. D Alms House, Baltimore County. 

Jones, W. W Prof. Dunbar, Northampton County, Va. 

Keener, William H Dr. Dulin, Baltimore. 

Kent, Daniel Prof. Smith, jSnne Arundel Co. Md. 

Lawrence, George W U. S. Navy. 

Long, Wm. Jefferson Dr. Shipley, Newtown, Md. 

Marshall, Ashton A Dr. Alexander, Virginia. 

McCormick, James Dr. Giger, Baltimore. 

Miles, James H Baltimore Infirmary, St. Mary's County, Md. 

Millard, Joseph B St. Mary's County, Md. 

Mills, Thos. Franklin Prof. Dunbar, Baltimore. 

Mitchell, Frederick D Dr. Gibbons, Hagerstown, Md. 

Mitchell, Lemuel T Dr. Piggs, Berlin, Md. 

Moran, John I Prof. Dunbar, Baltimore. 

Morison, James Prof. Chew, Peterboro\ N. H. 

Motte, Francis Marion Prof. Dunbar, New Orleans. 



C\T\lA)(iVK. OF STUDENTS. 
NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDEiNCE. 

Nelson, Nathan Dr. Sim, Liberty, Md. 

Owen, Charles W Dr. Miltenberger, Baltimore. 

Owings, S. Kennedy Dr. Owings, Baltimore. 

Palmer, John W Prof. Dunbar, Baltimore. 

Peabody, William F Prof. Chew, Baltimore. 

Piggot, Aaron S Prof. Dunbar, Baltimore. 

Pinkney, Ninian, M. D U. S. Navy. 

Pleasants, R. H Baltimore. 

Ragan, William Prof. Chew, Hagcrstown. 

Readel, Worthington, Prof. Smith, Baltimore County. 

Revell, W. Theodore Dr. Sparks, Annapolis. 

Ridout, Samuel Dr. Ridout, Annapolis. 

Robinson, Alexander Dr. Robinson, Baltimore. 

Rogers, Frank Dr. Ridout, Annapolis. 

Rogers, Samuel Baltimore. 

Shipley, Jos. P. H., M. D Baltimore. 

Shipley, Geo. S. D., M. D Worcester County, Md. 

Shorb, Edmund F Dr. Shorb, Littlestown, Pa. 

Smith, Alexander Virginia. 

Smith, John D Prof. Smith, Charlemont, Mass. 

Smith, Robert M Baltimore. 

Sperry, J. Austin Prof Dunbar, Baltimore. 

Van Bibber, W. Chew Prof. Smith, Carroll County, Md. 

Warfield, Evan W Dr. Warfield, Howard District, Md. 

Wigman, Herman Infirmary, Baltimore. 

Williams, Abner, M. D North Carolina. 

Willoughby, Joseph D Dr. Clough, Easton, Talbot Co., Md. 

Willson, James H Prof. Smith, Easton, Md. 

Wingate, William L Dr. Handy, Cambridge, Md. 

Wood, John, M. D Infirmary, Indiana. 

Yeates, Henry P. P Dr. Yeates, Baltimore. 



% % ^ ^ %, ^ a 



The Faculty of Physic of the University of Maryland have the pleasure 
to announce to the Profession that the recently vacant Chair of Theory and 
Practice of Medicine has been permanently and most satisfactorily filled, by the 
appointment of a gentleman well and deservedly known as a most successful 
teacher, while many additional means of instruction have been provided for the 
several departments. The lecture rooms are spacious, comfortable, well warmed 
and ventilated ; the dissecting room airy and well lighted ; the Anatomical Mu- 
seum already abundant, annually increasing, and the Laboratory and Chemical 
Apparatus peculiarly fitted for exhibiting all the brilliant demonstrations indis- 
pensable for a satisfactory Chemical Course. The Hospital department of the 
University, in the immediate vicinity, and nearly opposite the Medical College, 
from its proximity, offers advantages for Clinical studies not to be found else- 
where. Here the student can, day by,day, watch the progress of disease and 
the operation of remedies, and become familiar with the aspect of both acute 
and chronic complaints — can not only witness surgical operations, but also, what 
is equally important, the nature and result of after treatment — advantages not to 
be obtained where the Hospital is at a distance and visited only at long inter- 
vals. For practical Anatomy the material has always been most abundant, the 
mere surplus supplying other schools. By an arrangement with the College of 
Pharmacy, the lectures upon Practical Pharmacy before that Institution will be 
delivered in the University buildings, and will thus be accessible to all who may 
desire to enjoy the advantage — attendance upon these lectures will be entirely 
optional with the student. 

The next annual Course of Lectures will commence on the last Monday of 
October, 1845, and be continued until the first day of March following. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two courses of Lec- 
tures in this institution , or one course in this after one in some other respecta- 
ble school of medicine. 

Payment for tickets will be received in the current notes of the solvent banks 
of the States where Students respectively reside. The price of board and all 
other expenses are as low in Baltimore as in any other city in the country. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, Dean. 



ONE SHEET PERIODICAL 



ANNUAL 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 

ATTENDING 

LECTURES IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 




SESSION 1845-6. 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY JOHN MURPHY 

No. 1/ B M A R K E J' S T R E i: T . 
184 6. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 



RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D., 
Professor of Ohstelrics and Medical Jurisprudence. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D., 
Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 

Professor of Surgery. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D., 
Professor of Therapeutics, Materia Medica, and Hygiene. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, 

ELISHA BARTLETT, M. D., 
Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine. 

WILLIAM POWER, M. D., 
Lecturer on Theory and Practice of Medicine. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Demonstrator of .Anatomy. 

Professor Bartlett, having obtained leave of absence for the present session, spends tlie 
winter in Europe, while Dr. Power, having received the appointment of Lecturer on the The- 
ory and Practice of Medicine, will discharge the duties of that chair until the professor returns. 



i©A^^^®®ir®@ 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Archamball, Charles S Maryland. 

Bacon, James E Dr. Coskery, Maryland. 

Baer, Caleb D Dr. J. Baer, Maryland. 

Baker, Richard B Prof. Dunbar, North Carolina. 

Baker, RichardJ Maryland. 

Baldwin, A. S Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Bartlett, M. E Maryland. 

Beale, George T Dr. H. A. Ford, Maryland. 

Bean, H. H Prof. Chew, Mai-yland. 

Beckett, Truman, M.D Maryland. 

Berryman, Upton H Dr. Buckler, Maryland. 

Bevans, F. J. D.* Dr. Williams, Maryland. 

Boggs, Samuel E., M.D Pennsylvania. 

Boone, Charles E Dr. John F. Boone, Maryland. 

Bosley, Grafton W Dr. Josiah Marsh, Maryland. 

Brown, L. W.. Dr. E. W. Theobald, Illinois. 

Buckner, Charles S., M.D Missoun. 

Caldwell, Alonzo Maryland. 

Campbell, Joseph D Virginia. 

Carlisle, James B Drs. Boerstler &, Edwards, Ohio. 

Carroll, Thomas King Prof. Chew, Maryland. . 

Carter, Richard T Dr. J. Davidson, Maryland. 

Chambersly, Isaac P Maryland. 

Clift, Francis A Dr. John F. Boone, Maryland. 

Cochrane, Robert McC Dr. Baxter, ." Maryland. 

Cooke, E. J. Dr. Bartholow, Manjland. 

Cooke, John.. Dr. Magruder^ Maryland. 

Coskery, Joseph B U. S. N Maryland. 

Dale, Dennis J Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Davidson, Andrew Drs. Boerstler &, Edwards, Ohio. 

Deal, W. Grove .Prof. Dunbar,.. Maryland. 

De Butts, John Dr. Alexander C. Robinson, Maryland. 

Donaldson, Francis .Alms House, Maryland. 

Donovan, James Infirmary, Maryland, 

Dougherty, Bernard A Dr. D. A. O'Donnell,.. Maryland. 

Downey, John Dr. E. W. Mobberly,. Maryland. 

Duhurst, Charles H Maryland. 

Edmondson, Thomas G Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. L 

N-AMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE 

Emory, Ambrose M * .Maryland. 

Follansbee, James M Prof. Sewall, .Dist. of Columbia. 

Fouike, George W ,Dr. G. D. Foulke,. Pennsylvania. 

Fowler, John E Dr. R. Lemmon, Maryland. 

Galloway, John Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Gamble Gary B Infirmary, , Maryland. 

Garry, Michael M Maryland. 

Gibson, James Dr. Brookings, Pennsylvania. 

Gibson, William Maryland. 

Gilbert, George M Dr. R. N. Wright, Delaware. 

Gillinghara, Charles Maryland. 

Gillingham, A, J Maryland. 

Goucher, John Dr. R. Sharp, Pennsylvania. 

Hall, George S Dr. Jas. Hall, Maryland. 

Hall, Jeremiah * Dr. Baxter, Maryland. 

Hall, J. Thomas Dr. Sparks, Maryland. 

Hall, Edward M., M.D North Carolina. 

Hammond, William Dr. Hammond, Missouri. 

Hawkins, Alex. S. M.D Maryland. 

Hearn, John L Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Heerman Adolphus L Alms House, Maryland. 

Heiner, John Dr. G. B. Aiken, Maryland. 

Henry, Robert J. Prof. Dunbar, ..Maryland. 

Hill, Charles H Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Hinckley, Hargrove .Dr. Alexander C. Robinson,. . . .Maryland. 

Hines, William M Prof. Smith, ..Maryland. 

HoUoway, William Maryland. 

Hood, Charles H Practitioner Ohio. 

Howard, Cornelius Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Hussey, William S. L Dr. James S. Stevenson, Maryland. 

I'Anson, William H. Maryland. 

Jones, AVilliatti W Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Keerl, Henry Maryland. 

Keller, Daniel Maryland. 

King, Vincent O. Infirmary, Dist. of Columbia. 

Kinkle, James G Dr. Charles McGill, Maryland. 

Knight, Granville S Dr. S. T. Knight, Maryland. 

Knighton, John W , Maryland. 

Laroque, Alfred Dr. E. J. Chaisty, Maryland. 

Lilly, H. A Dr. C. N. Berlochy, Pennsylvania. 

Long, William J Prof. Smith,.... Maryland. 

Lovegrove, Daniel Maryland. 

Lyles, Wm. D Prof Smith, Maryland. 

Lynch, Thomas A Prof Dunbar, Mabav^a. 

Marbury, William Dr. Grafton Tyler, Dist. of Columbia. 

Marraillion, E. B Prof. Smith, Louisiana. 



U CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Marshall, Ashton A., M.D '. Virginia. 

Marshall, Henry Pennsylvania. 

Matthews, Alexander Dr. Grafton Tyler, Dist. of Columbia. 

Maund, Frederick Prof. Dunbar, Maryland, 

McCormick, James L Dr. Giger, Maryland. 

Mclntire, G. W Dr. J. Mclntire, Mainland. 

McParlin, Thomas A Dr. Claude, Maryland. 

Middleton, John D Dr. F. R. McManus, Maryland. 

Millard, Joseph B Dr. Edelin, Maryland. 

Mills, Sylvanus Dr. Nelson, Maryland. 

Mills, Thomas F Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Mitchell, Frederick D Dr. Gibbons, Maryland. 

Mitchell, Lemuel Dr. Miller, Maryland. 

Morison, James Infirmary, Maryland. 

Morris, Lewis W Dr. Lemmon, Maryland. 

Myers, John J Drs. Smith & Healey, Maryland. 

Neilson, Thomas Maryland. 

Page, J. W Prof. Dunbar, Maine. 

Palmer, John W Prof. Dunbar, .Maryland. 

Partridge, Frank E Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Paul, C. D. H Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Peabody, William F Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Pierce, W. Allen Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Pottenger, Thomas W Dr. Cronise Maryland. 

Prentiss, John H » Maryland. 

Raley, James T. M Dr. Garner, Maryland. 

Readel, Walter W Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Reese, Levi R Maryland. 

Revell, W. Theodore Dr. G. W. Miltenberger, Maryland. 

ReindoUar, WilHam Dr. Swope, Maryland. 

Richardson, Marcus D Dr. Darby, Kentucky.. 

Richardson, S. S Maryland. 

Ridgely, Benjamin Rush Maryland. 

Ridout, Samuel Dr. Ridout, Maryland. 

Rogers, Samuel O .... .Dr. James H. Murray, Maryland. 

Russell, Charles Dr. Alexander C. Robinson,. . . .Maine. 

Schley, Fairfax Infirmary, Maryland. 

Shipley, Nimrod O Dr. E. W. Mobberly, Maryland. 

Shorb, Edmund F Prof. Smith, Pennsylvania. 

Smith, Alexander Virginia. 

Smith, John D Prof. Smith, Massachusetts. 

Somers, Samuel R Dr. R. Lemmon, Maryland. 

Speck, Frederick, Dr. James Speck, Pennsylvania. 

Sperry, J, Austen Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Steinhofer, Christian Maryland. 

Swan, Charles F. B.. Dr. James M. Smith, Maryland. 



REGULATIONS, FEES, ETC. 
NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDE>fCK. 

Taylor, I. F Drs, Boerstler'Sc Edwards, Ohio. 

Thomas, James Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Todd, George W Dr. W. H. Waiies, Maryland. 

Tucker, W. McK. M.D Dist. of Columbia. 

Turner, James H Dr. J . L. Gibbons, Maryland. 

Tilghman, S. R. M.D Maryland. 

Van Wyck, J. C Dr. Theobald, Maryland. 

Wagenhals, P. M Drs. Boerstler & Edwards, Ohio. 

Walker, John Maryland. 

Ward, N. B -, Dr. Giger, Maryland. 

Webster, H. W Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Webster, Richard H Maryland. 

White, John Randolph Dr. Garner, Maryland. 

Wilkins, Joseph Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Willoughby, J. D Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Wilison, James H Prof. Smith, Maryland.^ 

Wiseman, C Maryland. 

* Deceased since the commencement of the session. 



REGULATIONS, FEES, &c. 

The Faculty of Physic of the University of Maryland being desirous to 
reduce the expenses of their students to the standard that has been adopted in 
the neighboring cities, have materially lowered their fees, making the School 
with its present charges the cheapest in this region, if we take into account the 
trifling expenses here in the study of Practical Anatomy, the free Clinical 
instruction, and other advantages. For the information of gentlemen at a dis- 
tance, it may be proper to state that the College Buildings were erected many 
years since, without restriction as to cost, for the express purpose for which they 
have since been occupied, and in point of convenience and comfort are unsur- 
passed by any in the country. The Lecture Rooms are spacious, comfortable, 
well warmed and ventilated ; the Dissecting Room airy and well lighted ;. the 
Anatomical Museum, already abundant, annually increasing, and.the Laboratory 
and Chemical Apparatus peculiarly fitted for exhibiting all the brilliant demon- 
strations indispensable for a satisfactory Chemical Course. Important additions 
to the departments of Anatomy, Surgery and Chemistry are also expected, hav- 
ing been ordered through Prof. Bartlett, now in Europe, who will bring with 
him on his return whatsoever of new or interesting the progress of European 
Medicine offers. 

The Hospital department of the University, in the immediate vicinity, and 
nearly opposite the Medical College, from its proximity, offers advantages for 
Clinical studies not to be found elsewhere. Here the student can, day by day, 
watch the progress of disease and the operation of remedies, and become fa- 



O REGULATIONS, FEES, ETC. 

miliar with the aspect of both acute and chronic complaints — can not only wit- 
ness Surgical operations, but also, what is equally important, the nature and result 
of after treatment — advantages not to be obtained where the Hospital is at a dis- 
tance and visited only at long intervals. For practical Anatomy the material has 
always been most abundant and cheap, constituting this city in that respect the 
Paris of America, the mere surplus supplying other schools. By an arrange- 
ment with the College of Pharmacy, the Lectures upon Practical Pharmacy be- 
fore that institution, will be delivered in the University buildings, and will thus 
be accessible to all who may desire to enjoy the advantage. Attendance upon 
these lectures will be entirely optional with the student. 

The next annual Course of Lectures will commence on the last Monday of 
October, 1846, and be continued until the first day of March following. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two courses of Lec- 
tures in this institution ; or one course in this after one in some other respectable 
school of Medicine. 

Each must present to the Dean of the Faculty a thesis of his own composition 
on some medical subject, and exhibit to the Faculty, satisfactory evidence of his 
professional attainments. 

If, after examination for a degree, any candidate, on ballot, shall be found to 
have received three negative votes, he shall be entitled to a fresh examination. 
Should he decline this, he may withdraw his thesis, and not be considered as 
rejected. 

The degree will not be conferred upon any candidate who absents himself 
from the public commencement, except by special permission of the Faculty. 

The fee for the ticket of each professor is fifteen dollars, making the total of 
expenses for the lectures ninety dollars. 

Matriculation fee five dollars. Graduation fee for the diploma twenty dollars. 

The Clinical ticket is furnished without charge. Practical Anatomy is taught 
by the Demonstrator, the fee for whose course is ten dollars. Attendance, 
although not obligatory, is strongly recommended as highly desirable by the 
Faculty. 

Payment for tickets will be received in the current notes of the solvent banks 
of the States where Students respectively reside. The price of board and all 
other incidental expenses are as low in Baltimore as in any other city in the 
country, and lower than in any more southern city. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, Dean. 



O N' E SHE i: r PERIODICAL. 



A N N U A Tv 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



ATTENDING 



tECTJi'iEi m Tm mm^^^i mfmimmi 



m%%ii}tvmtvt of 3^arj>lantr- 




SESSION 1846-7 



BALTIMORE: 

rp I N T E D AT N E I L S N ' S F r I C E 

No. 6 \orlh Charles street. 
1847' 



[F/aoyiLTY OF PMYSce 



RICHARD WILMOT HALL, M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Medical Jurisprudence. 

^VILLL\M E. A. AIKIN, M. D., L, L. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 

Professor of Surgery. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D., 

Professor of Therapeutics^ Materia Medica, and Hygiene. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy and Physiology. 

WILLIAM POWER, M. D.. 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 



®^^^^II»®®W11@ 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Abell, William M Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Austin, Henry., Prof. Dunbar, England. 

Baldwin, A. S Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Barrett, William E Dr. C. N. Berluchy, Pennsylvania. 

Bean, H.H Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Berry, B Dr. Brooke, Maryland. 

Bird, William P Dr. Benjamin L. Bird, Maryland. 

Bond, Benson Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Boone, Charles E Dr. John S. Boone, Maryland. 

Bosley, Grafton W Bait. Alms House, Maryland. 

Brien, Luke Tiernan Dr. Theobald, Maryland. 

Brown, L. W Dr. Theobald, Missouri. 

Brown, S Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Bryan, James L Prof. Bond, Virginia. 

Burlingame, William Maryland. 

Byrne, John M. D Maiyland. 

Cabaniss, T. T Dr. John Nicholson, Virginia. 

Carlisle, J. B Drs. Boerstler & Edwards,.. 0/i/o. 

Carrico, Thomas A Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Carter, Richartl T Dr. James Davidson, .Maryland. 

Carpenter, James A. S Dr. Henry Carpenter, Pennsylvania. 

Chamberlain, J. K Prof. Bond, Maryland. 

Chapman, Jolin S Dr. Baxley, Maryland. 

Clabaugh, Theodore F Dr. Tyler, Maryland. 

Clagett, Grafton A Dr. H. Cbgolt, Maryland. 

Clift, Francis A Dr. Boone, Maryland. 

Cochran, William W Dr. Dalrymple, Maryland. 

Cochran, F. A Maryland. 

Coclirane, S. D Dr. Tomkins Maryland. 

Cohen, Henry M Dr. Selden 8c Son, Virginia. 

Cook, E. J Dr. Bartholo, Maryland. 

Crane, William M Dr. Crane, Maryland. 

Crane, Thomas H. M. D Maryland. 



4 CATALOGUE Of STUDENTS. 

NAMKS. PRECF.PTORS. llESTDENCK. 

Culler, J. J Prof. Dunbar, Maniland. 

•' Davidson, Andrew Drs. Boerstler Si Edwards,. O/n'o, 

Davidson, C. H. W Dr. James Davidson, Maryland. 

Daugherly, Thomas Dr. Inloes, Maryland. 

De Butts, John , Dr. Alex. C. Robinson,. ..Maryland. 

V Dorsey, Nicholas J Dr. Lloyd Dorsey, Maryland. 

• Doughcity, Bernard A Dr. D. A. O'Donnell, Maryland. 

Duke, Augustus W — Maryland. 

Eareckson, Roderick W D.r. Samuel Harper, Maryland. 

Ebaugh, Andrew J Dr. Wells, Maryland. 

Edeleii, Edward Y Djf. Queen, Maryland. 

Edmunds, Thomas H Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Fergusson, Oscar A Prof. Sm,ith, Maryland. 

Fitzhugh, William H Dr. Frederick Dorsey,. . . .Maryland, 

Fleming, John P Dr. Perlvins, Maryland. 

yj Fowler, John E Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

V Galloway, John Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Gamble, Cary M . D Florida. 

Gibson, John C Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

** Gilbert, George M Prof. Wright, Delaware. 

Gough, Richard T Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Griffith, J. P Drs. Stanley h. Jones, Pennsylvania. 

Gunter, Enos F. Dr. Gillespie, Virginia. 

Haig, VVilHam Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

V Hall, Thomas J Dr. Sparks, Maryland. 

V Hamilton, Summerfield P Dr. James Higgins, Maryland. 

^ Hammond, William Bait, Infirmary, Missouri. 

HancQ, Thomas C Prol'. Chew, Maryland. 

Harlin, J . M Dr. Thompson, Virginia. 

Hay, John .Dr. Jacob Hay, Pennsylvania. 

, Hemming, Edward F Dr. Jones, PennsyliHinia. 

** Hinkley, Hargrove Dr. Alex. C. Robh ison,. . .Maryland. 

Howard, Cornelius Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Hubbard, Socrates Dr. Cronise, New York. 

Hurtt, Edward Dr. Hurtt, Maryland. 

■ Jackson, Samuel R Dr. I'arrosv, Virginia. 

Jewett, J. Cushing Dr. Giger, Maryland. 

Johnson, James T Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Jones, E S Dr. ]Jush, Maryland. 

Jones, S. J, .Dr. Whilflock ...Virginia. 

Kane, ]'. B ..'')r. Jt;hn-u)n, .Virginia 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. O 

NAMES. PRECKPTOKS. • KESinENf F. 

Keen, Thomas W Dr. Wade, Virginia. 

J Keenan, Joseph A Prof. Chew, .Maryland. 

V Keller, Daiiiel Maryland. 

V King, Vincent O Bait. Tnfinnary, />/■«/. of Columbia. 

J Kinkle,J. C Dr. Charles McGill, Maryland. 

Kimball, J . V Pennsylvania, 

Knight, Granville S , Maryland. 

Krozer, John J. R U. S. N. Hospital, Virginia. 

Larkin, William D. L Dr. Stephenson, Maryland. 

\ Laroque, Alfred. Dr. E. J. Chaisty, Maryland. 

Lester, S.hipley, Jr, Prof. Hall, Maryland. 

'^ Lilly, H. A Dr. C. N. Berluchy, Pennsylvania. 

Long, "William Jefferson Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Lnmsdon, William O Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Lyles, William D Dr. James Higgins, Maryland. 

^ Lynch, Thomas A Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Mace, Samuel V Ur. .James Aitken, Marylavd. 

J Mackenzie, John C Ealt. Alms House, Maryland. 

•/ Mackall,R.C ])r L. Mackail, Virginia. 

_ Mahon, Ormsby S l^iof Dunbar, Pennsylvania 

^ Marcy, y. M, p Dr. S. S. Marcy, New Jersey. 

"^ Marmillion, E. R , Pro,f Smith, Lniii>iiana. 

Marshall, Jacob K Georgia. 

\J Matthews, Alexander Bait. Infirmary, Bisl. of Columbia 

Maiind, Frederick Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Mayer, Frank Maryland. 

McCune, JamePt D^-. Alex. Stewart, Pennsylvania. 

McLauohlin^ John A Dr. James H. Miller,. . .Pennsylvania. 

i McParlin, Thomas A Dr. D. Claude, Maryland. 

McPherson, William M. D , Maryl'tnd. 

McPher.ion, William S Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

McSherry, R. M. D Virginia. 

^ Middleton, John D Dr. McManus, Maryland 

Mills, Sylvanus B Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Milchell, George L Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

* Mitchellj Lemuel P Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Moore, G. A Dr. Houck, Maryland. 

^ Morris, Louis \V Prof Smith. Maryland. 

Mudd, George D Dr. H. P. Mudd Missouri. 

Opllig, Francis A Dr. John Ocllig Pennsylvania. 

Usbiirn, Aba(-r Dr. Heaton, ]'iri;iuia. 



t) CATALOGUE OF SlUDENTS. 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE, 

Owens, Augustus G. ^V Dr. Thomas Owens,. . . Virginia. 

Page, J. W Prof. Dunbar, Maine, 

Partridge, Frank ^ Prof. Smith, Maryland- 
Pan], C. H. D Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

" Pierce, W. Allen Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Pindell, William N Dr. J. L. Gibbons, Maryland. 

Plaster, G E Dr. Thomas Leith, Virginia. ' 

• Pottenger, Thomas W Dr. Cronise, Maryland. 

Prentiss, John H Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Price, Elias C Dr. Price, Maryland. 

Raborg, C. M. D Maryland. 

Reese, Levi R Maryland. 

Reems, Thomas Maryland. 

Reindollar, William Dr. S wope, Maryland. 

' Revell, William Theodore Dr. E . Sparks, Maryland. 

Rhea, John L Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Rich, Arthur J Dr. Rich, Maryland. 

Ridgely , Aquilla T ". Maryland. 

'^ Ridgely, B.Rush Dr. Buck, Maryland. 

Rivers, Philip Dr. Giger, Maryland. 

Robinson, Alexander M. D Maryland. . 

Rogers, S. J. S .Maryland. 

Sappington, Sidney A. . . .' Dr. Thos. Sappington, .Maryland. 

Scott, P. E Dr. Brooke, Maryland'. 

Slingluif, R. H. ,Dr. Giger, Maryland. 

Smith, Alexander L , Virginia. 

Smith, B. B Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Smith, John S , Dr. Jones,. Maryla'nd. 

• Smith, Thomas H. L Prof. Chew, 3fississippi. 

Snyder, Benjamin C. M. D Illinois. 

Somers, Samuel R Prof. Dunbar, 3Iaryland. 

Spence, Ara Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

• Sperry, J. Austin Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Staley, J. C .Dr. Snyder, Illinois. 

Stephens, J. G .Dr. Brown, Virginia. 

Stump, William Henry Dr. S. J. Ramsay,. . . Maryland. 

• Swan, Charles F. B Dr. James M. Smith,. Maryland. 

• Thomas, James Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Thomas, J. D Dr. John Lambcit, . . .Maryland. 

Thornc, John.' England. 

V Todd, George W Prof. Chew, Maryland. 



REGULATIONS, TEES, ETC. f-^^ -7 

/ 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Tomlinson, G. R •..•.• Maryland, 

Trugien, John W. II .Dr. J. A. Schoolfiekl,. .Virginia. 

Turner, James II. Bait. Alms House, . . Maryland. 

Van Lear, Bartholomew Dr. Otho J. Smith, . . .Maryland. 

Van Wyck, John C .Dr. Theobald, Maryland. 

Wagenhals, P. M Bait. Infirmary, Ohio. 

Ward, N< B Dr.Giger, .Maryland. 

Ward, O, V Dr. F. G. Montgomery,7iu?n/Mc/cy. 

Ward, W. W Prof. Chew,. North Carolina. 

Waugh, John W. . . . • . . .Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Webster, Richard H Prof. Smith, ....... .Maryland. 

Welsh, R. S .Dr. Cornthwaite, Maryland. 

White, Jacob Dr. Smith, . Virginia. 

White, John Randolph Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Wickes, Joseph A Dr. Wroth, Maryland. 

Williams, M. D Dr. M. D. Williams, . . Virginia. 

Williams, Thomas H.. * Dr. A. H. Bayly, . . . .Maryland. 

Willoughby, J. D .'. . . .Prof. Smith, . ...-. .^ . , .Maryland, 

Wilkins, Joseph, Prof. Smith,.. Maryland. 

Worthington, James Prof. Smith, Maryland, 



REGULATIONS, FEES, &c. 

The Faculty of Physic of the University of Maryland b^ing desirous to 
reduce the expenses of their students to the standard that has been adopted in the 
neighboring cities, have materially lowered their fees, making the School wuth its 
present charges the cheapest in this region, if we take into account the trifling 
expenses here in the study of Practical Anatomy, the free Clinical instruction, and 
other advantages. For the information of gentlemen at a distance, it may be pro- 
per to state that the College Buildings were erected many years since, without 
restriction as to cost, for the express purpose for which they have since been oc- 
cupied, and in point of convenience and comfort are unsurpassed by any in the 
country. The Lecture Rooms are spacious, comfortable, well warmed and ven- 
tilated ; the Dissecting Room airy and well lighted ; the Anatomical Museum, al- 
ready abundant, annually increasing, and the Laboratory and Chemical Apparatus 
peculiarly fitted for exhibiting all the brilliant demonstrations indispensable for a 
satisfactory Chemical Course. 



N REGULATIONS, FEES, ETC. 

The Hospital department of the University, in the immediate vicinity, and near- 
ly opposite the Medical College, from its proximity, offers advantages for Clinical 
studies not to be found elsewhel-e. Here the student can, day by day, writch the 
progress of disease and the operation of remedies, and become familiar with 
the aspect of both acute and chronic complaints — can not only witness Surgical 
operations, but also, what is equally important, the nature and result of after treat- 
ment — advantages not to be obtained where the Hospital is at a distance and vis- 
ited only at long intervals. For practical Anatomy the material has always been 
most abundant and cheap, constituting this city in that respect the Paris of Amer- 
ica, the mere surplus supplying other schools. By an arrangement with the Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, the Lectures upon Practical Pharmacy before that institution, 
will be delivered in the University buildings, and will thus be accessible to all 
who may desire to enjoy the advantage. Attendance upon these lectures will hd 
entirely optional with the student. 

The next annual Course of Lectures will commence on the last Monday of Oc- 
tober, 1847, and be continued until the first day of March following. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two courses of Lectures 
in this institution; or one course in this after one in some other respectable schodl 
of Medicine. 

Each must present to the Dean of the Faculty a thesis of his own composition 
on some medical subject, and exhibit to the Faculty, satisfactory evidence of his 
professional attainments. 

If, after examination for a degree, any candidate, on ballot, shall be found to 
have received three negative votes, he shall be entitled to a fresh examination. — 
Should he decline this, he may withdraw his thesis, and not be considered as re- 
jected. 

The degree will not be conferred upon any candidate who absents himself from 
the public commencement, except by special permission of the Faculty. 

The fee for the ticket of each professor is fifteen dollars, making the total of ex- 
penses for the lectures nbieiy dollars. 

Matriculation fee five dollars. Graduation fee for the diploma twenty dollars. 

The Clinical ticket is furnished without charge. Practical Anatomy is taught 
by the Demonstrator, the fee for whose course is ten dollars. Attendance, although 
not obligatory, is strongly recommended as highly desirable by the Faculty. 

Payment for tickets will be received in the current notes of the solvent banks 
cf the States where Students respectively reside. The price of board and all other 
incidental expenses are as low in Baltimore as in any other city in the country. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, Dean, 



9\ 



F R T Y - F I K S T 






ansaigaii, saassiiias 



OF THE 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



HniucrBitg of Marnlanlr* 



I! 




B A L T 1 M O Jl F: : 

JOHN \\ . WOODS, P K 1 N T K R . 






A 



One Sheet PeriofliaiL 



FORTY-FIRST 



igLiaaiiBSLiia !Ba[EiB03iL£LS 



OF THE 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



Hniutvsitg of illarglantr. 



SESSION 1848-'9. 



BALTIMORE: 

JOHN W . WOODS, PRINTER 

1848. 



ASHTON ALEXANDER, M. D., Provost. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 
Jlrofessor of Surgery. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D., LL. D. 
Professor of Cljemistrg anb pijarmarn. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 
Professor of (El)era|jeutks, iHateria iHebica anb i^ggiene. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 
Professor of !^natomg. 

WILLIAM POWER, M. D. 
Professor of iS^ljeorg arib practice of iHebicine. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

Professor of iHibtuiferji anh t\)C Siseases of tootnan anb 

Orijilbren. 

G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

£ectnrer on patljological ^natom^, anb Demonstrator of 

^natom^. 

WILLIAM. E. A. AIKIN. 



AN?s^UAL CIRCULAE. 



In presenting the forty-first Annual Circular of the Medical 
Department of the University of Maryland, the Faculty of 
Physic cannot refrain from congratulating the public, the pro- 
fession, and themselves, upon the present prosperous condition 
and flattering prospects of the Institution committed to their 
charge. Relieved by the generous liberality of the state legis- 
ture from a burdensome debt ; having at their disposal a place 
and means admirably adapted for purposes of public instruction, 
and feeling that the sympathies of the profession are with them, 
they are constantly stimulated and encouraged to sustain, im- 
prove and perfect the reputation of the University, and the 
course of instruction given in her halls. During her past his- 
tory the University of Maryland has always been the advocate 
of improvement and advancement. The present Faculty parti- 
cipate fully in the desire that this advancement, which an en- 
lightened profession justly imposes upon those who bestow, as 
well as those who receive, its honors, may be furthered by their 
efforts. With this object in view, they have been led to extend 
the term and increase the amount of instruction, and to change, 
in some respects, the requirements for obtaining a degree. Hav- 
ing held, for several years, sessions of six months, which they 
were compelled to abandon, in consequence of the non-confor- 
mity of other schools, they do not feel that an extension of the 
session to that length is at present expedient. Neither do they 
regard as advisable a merely nominal increase in the form of 
^'introductory," "supplementary" or "additional course." They 
have, therefore, preferred to provide for a gradual extension of 
the session in such a manner as shall give an absolute increase 



of the amount as well as term of instruction, without being bur- 
densome to those students who have already commenced their 
education: the next session will, therefore, be continued till the 
fifteenth day of March. 

With an Institution under their personal control, the Balti- 
more Infirmary, admirably calculated to furnish material for 
Clinical Instruction, the Faculty consider it absolutely essential 
that every pupil who resorts to the School should avail himself 
of its advantages. They have, therefore, made a Clinical 
ticket imperative, and will require, from all candidates for grad- 
uation, evidence of attendance, during two sessions, upon a 
course of Clinical Instruction. In this School the Clinical 
ticket is furnished to all matriculates without charge. 

The facilities for prosecuting Anatomical studies have been 
increased by the introduction of gas into the rooms, thus 
enabling the student to pursue his dissection during a part of 
the day not occupied by lectures. Convinced of the absolute 
necessity of a correct knowledge of Anatomy, and aware of 
the insuperable difficulties which attend its practical study after 
entering upon active professional life, the Faculty, after much 
reflection, have decided upon making attendance upon one 
course of Practical Anatomy obligatory. The Faculty are 
willing to rest the wisdom of imposing this obligatory attend- 
ance in the Dissecting Room upon the judgment not only of 
those who constitute the profession now, but upon the judg- 
ment of their own pupils, when experience and the exigencies 
of medical practice shall have taught them the necessity and 
utility of Anatomical study. 

In addition to the study of Practical Anatomy, it has been 
thought desirable, that the changes induced by disease should 
be more fully described and demonstrated than has been done 
heretofore. To this end a Lectureship of Pathological Anatomy 
has been instituted, attendance upon which during one session 
will be required. The Faculty h^ve placed this Department in 
the hands of a gentleman, who, they feel confident, will spare 
no pains to make it an object of attraction and utility. In the 
present condition of Medical Science something more is re- 



quired of the educated physician than a vague impression that 
''pain, heat, redness and swelling," constitute inflammation ; 
that tubercle is "a round," and cancer "a hard" mass: he must 
know how to distinguish by their special characteristics the 
great elementary forms of disease. These it is the office of 
Pathological Anatomy to exhibit and unfold, so that the appre- 
ciation of disease during life may be followed by the recogni- 
tion of its true nature after death. 

Whatever may be the abilities of its Faculty, the reputation 
of a School must depend, in a good degree, upon the character 
of those who resort to its halls. Without any attempt to flatter 
the pride or the vanity of the subjects of its commendation, the 
Faculty recall, with real pleasure, the honorable conduct, gen- 
eral industry and intelligence which have characterized the 
classes of the University during the period of their connection 
with it : qualities, which while they render agreeable the labors 
of a public teacher, aflford him assurance that the pupils, with 
whose preliminary training he is identified, will become, in due 
time, the ornaments of an honorable and responsible profession: 
a profession in which the three great requisites for success are, 
a good mind, good morals, and good manners. 



The Course of Instruction in the particular Departments is 
comprised in the following schedule: 

I. SURGERY. 

Prof. NATHAN R. SMITH. 

The chair of Surgery includes the Principles and Practice of Surgery. Surgery is 
regarded, taught and treated as a practical art, founded upon plain, intelligible and 
rational principles. The whole object of the teacher is to enforce aud illustrate these 
principles: so that in the emergencies of actual practice, the thing to be done, and 
the way to do it, may be clearly known and promptly applied. Believing that to be 
appreciated, all public teaching should be as practical and demonstrative as possible, 
it will be the constant endeavor of the Professor to convert abstract doctrine into pal- 
pable fact, by the citation of illustrative examples, and the exhibition of real in- 
stances. The wards of the infirmary will enable him to do this to a very considera- 
ble extent : and he will have recourse to his own collection of casts, drawings and 
preparations for further assistance. Having been actively engaged in the practice 
of Surgery for many years, he has gathered together much material for illustrating a 
Surgical course. During the past season, a considerable collection of French models 
1* 



has been ordered, and a large number of drawings and casts have been added to the 
suite of preparations, 

{ Clinical lectures are given at the Infirmary in addition to the regular course, and 
such cases as require to be operated upon .are exhibited, and the operations per- 
formed in presence of the class. •'.?{' J? ' ■ 

Books of reference in this department : Druitt's Surgery, Liston's Surgery, Sir Ast- 
ley Cooper's Lectures, Velpeau's Surgery /Chelius. 



II. CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

Prof. WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN. 

As it is necessary for the student to understand the elementary ])rinciples of the 
science of Chemistry, before he can comprehend their application to the wants of 
medicine, the lectures in this department will commence with the consideration of 
these principles. The laws of affinity, the various circumstances that modify the 
Chemical relations ofelementary and compound particles, the nomenclature of Chemis- 
try and the use of Chemical symbols as the written language of the science will be first 
presented. The properties and phenomena of Caloric, Light, Electricity and Gal- 
vanism will be discussed, in relation to their practical bearing on the studies and the 
duties of the physician, a full and comprehensive consideration of these topics be- 
longing rather to the subject of Natural Philosophy. Next in order, the properties of 
the various elementary bodies will be examined, selecting those only that exist in the 
various compounds possessing any interest to the medical student, and passing very 
cursorily over those that are found only as constituents of a few unimportant sub- 
stances of rare occurrence. The Pharmaceutical processes of the Pharmacopceia will 
be explained in full, and the Chemical reactions concerned in those processes made 
manifest. The incompatibles of all the important medicinal substances will be no- 
ticed, and the cause of such incompatibility experimentally shown. 

The various reagents., and the best processes for detecting the mineral poisons will' 
be exhibited, and the relations of Chemistry to Toxicology pointed out. The Chem- 
istry of organic bodies will occupy a prominent part of the course embracing the 
characteristics of all the important proximate elements of the animal and vegetable 
structure, both solids and fluids, so far as these have any bearing, or can throw any 
light on the functions of the human system in health and disease. For these various 
purposes the apparatus in this department, which is believed to be unequalled by that 
of any other institution in the country, will afford every facility. As an experimental 
science, Chemistry can only be successfully taught, by having recourse continually 
to experimental illustrations, and these will be constantlj^ employed whenever admis- 
sible, in a manner to make the lectures instructive and impressive. 

Books of reference in this department: Turner's Chemistry, Graham's Chemis- 
try, Fowue's Chemistry, United States Dispensatory. 



m. GENERAL THERAPEUTICS, MATERIA MEDICA, AND 
HYGIENE. 

Prof. SAMUEL CHEW. 

In this department, the topics that first occur are the doctrines of General Thera- 
peutics. together with the applications, mode of action, and effects of medicines. 
The various methods of classifying remedial agents are considered, and an arrange- 



ment of them adopted in reference to the nature of their action on the living body. 
The character and Therapeutic uses of the several classes are fully detailed. The in- 
dividual agents of which they consist, are examined in the order of their relative 
value and importance. A brief account is given of the natural history of each one 
of them, and of its commercial history, and Chemical composition. A more extend- 
ed view is presented of the effects which each is capable of producing on the healthy 
living body, and especial attention is bestowed to designate the precise nature of its 
action. The various diseases are noticed, in which each has been employed. From 
the nature of those diseases, and from the general character of the agent, are de- 
duced, as far as practicable, the philosophy of its application in each malady, and 
the explanation of its effects, whether salutary or injurious. The discussion of the 
Therapeutic employment of remedies, constitutes the most extensive, as it is the most 
important, portion of the course. 

Care is used throughout to compare and harmonize the established facts of Clinical 
observation with the conclusions legitimately derived from Physiology and Patholo- 
gy ; and the necessity is inculcated of avoiding the opposite errors of dogmatic at- 
tachment to theoretic reasoning on the one hand, and blind submission to imperfect 
and mistaken experience on the other. 

The lectures on Hygiene comprise a view of the manner in which physical agents 
act upon the human body, so as to promote the proper performance of its functions, 
and produce health ; the manner in w^hich those agents act upon the body so as to 
disorder or interrupt its functions and produce disease; and the manner in which the 
action ot those agents may be so regulated as to secure their good effect, the main- 
tenance of health, and prevent their ill effect, the production of disease. The causes 
of health and disease which influence mankind in general having been considered, 
the nature and effects of those causes are pointed out which act upon the health of 
particular classes of men, in consequence of their peculiar trades and vocations. The 
course concludes with an account of the effects of climate, and of the peculiarities 
with regard to health and diseases which arise from difference of sex, and which oc- 
cur at different periods of life. 

The lectures on Materia Medica will be amply illustrated by a cabinet of speci- 
mens of all the various substances described, and by an extensive collection of accu- 
rate colored engravings of medical plants, both indigenous and exotic. 

Books of reference in this department: Pereira's Materia Medica and Therapeu- 
tics, Dispensatory of the United States, Royle's ^Materia .Medica and Therapeutics, 
Pereira on Food and Diet, Combe's Physiology applied to the Preservation of Health. 



IV. ANATOMY. 

Prof. JOSEPH ROBY. 

The lectures in this department are intended to be entirely demonstrative : and as 
far as possible to teach fact, not doctrine — truth, not speculation : to develop practi- 
cal use, and to guide the student through a knowledge of the plain and palpable into 
the desire of a knowledge of the intricate and obscure. 

As the science of Anatomy is not perfect, inasmuch as the structure and use of 
many parts are still unknown, it of course cannot be, in a literal sense, perfectly 
taught. One must choose how much and in what mode he will learn and teach, and 
in this school the selection is always made with reference to the future occupation of 
the medical pupil. All aids ordinarily in use, in addition to the parts themselves, are 



8 

made available for this purpose, and all effort that can be bestowed, is bestowed 
in guiding the student in the proper path for acquiring profitable information. 

With the admirable facilities at hand for the pursirit of Practical Anatomy, it is be- 
lieved that the outline given in the public hall can be easily filled up. To this end the 
attention of the student is constantly directed, and while an attempt is made to brin*' 
before him in proper succession the different systems of which the body is composed 
in such form that he can apply his own senses to their appreciation, he is taught to 
seek confirmation and enlargement of his knowledge through the work of his own 
hands. The opportunity for doing this is all that can be desired, and such as- 
sistance as is needful constantly rendered. 

The elements of a science are the guides to the solution of its most intricate prob- 
lems. In Anatomy they are capable of thorough comprehension: the aim in this 
school is to make this comprehension clear and perfect. Public instruction is intend- 
ed to be an introduction to private study. The desire is not to coax the memory into 
retention of the barbarous nomenclature of the brain, bones and muscles, but to ex- 
hibit truths in their practical relation to the daily duties of the physician, to show 
how these truths can be best acquired, and to excite the intellect to the devotion of 
its capacities to their acquisition. 

Books of reference in this department: Wilson's Anatomy, Cruveilhier's Anatomy, 
Quain's Anatomical Plates, Carpenter's Physiology. 



V. THEORY AND PRACTICE. 

Prof. WILLIAM POWER. 

In a field so wide as that embraced by the chair of the Theory and Practice of 
Medicine, it is impossible during the term allotted to the lectures, to describe fully all 
the various diseases which fall properly within its scope. The lectures, therefore, 
from this chair, are so arranged, that while each year a general view is given of all 
the more important diseases affecting the different parts of the system, certain classes 
are dwelt upon more in detail one year, and others the next, thus making the course 
very full and complete to those who attend two sessions, and avoiding monotonous 
repetition of the same subjects. Great principles of treatment can thus be reiterated 
and enforced, in connection with different diseases, bearing certain analogies to one 
another, and the mind of the student is kept aroused by the apparent novelty of mat- 
ter presented in new relations, which might appear dull, repeated in the same form 
as the preceding year. 

The great object of instruction will be to inculcate positive and ascertained facts, 
avoiding as much as possible, all hypothetical explanations and theoretical doctrines. 
The student wants sound elementary knowledge. He must first acquire those facts 
and truths which have been really established by the labors of our predecessors, and 
the investigations of our contemporaries, before he is prepared to appreciate the 
value of the different Theories deduced from them. The teacher's object, therefore, 
will be to put him in possession of those materials which must form the basis of his 
future medical knowledge, rather than to entertain him with speculations; to arouse 
in him a spirit of patient observation, rather than of speculative reasoning. With 
this end in view, a large part of the course will consist of an accurate description of 
the natural history of diseases, their lesions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, and 
the mutual relations of these to one another: while, by plates, models, wet and dry 
preparations, and recent specimens of diseased structures, an attempt will be made to 
convey correct notions of the pathological changes occurring in different diseases. 



The Hospital of the Baltimore Infirmary belongs to the University of Maryland, 
and affords ample materials for Clinical instruction ; in other words, for teaching the 
art as well as the science of medicine. This institution is daily attended by the 
Professor, and Clinical lectures delivered by him, in addition to the regular course at 
the school. A great advantage of this institution is that it possesses a hospital of 
its own, open at all times to its students, where the truths taught in the lecture room 
may be demonstrated to the senses, and submitted to the observation of its pupils. 
It is only at the bedside that accurate diagnosis can be taught, and the shifting indi- 
cations for the use of therapeutical means nicely discriminated. The important art 
of physical diagnosis, particularly m diseases of the chest, will be largely dwelt upon, 
and every pains taken to give the students such practical demonstrative instruction 
as may enable them to apply it with profit hereafter. 

Books of reference in this department : Chomel's General Pathology, Wood's 
Practice of Medicine, Watson's Lectures on Theory and Practice, Library of Practi- 
cal Medicine, AndraPs Cliuique. 



VI. MIDWIFERY AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND 

CHILDREN. 

Prof. RICHARD H. THOIVIAS. 

In the first part of this course, as connected and practical a view as possible of the 
science of Tokology or Midwifery proper, will be presented. 

This will be best accomplished by taking up the consideration of labor as soon as 
we are prepared for it, by an acquaintance with the Anatomy and functions of the 
organs which are concerned in it, and with the fcetus in its relations to pregnancy 
and parturition. This division of the course will be illustrated by numerous paint- 
ings of large size, by models, and by the machine. 

A thoroughly practical course will be attempted, and every student who desires it, 
will have the opportunity of performing the different operations upon the machine. 
~ The'Diseases of Women, esijecially those which are consequent to, or dependent 
upon the puerperal state, will then be considered- 

The history and treatment of the diseases which are peculiar to infancy and 
childhood will conclude the course. 

Books of reference : ChurchhiU, Rigby, Ramsbotham, Velpeau, Columbat, Evanson. 
Condie. 



VII. PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY. 

G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

In accordance with the necessity, universally acknowledged, of increasing the 
means of instruction for the student, so as to keep pace, as far as possible, with tije 
rapid advance of modern medicine, the Faculty of the University of Maryland, have 
established a lectureship upon Pathological Anatomy, in addition to the facilities 
heretofore afforded to the students of this Institution. The importance of this depart- 
ment of science, the numerous observations and immense mass of facts which have 
now been accumulated, and the period of time which is generally devoted to oral in- 
struction, render it impossible that, in conjunction with its more immediate practical 
details, the chair of Theory and Practice should embrace more than special Pathology. 



10 

In order, however, that the student may come fully prepared to benefit by such in- 
struction, to appreciate, to appropriate and classify such knowledge, the principle and 
highest aim ot his pursuits, it is necessary that he should comprehend the laws of dis- 
ease, the causes, origin, course and terminations of "general morbid actions, which can 
alone offer a sure basis upon which to ground his views of practice. 

As the most important and essential preliminary, the subject of inflammation, 
its general history, progress, the various changes attending and consequent upon it, 
with its effects on the different tissues, will occupy the first, and a principal portion of 
the course. Transformations and the production of analogous tissues will naturally be 
conjoined with it, and afterwards the heterologous formations will be luily discussed. 
In all cases, every opportunity will be taken to offer to inspection recent morbid 
specimens, together with those previously collected, while all points admitting of it 
will be fully illustrated by diagrams and drawings. 



PRACTICAL ANATOMY. 

The dissecting room is in charge of the Demonstrator, who superintends and directs 
the classes in their dissections. Anatomical material is abundant, and furnished at 
moderate expense. Indeed it is doubted if any school in the country can equal the 
facilities afforded here. The rooms are convenient, well warmed, ventilated, and 
lighted with gas. 

The Demonstrator passes much time in assisting the students, and in guiding their 
labors. Access may be had to the rooms at all hours of the day, until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., when the Janitor closes them for the night. 

The Faculty wish it to be understood, that the advantages offered for the pursuit 
of Practical Anatomy are not merely nommal. They refer with pride, to the zeal 
and industry of the classes during the past session, and trust, that the opportunity for 
studying Anatomy, which none can neglect with impunity, may continue to be appre» 
ciated and improved. 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

JAMES M ORISON, M.D. Resident PhysicIa.n. 
Sister MARY CHRYSOSTOM, Sister Superior. 

The University Hospital, long known as the Baltimore Infirmary, in the immediate 
vicinity of the Medical College, furnishes ample opportunity for the Clinical observa- 
tion of disease. During the session, it is in charge of the Professor of Surgery and 
the Professor of Theory and Practice, who visit it daily, at hours convenient for the 
class. Clinical lectures are regularly given by the Professors on the cases in the 
wards. During the past session the class have had exhibited to it several important 
surgical operations, and many highly interesting cases of disease. The opportunity 
of comparing the phenomena of typhoid and typhus fever, and of testing their resem- 
blances and differences may be cited among many other instances of the advantages 
of the institution. Other acute diseases are constantly admitted, furnishing invalua- 
ble subjects for Clinical teaching. This department of the University is at present in 
a most flourishing condition, and so highly appreciated and liberally patronised, that 
it is in contemplation to enlarge it for the reception of such cases as are, at present, 
necessarily excluded on account of restricted accommodation. Under the manage- 



11 



ment of the Faculty, its internal affairs being administered by those admirable "Sis- 
ters of Charily," whose name is synonymous with kindness, care and comfort, it is 
believed, tliat no similar institution combines greater advantages for the study pi dis- 
ease, and for the acquiring of habits of observation and discrimination. 

Desirous that the benefits of this branch of the University may be extended, the 
Faculty appoint a limited number of resident pupils who are admitted to the usual 
privileges of hospital internes. The fee for which is eighty dollars per year, payable 
in advance. 

The following report of the resident physician exhibits the number and character 
of cases treated in the wards during the last year. 



Medical Cases. 

Diseases of Respiratory Sys- 
tem. 

17 

1 



Phthisis, 

Gangrene of Lungs, 
Pneumonia, 
Pleurilis, 
Bronchitis, 
Laryngitis, 
Asthma, 
Haemorrhage Lungs, 



Purpura, 
Scorbutus, 

Diseases of the 
Secretion. 
Ascites, 



3 

6 

Organs of 



Diseases of Digestive 
tern. 



Sys- 



Dyspepsia, 
Cholera Morbus, 
" Infantum, 
Acute Dysentery, 
Chronic " 
Gastro-Enteritis, 
Chronic Gastritis, 
Haemorrhage, Stom- 
ach, 3 

Diseases of Brain, Spinal 
Cord and Nervous Sys- 
tem, 

Meningitis. 2 

Mollities Cerebri, I 

Hydrocephalus, 1 

Apoplexy, 4 

Epilepsy, 5 

Hysteria, 4 

Spinal Irritation, 2 

Curvature of Spine, I 

Neuralgia, 2 

Sciatica, 2 

Tetanus, i 

Mania a Potu, 12 

Hypochondriasis, 4 
Poisoning by Laud'm,2 

Concussion of Brain, 1 

Diseases of Circulatory 
System. 

Hypertro'y of Heart, 1 

Pericarditis, 1 

Endocarditis, ] 
Valvular Disease of 

Heart, j 

Chlorosis, ] 



Hypertro. of Spleen, 12 

" of Liver, 2 

Amenorrhoea, 2 

Menorrhagia, 1 

Leucorrhoea, 4 

Metritis, I 

Peritonitis, 1 

Chronic Nephritis, 2 

Bright's Disease, 5 

Chronic Hepatitis, 2 

Acute '< 2 

Cirrhosis of Liver, 3 

Jaundice, ,3 

Ischuria, 1 



Diseases of Skin. 
Impetigo, 
Psoriisis, 
Prurigo, 
Lepra Vulgaris, 
Varicella, 
Rubeola, 
Scarlatina, 
Erysipelas, 

General Diseases, 
Typhus Fever, 
Typhoid " 
Intermittent " 
Remittent " 
Rheumatism, 
" Mercurial, 

Surs^ical Cases. 



126 

66 
51 
72 
25 
2 



Wounds and Burns. 

Wound on Face, 1 

Incised Wound of 

Pharynx, 1 

Burn of Pharynx and 

CEsophagus, 1 

Wound of Knee, I 

Abscesses, Ulcers & Tu- 
mors. 

Abscess of Kidney, 2 
Abscess Mammary, 1 

" Lumbar, 2 

<' Umbihcal, 1 

Irritable Tumor of 

Breast, 1 

Adipose Tumor Foot, 1 

" '' Arm, 1 

Carcinomatory Tumor 



Diseases Genito-Urinary Or- 
gans. 

Hydrocele, 4 

Orchitis, 4 

Carcinoma of Testis, 1 
Stricture of Urethra, 6 
Calculus of Bladder, 1 
SpermatorrlKpa, 3 

Retention of Urine, 3 
Vesico- Vaginal Fis. 

tula, 2 

Balanitis, 4 



in Breast. I 

Ulcers on Leg, 12 

Phlegmon, 2 

Empyema, 1 

Cancrum Oris, 1 

Venereal Diseases. 

Syphilis, 53 

Gonorrhoea, 11 

Syph'c Rheumatism, 4 
Gonorrhojal '' 3 

Pseudo-Syphilis, 2 

Diseases of Eye and its Aj>- 
pendages. 

Iritis, 2 

Conjunctivitis, 4 

Oplithalmia, S 

Sclerotic Staphyloma, 1 
Ulceration of Cornea, b' 
Strabismus, 2 

Pterygium, 1 

Cataract, 2 

Fractures of Femur, 6 

" Tibia and Fibula, 3 

" Com. of do. 

" Ulna, 

« Radius, 

" Ribs, 
Psuedo-Arthrosis, 
Disloca'n of KneeJt. 
Comp. of do. 



of Ankle Joint, 1 



12 



Dislocation of Ulna, ] 
«' of Radius, 2 

Sprain of Ankle, 2 

Necrosis of Ulna, 1 
" Carpal Eones, 1 
" Tarsal Bones, 1 
" Tibia, 3 

White Swelling of Knee 
Joint. 3 

White Swelling ShouL 



Fistula in Perineo, 

Paronychia, 

Onychia, 

Inverted Toe Nail, 

Periostitis, 

Hemorrhoids, 



der Joint, 
Inguinal Hernia, 
Scrotal " 
Urobilical " 
Otitis, 
Fistula in Ano, 



j Surgical Operations. 
! Operations for Necro- 
sis, 6 
j Oper'n for Cataract, 2 
" Calculus in Bladder, 1 
I " Vesico-Vagiual Fis- 
I tula. 2 
I '' Pterygium, 2 
■ " Strabismus, 2 



Oper'n Stricture of Ureth- 
ra, 7 
" Removal of Eye, 3 
'< " of Testis, 1 
" '' of Astragalus, 1 
" " Adipose Tumor 
from Arm, 1 
'< «' Adipose Tumor 
from Foot, 1 
Carcinom. Tumor, J 
Amputation of Leg, 4 
" of Thigh, 3 
Paracentesis Abdomi- 
nis, 4 
Autoplastic Opera'n, 1 
Oper'n for Hydrocele, 4 



fccB, Ucgulations for (Srabualion, ^c. 

The next course of lectures will begin on the fourth Monday (30th) of October 
18-18, and end on the 15th day of March, 1S49. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, Chemistry, Materia Medica, 
Anatomy, Theory and Practice, Obstetrics, yj/ifeen dollars each. 

The fee for the course on Pathological Anatomy is five dollars, and the fee for the 
ticket of Practical Anatomy is ten dollars. 

Every student is required to matriculate and to pay the regular fee, which is five 
dollars. No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

The matriculation and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement of 
the session. Notes of solvent banks of the states where students reside will be re- 
ceived in payment. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two full courses of lectures 
in this institution ; or one in this, after one in some other respectable medical school. 

The ticket of the lecturer on Pathological Anatomy, and the ticket of Practical 
Anatomy are required to be taken but once. 

Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Faculty, at such time as may 
be specified, a thesis, of his own composition, on some subject connected with medi- 
cal science, and satisfy the Faculty, by appearing before them in a private examina- 
tion, of his fitness for receiving the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 

The several Professors are in the habit of holding weekly public examinations 
throughout the session, attendance upon which is recommended, though not enforced. 
The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate, is based on their know- 
ledge of his .general intelligence and industry, as well as upon the result of the final 
examination. Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, continued and prolonged ab- 
sence from lectures are always regarded as obstacles to success in obtaining a degree. 

The result of an examination is determined by a majority of votes. Should the 
Faculty be equally divided the candidate may be re-examined, if he should desire it. 
If he decline a second examination, he may withdraw his thesis, and resume the posi- 
tion of a candidate in whose case no decision has been had. 

The graduation fee, (including Diploma,) is twenty dollars. 

A public commencement is held soon after the close of the examinations, under 
authority of the Provost and Regents of the University, at which the degrees are 
conferred. No candidate will be excused from attendance, but by special vote of the 
Faculty. 

IXT'T/ic Janitor, who may he found at his house on the University grounds, will 
direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The expenses of 
living are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country ; good hoard being ob- 
tainable at from %Z OQ to ^A 00 per week. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDE^^TS, 

1847-'48. 



Students. 


Preceptors. 


Residence. \ 


Abell, William M. . 


Professor Dunbar, 


. Maryland. 


Allen, Robert W. 


*< Smith, 


it 


Austin, Henry 


" Dunbar, 


. England. 


Banks, Lynn S. . . 


« (C 


Missouri. 


Barrett, William E. 


Dr. Berluchey, 


. Pennsylvania. 


Belt, W. Seton, . 


'< Lee, 


Maryland. 


Benny, Samuel P. . 


" C. C. Cox, 


(( 


Berry, Benjamin, 


Professor Chew, 


(( 


Billingsly, John A. T. . 


(( (( 


ti 


Bird, William P. . 


Dr. Bird, 


(( 


Blakistone, Richard P. . 


Professor Chew, 


(( 


Bland, Rev. Zane 




(( 


Blanton, 0. M. 


Dr. Theobald, 


. Mississippi. 


Bond, Benson 


Professor Chew, 


Maryland. 


Boone, Charles E. . 


. Dr. Boone, 


(( 


Bowie, Augustus, J. M. D. . 




United States Navy 


Brace, Russel, 


Professor Dunbar, 


New York. 


Brobston, Rev. Wm. . 




Maryland. 


Brodie, Robert J. . 


. Dr. Kelly, 


Virginia. 


Brown, Septimus, 


Professor Smith, 


. Maryland. 


Burke, Williams. . 


. Dr. Wilson, 


Virginia. 


Bean, H. H., M. D. . 




Maryland. 


Cabaniss, T. T. 


. Baltimore Infirmary, 


(t 


Carpenter, James A. S. 


Professor Chew, 


. Pennsylvania. 


Carter, George W. . 


. Dr. Dorsey, . 


. Virginia. 


Carter, Walter K. 


Dr. S. Harper, 


Maryland. 


Carrico, Thomas A. 


. Professor Chew, 


ti 


Chamberlaine, Joseph E. M. 


Dr. Muse, 


(t 


Cherbonnier, A. V. . 


. Professor Dunbar, . 


({ 


Clabaugh, Theodore F. 






Clagctt, G. A. . 


*" Chew, 


{( 


Clendinen, William H. 


Dr. Clendinen, 


il 


Collett, George W. 


. " Martin, . 


. Pennsylvania. 


Cochran, William Wecdon, 


" Dalrymple, 


Maryland. 


Cowman, Richard H. 


. " Sparks, . 


11 


Cohen, Henry M. 


Drs. Selden & Son, . 


Virginia. 


Crane, WiUiam B. . 


. Professor Chew, 


. Maryland. 


Cronmiller, Thomas Le. P. 


<' Roberts, . 


il 


Cullen, J. J. . . . 


" Dunbar, 


t( 


Cummings, Frederick S. 


Dr. Jordan, . 


Pennsylvania. 


Daugherty, Thomas 


Professor Chew, 


. Maryland. 


Davidson, C. H. W. 


Dr. J. Davidson, 


(< 


Day, Benjamin J. . 
2 


. " R. H. Day, . 


. Indiana. 



14 



students. 

De Butts, John . 
Dorsey, Edward P. 
Dorsey, W. P. 
Du Hamel, William J. C. 
^ Eareckson, Roderick W 
Ebaugh, Andrew J. 
Edelin, Alfred 
Edelin, Edward V. 
Edmunds, Thomas H. 
Emery, D. C. H. 
Farnandez, Jose Y. 
Fergussou, Oscar A. 
Fleming, John P. 
Free, John L. 
Fulton, Robert H. 

- Gibbons, Alexander S. 
• Gibson, John C. . 
-Glisan, Rodney, 

Gough, Richard T. 
Grafton, William H. 

- Gunter, Enos F. 
Haig, W^illiam 
Hammond, Thomas W 
Hance, Thomas C. 
Hardey, Thomas E. 
HarrelljWiEiamB. 
Harris, Adam C. 
Harcourt, Thomas C. 
Hay, John . 
Henderson, Samuel D. 
Hendrix, Joseph W. . 
Herbert, Alfred 
Hinkley, Edward 0. . 
Hill, Ira, M.D., 
Houck, J. W., M. D., . 
Howard, Cornelius, 
Hubbard, Socrates 
Hurtt, Edward 
Jackson, Samuel R. 
Jenkins, Felix 
Jewett, J. Gushing 
Johns, Edward W. , 
Johnson, James T. 
Johnston, Christopher, M 
Johnson, Richard P. 
Johnson, William H. 
Jones, Reuben E. 
Keenan, Joseph A. 
Knight, Granville S. 
Krozer, John J. R. 
Lake, R. P. 
Larkin, William D.F. 



Preceptors. 


Residence. 


Baltimore Alms House, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Theobald, 


u 


Professor Dunbar, 


(( 


« Chew, . 


(( 


11 ti 


IC 


Dr. Wells, . 


t( 


" H. Edelin, 


iC 


<' Queen, . 


CI 


Professor Dunbar, 


<( 


Drs. Bordley & Earle, 


(( 




Venezuela. 


Professor Smith, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Perkins, 


li 


" Free, 


Pennsylvania. 


" Fulton, 


Maryland. 




Virginia. 


Professor Chew, 


Maryland. 


" Smith, 


t( 


Dr. Mott, 


ic 


" W. A. Gillespie, 


Virginia. 


Professor Smith, 


Maryland. ' 


Dr. Sands, 


« 


Professor Chew, . 


(( 


Dr. O'Donnel, . 


u 


" J.A.Harrell, . 


North Carolina 


" Hunter, 


(( a 


" Smith, . 


Pennsylvania. 


Professor Chew, 


a 


Dr.Ellery, . 


Missouri. 


" Gerry, . 


Pennsylvania. 


" Brown, . 


(( 



Professor Smith, 

Professor Smith, . 
Dr. Farrow, 
Professor Dunbar, 

Drs. Smith & Healey, 
Professor Dunbar, 



Maryland. 



New York. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 



Maryland. 



(I tt 


tc 


Dr. Cronise, 


<t 


" Orrick, . 


(( 


Professor Chew, 


11 


Dr. Knight, . 


11 


Professor Chew, 


Virginia . 


« Dunbar, 


. Maryland 



15 



students. 

— Latimer, Benjamin C. . 
•Leach, R.V. . 
Long, William J. 
--- -Love, Eli N. 
— ' Lumsdou, Rev. Wm. 0. 

— Lyles, William D. . 
Lynch, Ignatius S. 
Mace, Samuel V. . 

— Magill, Thomas 
Magruder, D. L., . 
Marr, Thomas F. 
Massey, C. H. B. 
- Maund, Frederick, 
McKee, James S. 
McPherson, James, M. ] 

— MePherson, William S. 
McFadden, Thomas 
McQuinn, William H. 

— Melvin, McCarty B. 
-Merryman, Moses W. 

Miller, James W. 
Mills, Sylvanus 
...-Mitchell, George L. 
Moore, G. A. 
Morris, John 
Morgan, Gerard E. 
Morison, James, M. D, 
Mudd, George D. 
--Muudell, John H. . 
Murdoch, Thomas F. . 
Nalley, R. J. R. 
Nelras, Henry P. 
Nelson, Louis F. 

— Newmau, William G. H, 
Norris, Basil . 
Osburn, Abner 
Owens, A. G.W. . 
Page, John W. 
Palmer, James C, M. D., 
Partridge, Frank E. 
Patterson, Frank 
Pattison, Henry L. 
Pearce, Thomas T. G, 

— Peach, William E. 
Pindell, William Nick 
Plaster, G. E. 
Porter, Archibald 
Pratt, Stephen H. 
Prentiss, John H. , 
Price, Elias C. . 
Price, Thomas K., M. D., 



Preceptors. 


Residence 


Dr. Bussey, 


Pennsylvania. 


«' Spencer, J. T. 


Virginia. 


« Shipley, 


Maryland. 


" Leilh, . 


Virginia. 


Professor Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


« Smith, . 


« 


Dr. J. Aitken, . 


i( 


<' Cooke, . 


u 


" Magruder, . 


ti 




North Carolina. 


Dr. Tayman, 


Maryland. 


Professor Dunbar, 


11 


" Baxley, 




Infirmary, . 


(i 


Dr. Hyde, . 


Ohio. 


Professor Baxley, 


Maryland. 




Virginia. 


" Chew, . 


Maryland. 


Dr. Annan, 


(< 


Baltimore Alms House, 


<( 


Professor Smith, . 




Dr. Riggs, 


If 


Baltimore Infirmary, . 


Maryland. 


Dr. H. P. Mudd, 


Missouri, 


« H. Brooke, 


Maryland. 


" Buckler, . ; 


<< 


Professor Dunbar, 


(.' 


Dr. L. B. Stark, 


Virginia. 


« L. Tyler, 


Maryland. 


Professor Smith, 


ii 


(i Dunbar, 


ti 


Dr. J. D. Heaton, 


Virginia. 


" Welch, . 


Maryland. 


Professor Dunbar, 


North Carohna. 




United States Navy 


" Smith, 


Maryland. 


Baltimore Infirmary, . 


North Carolina. 


Dr. Jones, . 


Pennsylvania. 


<' Orrick, . 


Maryland. 


" J. D. Duval, 


li 


« J. L. Gibbons, 


''i 


" T. Leith, . 


Virginia. 


" Ingalls, . 


<( 


<' E. C. Baldwin, . 


Maryland. 


Professor Smith, . 


(( 


Dr. M.C. Price, 


u 




Virginia. 



16 



students. 

Read, James B. . 
Read, John L. 
Readel, John D. 
Rich, Arthur J. 
Richard, Victor P. 
Richardson, S. S. . 
Ridgely, Aquila T. 
Rivers, Philip . 
Robinson, Philemon B. 
Rogers, William H. 
Russell, Charles . 
Sappington, Richard 
Sappingtbn, Sydney A 
Sicker, E. A. 
Shipley, N. 0. . 
Slingluff,R. H. 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, B. B. . 
Smith, Nathan 
Somers, William H. 
Spence, Ara 
Spencer, Francis 
Spindle, Philip S. 
Steele, Thomas R. 
Steuart, James A. 
Stewart, David, M. D., 
Stevenson, Charles P. 
Stump, William H. 
Thomas, Daniel W. 
Thomas, G. S. C. . 
Thomas, J. D. . 
Thornton, John F. . 
Turner, Philip A. 
Turner, J. H., M. D., 
Van Lear. B.B. . 
Van Wyck, John C. 
Waters, Edmund G. 
Waugh, John W. . 
Webster, George W. 
Welsh, R. S. . 
Wertenbaker, W. £. 
White, Gabriel P. . 
White, William . 
Wickes, Joseph A. 
Williams, Thomas H. . 
Winter, Luther E. 
Worthington, James C. 
Wright, Francis R. 
Wysham, W. E. . 
Young, Thomas W. 



Total 



Preceptors. 


Residence. 


Professor Smith, . 


Georgia. 


Dr. A. W. Read, ■ . 


Virginia. 


Dr. Readel, . 


Maryland. 


Professor Chew, 


« 


Dr. Murphy, 


France. 


« G. W. Lawrence, 


Maryland. 


Professor Chew, 


11 


Dr. Giger, . 


tt 


«' H.D.Faulkner, . 


Virginia. 


Professor Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Dr. A. C. Robinson, 


Maine. 


« Piggott, 


Maryland. 


" T. Sappington, 


n 


Professor Smith, 


(( 


Dr. Giger, . 


(( 




Virginia. 


Professor Smith, 


Maryland. 


(< « 


Massachusetts. 




Maryland. 


•' Chew, . 


a 


" Dunbar, . 


ft 


Dr. Wm. L. Gatewood, 


Virginia. 


« Theobald, 


(( 


Professor Smith, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Stevenson, 


t( 


" Ramsay, 


n 


" W. M. Hammond, 


u 


'< J. C. Thomas, 


ti 


«< J. Lambert, 


l( 


" Gordon, . 


Virginia. 


" Turner, 


Maryland. 



" O.J.Smith, 
Baltimore Alms House, 

Professor Dunbar, 
Dr. Webster, . 

« Cornthwaite, . 
Professor Dunbar, 
Dr. R. B. Baker, 

'' Liggett, . 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
' (I (( 

Professor Dunbar, 
" Smith, . 
Dr.T. H.Wright, . 

" Welsh, . 

" Heywood, . 
196 



tt 

tt 

tt 
North Carolina. 
Maryland. 

<i 

tt 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 



North Carolina. 




? ^ 



MARYLAND MEDICAL INSTITUTE, 



§1 



This Institute is organized with a view of elevating the standard of 
ofEce instruction, in accordance with the design of the National Medical 
Convention. 

The members of this association have procured, in a central part of the 
City of Baltimore, a suite of rooms for the accommodation of private 
students, to whom they offer every facility for a thorough prosecution of 
the study of the medical scienc-^s. 

A select library containing the standard medical works; a cabinet with 
every important article treated of in the materia medica; anatomical, 
physiological and pathological plates and preparations, will be placed before 
the student as he progresses in his studies; and opportunities will also be 
afforded him of becoming familiar with the use of the microscope, with 
auscultation and medical chem'stry. 

Daily systematic readings and examinations will be held in all the 
branches of medical education — b^ the preceptors in person, during the 
Spring, Summer and Autumn, and regular examinations upon the sub- 
jects taught in the medical schools during the Winter. 

Clinical instruction will be occasionally given during the year, and 
lectures on subjects not embraced in the University course, illusiraied by 
drawings, plates and preparations, will be delivered during the Summer 
months. 

It is also in contemplation, to afford an opportunity for private dissec- 
tion. 

Fees. — For the terra of one year S'lOO 00; for examinations and all 
other office privileges during the session of the Universities ^30 00; in 
either case in advance. 

Any additional information may be obtained, on application to Dr. E. 
W. Theobald, No. 74 North Charles street. 

E. W. THEOBALD, M. D. 

No. 74 North Charles street. 

DAVID STEWART, M. D. 

No. 77 North Eutaw street. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D. 

No. 129 Saratoga street. 

CHARLES FRICK, M. D. 

^ No. 46 St. Paul street. A 

6 






F 11 T Y - S E C N D 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR AND CATALOGUE 




OF THE 



I MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF TiiE 



^uitJerBiti) <5f Ittarglan^, 









r-y=. 


^#^ 


^ 


k. 






^wwHii 






m 




ll^^^rf 


"^^ 




SESSION 1849-'50 



BALTIMORE: 

JOHN \V . WOODS, PRINTER. 
1849. 






FORTY. SECOND 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



ATTENDING LECTURES IN THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



^mx^it$xtfj of ^^ixt^tmh: 



SESSION 1849 -'50. 



B A L T I INI R E : 

JOHN W . WOODS, PRINTER 



1849. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ASHTON ALEXANDER, M. D., Provost. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SiVIITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKEN, M. D. LL. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THERAPEUTICS, MATERIA MEDICA AND HYGIENE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. 

WILLIAxM POWER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MIDWIFERY AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND 

CHILDREN. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

LECTURER ON PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY AND DEMONSTRATOR OF 

ANATOMY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN. 

DEAN. 



PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



CATALOGUE OP STUDENTS, 





1848-'9 




Students. 


Preceptors. 


Residence. 


Ahe\\ William M. 




Maryland. 


Allen, R. W. 


Prof. Smith, 


(( 


Andre, James R. 


Dr. J. R. Sudler, 


Delaware. 


Anthony, John, Jr. 


Prof. Smith, 


North Carolina, 


Armstrong, James H. 


Dr. Armstrong, 


Pennsylvania. 


^ Baldwin, Julius A. 


Dr. E. C. Baldwin, 


Maryland. 


Baldwin, Mahlon R. 


Dr. T. Leith, 


Virginia. 


Bardwell, James R. 


Dr. H. E. Beltz, 


Maryland. 


Beall, William, M. D. 




Virginia. 


Beall, W. Francis, 


Dr. William Beall, 


a 


Belt, Upton H. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


VBelt, W. Seton, 


Prof. Chew, 


<> 


Berry, William H. 


Bait. Alms House, 


D. C. 


N Billingsley, John A. T. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


> Bird, William P. 


Prof. Chew, 


<( 


^ Blakiston, R. Pinkney, 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


C( 


Blanton, 0. M. 


Md. Medical Institute 


Mississippi. 


^'Boaman, Charles, 


Prof Chew, 


Virginia. 


Boon, William Henry, 


Dr. R. Brookings, 


Pennsylvania. 


Boulden, James E. Porter, 


Dr. S. Harper, 


Delaware. 


•^ Brace, R. 


Dr. Pool, 


Maryland. 


Brashear, Basil Brown, 


Dr. F. D. McMeal, 


Ohio. 


Brewer, Marbury, 


Dr. Claude, 


Maryland. 


Brien, J. McPherson, 


Prof Smith, 


(( 


Bromwell, Robert E. 


Dr. H. B. Broughton, 


C( 


Brown, Samuel P. 


Dr. John F. Miller, 


Virginia. 


^ Brown, Septimus, 


Prof Smith, 


Maryland. 


Browne, William H. 


Md. Medical Institute, *' 


Bruce, John J. 


Drs. Smith & Healey 


(( 



students. 

Bryan, T. G. 

Burneston, Edwards Reed, 

Burns, Arthur, 

Butler, George W. 
^ Carter, George W. 
- Carter, Walter K. 

Chabot, Laurence J. 
^ Chamberlaine, J. E. M. 

Chandler, Samuel S. 

Chew, Philemon, Jr. 

Clarke, Isaac E. 

Clarvoe, Julius A. C. 

Clendinen, William H. 

Cochran, William W. 
^ Cowman, R. H. 

Crain, Robert, 

Crapster, Milton H. 
^ Cronmiller, Thos. Le Page, 

Cunningham, Charles T. D. 

Curley, Joseph H. 

Dashiell, George William, 
•^Davidson, C. H. W. 

De Butts, John, M. D. 

Dickinson, Henry J. Porter, 

Digges, Robert, 

Dorsey, Edward J. 

Dorsey, R. I. 
^ Dorsey, W. P. 

Douglass, William A. 

Doyle, John A. 
^ Du Hamel, William J. C. 
• Dusenbery, E. La Fayette, 

Dyson, Robert, 

Ebert, Edwin, 

Eccleston, John C. 
V Emory, D. C. H. 

Fendall, Joshua T. C. 
VPergusson, Oscar A. 



Preceptors. 


Residence. 


Dr. Hooper, 


North Carolina. 


Dr. S. R. Clarke, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


(( 


Dr. Stevens, 


Virginia. 


Dr. H. Dorsey, 


u 


Dr. S. Harper, 


\ Maryland. 


Prof. Chew, 


Dr. W. Clendinen, 


(I 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


(C 


Dr. Dawson, 


Pennsylvania. 


Dr. H. Brooke, 


Maryland. 




Massachusetts. 


Dr. G. S. D. Shipley, 


Maryland. 


Dr. A. Clendinen, 


(C 


Dr. Sparks, 


(( 


Prof. Smith, 


n 


Drs. J. & S. Swope, 


a 


Dr. J. Cronmiller, 


" 


Prof. Smith, 


«< 


Dr. Dalrymple, 


U 


Prof. Dunbar, 


<( 


Dr. J. Davidson, 


(( 


Dr. J. L. Adreon, 


(( 


Dr. Digges, 


u 


Md. Medical Institute 




Dr. Gough, 


tt 


Prof. Dunbar, 


It 


Dr. F. Alexander, 


Virginia. 


Dr. J. Boone, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Chew, 


(( 


Dr. J. L. Dusenbery, 


North Carolina. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Dr. W. Mcllvain, 


Pennsylvania. 


Md. Medical Institute, 


, Maryland. 


Md. Medical Institute 


> 


Prof. James H. Miller, 


(( 


Prof. Smith, 


IC 



students. 

Fernandez, Jose Ynes, 

Fitzhugh, William H. 

Fleming, John P. 

Foote, Jerome S. 

Fulton, Robert H. 
•^Glisan, Rodney, 
^' Gough, Richard T, 
'^Grafton, William H. 

Graham, Richard E. 

Hammond, Milton, 
^ Hammond, Thomas W. 
'^Hance, Thomas C. 
^' Hardy, Thomas E. 
VHarrell, William B. 

Hays, George Thomas, 

Heagy, George W. 
^ Hendrix, Joseph W. 

Henkle, Eli Jones, 

Hibberd, William, 

Hoblitzell, H. S. 
■^ Hurst, George N. 

Jeffries, William G. 
^ Jenkins, Felix, 
^ Jewett, J. Gushing, 
^' Johns, Edward W. 

Johnston, Christopher, M. 
^ Johnson, Richard P. 
v' Johnson, William H. 
V Jones, Reuben E. 

Keffer, William H. 

Keyser, Charles C. 

King, James F. 

Knight, Granville S. 

Krozer, John J. R., M. D. 
V Lake, Robert Pinkney, 
-^ Larkin, William D. F. 
^ Leach, Richard V. 

Leas, C. A., M. D. 
^ Lester, Shipley, Jr. 



Preceptors. Residence. 

Dr. E. J. Chaisty, Venezuela. 

Dr. F. Dorsey, Maryland. 

Dr. Perkins, " 

Dr. Davis, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. R. Fulton, Maryland. 

Dr. G. W. Lawrence, " 
Prof. Smith, 

Bait. Alms House, " 

Prof. Dunbar, " 

Dr. J. H. Cunningham, Pennsylvania. 
Md. Medical Institute, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, 

Dr. D. A. O'Donnel, " 

Dr. Jas. A. Harrell, North Carolina. 

Dr. J. G. Hays, Virginia. 

Drs. J. & S. Swope, Maryland. 

Dr. Gerry, Pennsylvania. 

Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. Evans, Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Md. Medical Institute, Kentucky. 

Dr. Wm. L. Gatewood, Virginia. 

Prof Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. F. Giger, " 

Drs. Smith & Healey, " 



D. 



Prof Dunbar, 

Md. Medical Institute, " 

Dr. J. C. Orrick, 

Dr. W. W. Magruder, Virginia. 

Dr. G. W. Lawrence, Maryland. 



Dr. Murray, 
Dr. Knight, 

Prof Dunbar, 

Prof Chew, 

Dr. J. T. Spencer, 



North Carolina. 
Maryland. 



Virginia. 
Maryland. 



students. 


Preceptors. 


Residence. 


/Love, Eli N. 


Md. Medical Institute, 


Virginia. 


^' Lumsden, Rev. Wm. 




Maryland. 


»/Mace, Samuel V. 


Dr. James Aitken, 


<< 


^ Magruder, D. L. 


Dr. R. P. Magruder, 


<( 


Mass, Frank, 


Prof. Dunbar, 


it 


^ Massey, Charles H. B. 


Prof. Chew, 


(( 


May, Bushrod L. 


Dr. W. A. Gillespie, 


Virginia. 


McKew, Dennis F. 


Md. Medical Institute, 


Maryland. 


, McMaster, John T. B. 


Dr. G. S. D. Shipley, 


(( 


McQuinn, William, 


Prof. Baxley, 


Virginia. 


^ Melvin, McCarty B. 


Md. Medical Institute, 


Maryland. 


Merryman, M. W. 


Prof. Chew, 


(( 


Millar, John William, 




({ 


V Miller, James W. 


Dr. Annan, "> 


,, 




Dr. Eichelberger, > 


■^^ Mills, Sylvanus B. 


Bait. Alms House, 


(( 


V Mundell, John H. 


Prof. Chew, 




Murdoch, Thomas F. 


Bait. Alms House, 




Nalley, Robert J. R. 


Prof. Dunbar, 




V Nelson, Louis F. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 




V Newman, William G. H. 


Prof. Smith, 




Noble, William D. 


Dr. W. L. Wingate, 




^Norris, Basil, 


Prof. Dunbar, 





Palmer, Robert H. 

Parke, Joseph M. 
- Peach, William E. 

Pearce, Thomas F. G. 

Pearce, Wm. A., M. D. 

Petit, A. T. 
"^ Pratt, Stephen Hartshorn, 
•^ Price, Edward B. 

Priestly, Edward, 

Purnell, James B. R, 

Pye, Charles H. 

Rankin, Robert G. 

Raymond, Lucius, 

Read, James B. 

Read, J. L. 

Readel, J. D. 



V 



Dr. W. S. Thompson, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. J. C. Orrick, 



Dr. A. C. Robinson, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. F. R. McManus, 
Dr, J. A. Reed, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Dunbar, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. A. W. Read, ' 
Prof. Smith, 



Illinois. 
Maryland. 



North Cnrolina. 
Georgia. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 



^/ 






students. 


Preceptors, 


Residence. 


Richard, Victor P. 


Dr. John Murphy, 


Maryland. 


Rider, Charles E. 


Prof. Smith, 


(I 


Rider, Noah S. 


Prof. Smith, 


tt 


Robb, Stephen, 


Dr. Morris, 


North Carolina. 


Robbins, D. H. 


Md. Medical Institute 


, Maryland. 


Rogers, Stephen,- 


Dr. J B. Pierce, 


New York. 


Rogers, William H. 


Bait. Alms House, 


Maryland. 


Sappington, Richard, 


Dr. A. S. Piggott, 


(C 


Sasscer, Frederick, 


Dr. J. H. Skinner, 


(( 


Scott, William W. 


Dr. R. B. Baker, 


North Carolina. 


Shepard, Robinson W. 


Dr. Carroll, 


Virginia. 


•^ Smith, B. B. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Smith, Nathan, 


Prof. Chew, 


Massachusetts. 


V Spencer, Francis, 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Spindle, Philip S. 


Md. Medical Institute 


, Virginia. 


^ Steele, Thomas R. 


Md. Medical Institute 




Stewart, James A. 


Bait. Alms House, 


Maryland. 


Taylor, George W. 


Dr. J. L. Taylor, 


Missouri. 


«/ Thomas, Daniel W. 


Dr. W. M. Hammond. 


, Maryland. 


^'Thomas, Edwin S. 


Bait. Alms House, 


(( 


v^ Thomas, G. S. C. 


Dr. J. C. Thomas, 


(( 


Todd, Henry, L. 


Prof. Smith, 


(( 


Trenchard, Curtis J. 


Prof. Chew, 


<c 


Truett, George W. 


Prof. Smith, 


Pennsylvania. 


Turner, P. A. 


Dr. John Turner, 


Maryland. 


Van Lear, B. B. 




(.' 


Van Wyck, John C, M. 


D. 


tt 


Waller, John A. J. 


Dr. S. J. S. Ker, 


ti 


Walton, H. Rowland, 


Dr. J. Ridout, 


It 


Waugh, John W., M. D. 




tt 


^' Webster, George W. 


Dr. Webster, 


tt 


Webster, Henry W. 


Dr. Webster, 


(( 


Weis, Ezra, 


Dr. Charles Macgill, 


i< 


-'' White, Gabriel P. 


Prof. Smith, 


North Carolina, 


•^ White, William, 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Wilkins, John, 


Prof. Smith, 


(( 


Williams, P. C. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Virginia. 


Williamson, Henry P. 


Dr. Baker, 


North Carolina. 


Williard, Abraham P. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 



8 



Students. 
Wilmer, William Ringgold, 
Wilson, Henry M. 
Winter, Jacob D. 
Wood, Edgar W. 
Wysham, William E. 
Young, Robert H. . 
Total, 



Preceptors. Residence, 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Baxley, 

Practitioner, Kentucky. 

Dr. Bayne, Maryland. 

Md. Medical Institute, 
Dr. Miller, Pennsylvania. 

190. 



n/ 






I 



C) 



GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held i?i March, 1848, the follow- 
ing candidates received the Degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



JVames. 


Subject of Thesis. 




Residence 


Austin, Henry, 


Scarlatina, 




England 


Barrett, William E. 


Croup, 




Pa. 


Berry, Benjamin, 


Sulphate of Quinine, 




Md. 


Bond, Benson, 


Epilepsy, 




(< 


Boone, Charles E. 


Modus Operandi of Medicines, 


K 


Cabaniss, Thomas T. 


Phthisis Pulmonalis, 




Va. 


Carpenter, James A. S. 


Puerperal Fever, 




Pa. 


Carrico, Thomas A. 


Acute Rheumatism, 




Md. 


Clagett, Grafton A. 


Pneumonia, 




(( 


Cochran, William W. 


Rheumatism, 




i( 


Cohen, Henry M. 


Syphilis, 




Va. 


Crane, William B. 


Functions of Sympathetic Nerve, 


Md. 


Culler, James J. 


Hydrophobia, 




" 


Daugherty, Thomas, 


Rheumatism, 




(C 


De Butts, John, 


Pneumonia, 




. it 


Eareckson, Roderick W 


. Force of Habit, 




If 


Ebaugh, Andrew J. 


Scrofula, 




(( 


Edelin, Edward V. 


Menstruation, 




(( 


Free, John L. 


Principles and Practice 


of Med- 






icine, 




Pa. 


Gibson, John C. 


Puerperal Fever, 




Md. 


Gunter, Enos F. 


Acute Pneumonia, 




Va. 


Haig, William, 


Necrosis, 




Md. 


Hay, John, 


Scarlatina, 




Pa. 


Howard, Cornelius, 


Diagnosis of Hypertrophy 


ofthe 






Heart, 




Md. 


Hurtt, Edward, 


Venesection, 




ti 


Jackson, Samuel R. 


Delirium Tremens, 




Va. 


Johnson, James T. 


Rheumatic Endocarditis and Pe- 






ricarditis, 




Md. 


Keenan, Joseph A. 
2 


Puerperal Fever, 




(( 



10 



J^ames. 

Krozer, John J. R. 
Lyles, William D. 
Maund, Frederick, 
Mackie, James S. 
McPherson, William S. 
Mitchell, George L. 
Moore, George A. 
Mudd, George D. 
Osburn, Abner, 
Page, John W. 
Partridge, Frank E. 
Patterson, Frank, 
Pindell, William N. 
Plaster, George E. 
Prentiss, John H. 
Price, Elias C. 
Rich, Arthur J. 
Richardson, Samuel S. 
Ridgely, Aquilla T. 
Rivers, Philip, 
Russell, Charles, 
SappingtoU; Sidney A. 
Shipley, Nimrod 0. 
SliiJgluff, Reuben H. 
Spence, Ara, 
Stevenson, Charles P. 
Stump, William H. 
Thomas, James D. 
Van W>ck, John C. 
Waugh, John W. 
Welsh, Robert S. 
Wickes, Joseph A. 
Williams, Thomas H. 
Worthington, James C. 

The Degree of Bachelor 
Rev. William 0. Lumsden of Maryland. 

Total, 



Subject of Thesis. 


Residence. 


Apoplexy, . 


Va. 


Symptoms and Diagnosis, 


Md. 


Ergot, 


11 


Causes of Disease, 


It 


Mercury, 


(< 


Bilious Remittent Fever, 


<( 


Pneumonia, 


(C 


Malaria, 


Mo, 


Typhoid Fever, 


Va. 


Scrofula, 


N. C. 


Cataract, 


Md. 


Remittent Fever, 


N. C. 


Lithotomy and Lithotrity, 


Md. 


Tetanus, 


Va. 


Fracture of Cervix Femoris, 


Md. 


Phthisis Pulmonalis, 


•• 


Asthma, 


If 


Dysentery, 


(( 


Pleuritis, 


i( 


Typhus Fever, 


(( 


Typhoid Fever, 


Me. 


Indigestion, 


Md. 


Peculiarities of Women, 


(( 


Mercury, 


t( 


Acute Gastritis, 


ft 


Enteric Fever, 


t€ 


Intermittent Fever, 


ft 


Intermittent Fever, 


tf 


Typhus, and Typhoid Fever, 


t* 


Respiration, 


it 


Specific Eflects of Ergot, 


*r 


Medical Investigation, 


if 


Enteric Fever, 


ft 


Acute Rheumatism, 


ft 


Dr of Medicine was conferred 


upon the 



63. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 



The next session will commence on the last Monday (29th) of 
October, 1849, and close on the 15th of March, 1850. 

The Faculty will endeavor to give a practical and intelligible 
course of instruction, calculated to prepare the student for the 
emergencies of his future profession. For purposes of clinical 
teaching, they have at their command and under their sole con- 
trol, the Baltimore Infirmary, which, having been enlarged re- 
cently, now contains one hundred and fifty beds. Its internal 
economy is managed by members of the Sisterhood of Charity, 
whose care, kindness, devotion to duty, and considerate attention 
to the necessities of the sick are known the world over. Eight 
clinical assistants are annually appointed from the medical class, 
who reside in the Institution, and have an opportunity to observe 
the cases of disease which enter the wards. 

The advantages for studying Practical Anatomy are unsur- 
passed, affording the student the fullest and most favorable means 
for acquiring a knowledge of those elementary details of struc- 
ture, without w^hich, as a practitioner, he is likely to be involved 
in errors whose penalty is often a sacrifice of his professional 
prospects, position and reputation. So essential, indeed, do the 
Faculty regard personal attention to this branch of medical edu- 
cation, that they require evidence of at least one session's attend- 
ance in the dissecting room from all candidates for graduation. 

The Department of Surgery comprises daily lectures on the 
Principles and Practice of Surgery and Clinical instruction. The 
wards of the Infirmary constantly furnish cases requiring the ap- 
plication of general remedial treatment or surgical operations. 
During the last year many minor and several capital operations, 
including amputations, lithotomy, lithotripsy and others, have 



12 

been performed. In the lecture room Surgery is taught as a 
reality, not as an abstraction. With this object in view, those 
portions of the subject which most concern the practitioner are 
attended to; and the student is directed when and how to act 
in the most frequent, and therefore most important, exigencies of 
his daily professional life. A badly managed fracture, or an un- 
recognized and unreduced dislocation, is a standing memorial of 
ignorance and incompetence, from which the conscience of the 
upright physician can scarcely escape, and from the consequences 
of which he is not unfrequently ruined in reputation and beggared 
in purse. To this division of the subject much attention is given, 
so that the nature of the accident, and the best means for treating 
it may be clearly comprehended. 

Having been actively engaged in the practice of Surgery for 
nearly thirty years, the Professor has had large experience in the 
treatment of surgical diseases, and has had occasion to perform, 
repeatedly, all the important operations. His instruction is, there- 
fore, of necessity, in a great degree, personal — the result of what 
he has seen and done, and not merely of what he has read — a 
statement of facts, and not a compilation of opinions. Having 
accumulated a large collection of preparations, casts, drawings, 
surgical instruments and apparatus, he is prepared to illustrate 
his course in the fullest manner, and to exhibit to his class the 
application of all modern improvements in surgical art. 

The Department of Chemistry is devoted primarily to teaching 
the elementary principles of chemical science, without a thorough 
comprehension of which no one can hope to advance into its more 
intricate portions wath any assurance of satisfaction or success. 
The rules of chemical nomenclature, the phenomena and laws of 
caloric, light, electricity and galvanism, the properties of simples 
and compounds, are displayed in their most intelligible aspects, 
with the avowed aim of thus placing at the student's disposal the 
formulse by which, according to his industry and inclination, he 
may solve the more difficult problems with which both physical 
and organic chemistry abound. That all physicians will become 
expert chemists is scarcely to be expected ; all, however, may 
acquire, if the disposition exist, reasonable familiarity with those 



13 

beautiful, harmonious, simple and uniform laws, which lie at its 
foundation and pervade all its actions : understanding which, the 
student may extend his knowledge almost infinitely — and ignorant 
of which, he cannot safely or intelligently advance a single step. 
The Laboratory of the University contains abundant materiel for 
preparing and illustrating a chemical course; and the modifica- 
tions and improvements of modern art are constantly added. 

The Department of Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Hygiene 
includes a description of the natural history, preparation and 
mode of exhibition of medicinal agents, and the laws and condi- 
tions under which health may be preserved and disease avoided. 
The mere enumeration of a number, large or small, of well-known 
or obscure drugs, with the safe or unsafe doses in which they may 
be given, is not looked upon as the end of Materia Medica ; but 
a full history of their mode of production, properties and physio- 
logical action, with the indications governing their employment. 
It is an axiom in medicine, that "no remedy becomes such save 
by its timely use ;" to determine which, involves something be- 
yond a routine knowledge of the sensible qualities of a drug, or 
the amount in which it may be borne. The principles, therefore, 
which should govern the administration of remedies, are carefully 
unfolded, as the only sure guides to attaining their desired effects. 
A cabinet of Materia Medica, containing specimens of all the 
common and rare articles, and a set of illustrations from standard 
works on Medical Botany, are used in the course. 

The Department of Anatomy embraces the various sub-divisions 
of this science, viz. Physiological, Descriptive and Surgical 
Anatomy. It is intended so to teach Anatomy that its primitive 
truths may be perfectly acquired, and through them a knowledge 
of its more difficult parts be enlarged and confirmed. As well 
might the artisan learn to make a watch or a steam engine by 
listening to a course of abstract or demonstrative lectures, as the 
student become, in this way alone, an accomplished anatomist or 
surgeon. Public teaching and private study should be conjoined. 
While, then, earnest effort will be made to exhibit truthfully the 
structure, form, position, relation and uses of the different organs, 
it is insisted that all profitable knowledge of them must be 



14 

gathered, under proper guidance, by one's-self; and that, however 
much may be taught and shown in the public hall, personal prac- 
tical examination is absolutely and indispensably essential. The 
theoretical anatomist can never become the dextrous and skilful 
surgeon ; nor can the most tenacious memory, crowded though 
it be with the barbarous nomenclature of anatomical science, 
stand one in much stead in those pressing exigencies of practice 
which call for prompt, prudent, efficient action ; where something 
is to be done speedily and safely, and not merely a name to be 
remembered The instruction in Anatomy is, therefore, made as 
demonstrative as possible — especially of those parts which are 
most important. The course of an artery, the form of an articula- 
tion, the relations of a viscus^ will be of enduring and increasing 
value, when all the doctrines of homologues and heterologues, and 
the theories of morphological and histological development shall 
have faded forever. Careful dissection of the parts themselves, 
large diagrams and colored drawings, after the most approved 
authorities, of which the Professor has a complete and unexcelled 
series, models and preparations, constitute the means of instruc- 
tion. 

The Department of Theory and Practice is occupied with daily 
lectures, and clinical visits and lectures at the Infirmary. The 
lectures are an exposition of the natural history of disease and its 
management ; including diagnosis, cause, anatomical characters 
and treatment. The "Theory" of Medicine is not understood to 
involve an historical or critical examination of all the doctrines 
or dogmas of past or present time, but a simple statement of 
such principles as observation and experience — truthful observa- 
tions, real and reliable experience — have established. As the 
great source of medical truth is Nature, not Opinion, it is deemed 
useless to bestow much attention upon the unsubstantial and fan- 
ciful, though ingenious speculations which have risen and fallen 
in the progress of medicine, even if they happen to be fortified by 
the authority of a name or a party. The chief object will be to 
teach what is known, not to speculate about the unknown ; to 
place before the student intelligible precepts for identifying dis- 
ease, its differences and resemblances ; to enable him to recognize 



15 

its beginning, understand its progress, anticipate its event, and 
the influences which tend to produce or arrest it ; appealing, 
for confirmation and illustration of the truth of what is taught, to 
the cases which are daily witnessed in the hospital wards. 
Modern medicine differs from that which has preceded it mainly 
in this : that while it esteems at their full value the powers of art, 
it also regards, and wisely regards, the powers of Nature, teach- 
ing the true wasdom of watching patiently, observing carefully, 
acting cautiously ; so that the operations of Nature being clearly 
understood, the ministrations of Art may be judiciously, efficiently 
and beneficially applied. 

To the Department of Obstetrics also belongs the considera- 
tion of Diseases of Women and Children. Obstetrics having 
made marked progress of late years, has at length assumed its 
proper rank as an important division of scientific Medicine. 
Referring chiefly to a process which, in the majority of instances, 
is naturally and healthfully conducted to a favorable termination, 
it also includes those more complicated conditions which demand 
so much self-reliance and skill in the professional attendant. The 
surgeon often saves life by his coolness, dexterity and capacity ; 
the obstetrician is called upon to perform the same office, not for 
one life but for two, and at a time when life is most desired and 
death most dreaded. That the many escape is no excuse for 
the ignorance through which the few perish. To enforce and 
illustrate the conditions under which danger may impend, by 
reference to the natural process, the deviations from it, the ac- 
cidents which occur, and the manner of meeting and remedying 
them, is the purpose of scientific obstetrics. In a branch so 
eminently practical, the lessons inculcated should be simple, in- 
telligible, readily recalled, and prudently applied. When to act — 
when to forbear ; how far to trust Nature, and when to aid her 
by the resources of Art ; when to sacrifice the less to the more 
valuable life ; in short, all the complications and contingencies 
which experience has demonstrated as most likely to occur, be- 
come, in turn, the subject of consideration and discussion. The 
form and application of instruments, the mode of effecting artifi- 
cial delivery, and other points, are fully described. All the 



necessary means, including casts, models, machines, instruments 
and drawings, are at hand, and the collection is constantly in- 
creasing. 

A Lectureship of Pathological Anatomy was instituted pre- 
vious to the last session, and the first course of lectures on the 
subject has been given. It is the object of the lecturer to make 
the student conversant with the changes developed by disease ; 
to unfold the history and laws of the great pathological processes 
which are set up in the body, and to impart such information as 
may enable one to distinguish real morbid change from that which 
similates it. It is notorious that no well defined or reliable no- 
tions of morbid anatomy can be acquired from mere description, 
without the means of palpable and visible demonstration. To be 
able to identify an hypertrophied heart, or a cancerous liver, or an 
inflamed lung, one must see the real thing, or a faithful delinea- 
tion of it. In the lectures upon this subject, regard is had to 
this necessity ; and the parts themselves, or accurate representa- 
tions of them, are constantly referred to. In this way the ele- 
mentary forms of disease and their mode of development, intimate 
structure and special characteristics, the difference between mor- 
bid and cadaveric change, are brought before the student, so that 
in practice he may be able to apply the test for himself, and de- 
termine the result. 

For the use of this chair the Faculty have purchased a most 
valuable, beautiful and extensive series of colored drawings, 
executed by an accomplished artist, under the personal direction 
of a gentleman formerly connected with the "Franklin" School of 
Philadelphia; in addition to which, Cruveilhier's unequalled 
work on Pathological Anatomy is used, with recent specimens 
and preparations from the hospital and museum. 

The Demonstrator has charge of the Department of Practical 
Anatomy. The rooms are open early in October, and dissections 
can be conducted at all hours of the day, and in the evening until 
10, P. M. They are lighted by gas, and well warmed. Ana- 
tomical material is supplied at a very cheap rate, and is usually 
abundant. It is doubted, indeed, whether the facilities, in this 
respect, are exceeded by those of any school in the country, ex- 
cept one or two at the extreme south. 






17 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland ranks 
f»«Ftk-ift- paint of age among the schools of the Union. Her 
alumni, scattered over the whole south and south-west, still 
cherish, it is trusted, some remembrance of the Alma Mater in 
whose halls they weif trained, and will greet. grat^lly this an- 
nouncement of her continueci prosperity. To them the present 
Faculty^ would commend her, with .confident assurance, that her 
means for bestowing a complete medical education,_and the de- 
swe^n their part to enlarge and extend those means, have in no 
wise lessened or abated ; and that, so far as in them lies, they 
will always endeavor to maintain her ancient reputation, by de- 
votion to the duties of their position, and by a hearty Co-operation 
in all the movements w^hich have in view the elevation and im- 
provement of the medical profession. 

'^The Faculty have noticed, with much satisfaction, the general 
good conduct, industry and intelligence of the class in attendance 
during the session just closed. They have been particularly 
gratified at the large number present at the weekly examinations, 
and the creditable manner in which they have acquitted them- 
selves. While the reluctance which the shy and sensitive feel 
to submitting themselves to a public oral questioning is perfectly 
understood, it is hoped that the advantages of the system, in 
preparing the pupil for his final trial, and in enabling him to test 
his knowledge of the subject taught, may be more and more 
valued, and that even the most diffident and distrustful will at 
length take their place among their fellows. 

Believing that thorough professional training should be extended 
over a somewhat protracted period, the Faculty are prepared to 
meet most cordially the recommendations of the National Medical 
Association upon this point. They, therefore, advise their pupils 
to devote at least three years to preparatory study, to attend three 
courses of lectures, and, when not engaged in attendance upon 
lectures, to occupy themselves with a course of systematic read- 
ing, under the direction of some judicious practitioner, or in one 
of the private medical schools. A hurried education, conducted 
with a view of obtaining a diploma in the shortest possible time, 
and at the smallest possible expense, is of necessity incomplete 
3 



18 

and insufficient. The title, without the requisite amount of 
knowledge which it implies, always aggravates the errors com- 
mitted, and increases, as it ought to increase, the responsibility 
of him who commits them. To those young gentlemen who 
prefer a city residence, Baltimore offers peculiar advantages for 
private instruction. Among them the ''Baltimore Medical Insti- 
tute" and the ''Maryland Medical Institute," conducted by 
members of the profession of reputation and experience, with 
many private offices, will be found to afford all that can be desired 
in this respect. Regular courses of lectures, recitations and ex- 
aminations are given, and the student carefully guided in the 
selection of proper books and subjects of study. 

Whatever be the means or abilities of the teacher, his useful- 
ness will mainly depend upon the manner in which his instruc- 
tions are received and applied; their best use can be developed 
only when reciprocal confidence exists between himself and those 
to whom he stands in this exacting and responsible relation; a 
confidence which, in the pupil, must be based upon a manifesta- 
tion of real interest in his intellectual improvement, and in the 
teacher upon a sincere conviction that his labors are justly and 
generously appreciated. 

For the Faculty, 

JOSEPH ROBY, 7 ^ 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, r^^"^"^^^^^- 

Baltimore, March loth, 1849. 



fete, Hcgulatious for CSrabuation, ^c. 



The next session will begin on the last Monday (29th) of October, 
1849, and end on the loth day of March, 1850. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are for Surgery, Chemistry, 
Materia Medica, Anatomy, Theory and Practice, Obstetrics, fifteen 
dollars each. 

The fee for the course on Pathological Anatomy is five dollars^ 
and the fee for the ticket of Practical Anatomy is ten dollars. 

Every student is required to matriculate and to pay the regular fee, 
which Is five dollars. No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

The matriculation and lecture tickets must be taken out at the com- 
mencement of the session. Notes of solvent banks of the states where 
students reside will be received in payment. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two full 
courses of lectures in this institution; or one in this, after one in 
some other respectable medical school. 

The ticket of the lecturer on Pathological Anatomy, and the ticket 
of Practical Anatomy are required to be taken but once. 

Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Faculty, at 
such time as may be specified, a thesis, of his own composition, on 
some subject connected with medical science, and satisfy the Faculty, 
by appearing before them in a private examination, of his fitness for 
receiving the deorree of Doctor in IMedicine. 

The several Professors are in the habit of holding weekly public 
examinations throughout the session, attendance upon which is re- 
commended, though notenforced. Thejudgment of the Faculty upon 
the fitness of a candidate, is based on their knowledge of his general 
intelligence and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the 
result of the final examination. Open irregularity of conduct, negli- 
gence, continued and prolonged absence from lectures are always 
reofarded as obstacles to success in obtaininsr a decree. 



20 

The Faculty wish it to be distinctly understood that, while any 
student who has complied with the technical requisitions, viz. matricu- 
lation, attendance on lectures, and the deposit of a thesis, may appear 
before them for examination, they reserve to themselves, and will 
exercise, the right, of making moral as well as intellectual qualifica- 
tion, an element of their decision. 

The result of an examination is determined by a majority of votes. 
Should the Faculty be equally divided, the candidate maybe re-exam- 
ined, if he should desire it: if he decline a second examination, he 
may withdraw his thesis, and resume the position of a candidate in 
whose case no decision has been had. 

The graduation fee, (including Diploma,) is twenty dollars. 

A public commencement is held soon after the close of the exami- 
nations, under authority of the Provost and Regents of the Univer- 
sity, at which the degrees are conferred. No candidate will be ex- 
cused from attendance but by special vote of the Faculty. 

Eight students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as clinical 
assistants. The fee is eighty dollars per year, payable in advance. 

^JI^=» The Janitor, who may be found at his house on the University 
grounds, will direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses. The expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any city 
in the country ; good board being obtainable at from $ 3 00 /o $ 4 00 
per week. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY 

JAMES MORISON, M. D., Resident Physician. 
Sisler MARY CHRYSOSTOM, Sister Superior. 



RICHARD PINKNEY BLAKISTONE, -| 

J. E. M. CHA.MBERLAINE, I />/••; 

RICHARD V. LEACH, I ^^'''''^ 

LOUIS F. NELSON. I -Assistants. 



JAMES B. READ, I 



!<^^ 



9 






MARYLAND MEDICAL INSTITUTE, 

No. 69 FATETTE-ST., a few doors West of Charles-st. 



This Institute is organized with a view of elevating the standard of 
office instruction, in accordance with the design of the National Medical 
Convention. 

The members of this Association have procured, in a central part of the 
City of Baltimore, a suite of rooms for the accommodation of private stu- 
dents, to whom they offer every facility for a thorough prosecution of the 
study of the medical sciences. 

A select library containing the standard medical works; a cabinet pro- 
vided with every important article of the materia medica ; anatomical, 
physiological and pathological plates and preparations will be placed be- 
fore the student as he progresses in his studies; and opportunities will also 
be afforded him of becoming familiar with the use of tlie microscope, with 
auscultation and medical chemistry. 

Daily systematic readings and examinations will be held upon all the 
branches of medical education, by the preceptors in person, during the 
Spring, Summer and Autumn ; and regular examinations on the lectures 
during the session of the medical colleges. 

The students of this Institute will have the privilege of attending the 
daily clinics at the Baltimore Infirmary; and private clinical instruction 
will occasionally be given. 

Lectures on subjects not embraced in a University Course, illustrated 
by plates, preparations and drawings, will be delivered during the Sum- 
mer months. 

The Summer course of this Institution will commence on Monday, 18lh 
April next, and continue until the 1st Noveiiiber, with the exception of 
one month's vacation, from 16th July to 13th August. 

Fees. — For the term of one year, including winter course, $100 00; 
for examinations, and all other office privileges during the Session of the 
Medical ©Wleges, alone, ^30 00; in either case in advance. 

E. W. THEOBALD, M. D., Chairman. 
No. 74 North Charles street. 

DAVID STEWART, M. D. 

No. 77 North Eutaw street- 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D. 

Eutaw, near Mulberry street. 

CHARLES FRICK, M. D. 

No. 70 North Charles street. 



\ 



.^ 



V 



•^ 




'/f^^^« rtt^^. 



uv^ ^^3^ 




F O R T Y - T H I R I) 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR AND CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



llniuetsitg of iitavglanb. 





SESSION 18 50-5 1. 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD Sc CO. 

MDCC CL. 




FORTY-THIRD 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



Bntt)et0ttj3 of ittarjjlau^, 

SESSZOKT 1850-51, 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



ATTENDING LECTURES SESSION 1849-50, 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO. 

M D C C C L . 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Hon. JOHxN P. KENNEDY, Provost. 

FACULTY or PHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D., LL., D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THERAPEUTICS, MATERIA MEDICA AND HYGIENE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

WILLIAM POWER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MIDWIFERY AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN 
AND CHILDREN. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

LECTURER ON PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY AND DEMONSTRATOR 

OF ANATOMY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

DEAN. 

PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



1849-5 0, 



STUDENTS. 

Abell, William Matthew 
Adreon, William T. 
Aldridge, J. W. 
Allen, R. W. 
Andre, James R. 
Anthony, Joseph J. 
Baldwin, M. K. 
Baldwin, J. A., M. D. 
Bain, Julius S. 
Bardwell, James R. 
Beall, W. Francis - 
Belt, James H. 
Belt, Upton H. 
Benson, George W. 
Berry, Lawrence 
Berry, William H. 
Billingsley,J. A. T.,M. D. 
Blanton, O. M. 

Boon, William H. 

Boulden, James E. P. 

Brewer, Marbury 

Brien, J. MacPherson 
Bromwell, R. E. 
Browne, William Hand 
Brown, Samuel P. 
Brown, S., M. D. 



PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE, 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. J. Adreon, " 

Md. Medical Institute, " 

Prof. Smith, " 

Prof. Chew, Delaware. 

Prof. Smith, North Carolina. 

Md. Medical Institute, Virginia. 



Dr. J. Bain, 
Dr. H. E. Beltz, 
Dr. W. Beall, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. Reynolds, 
Bait. Alms House. 



Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Mississippi. 

Maryland. 

u 

Virginia. 

Dt. Columbia. 



Md. Medical Institute, Mississippi. 
Dr. R. A. P^^tterson,") p I . 

Dr. R. Brookings, | ^ ^"""'^ *' ''"'^^• 
Prof. Chew, Delaware. 

Dr. Claude, 7 at i i 

Md. Med. Institute, P^^^'-y^^"^- 

Prof. Smith, " 

Dr. E. H. Broiighton, " 

Md. Medical Institute, '' 



Dr. J. F. Miller, 



Virginia. 
Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



Bruce, John J. 
Buinestoii, Edwards R. 
Burns, Arthur 
Carper, E. D. W. 
Chabot, L. J. 
Chaney, Joseph P. 
Chew, Philemon 
Clendinen, William H- 
Cochran, W. W., M. D. 
Collins, V. M, G. 
Crain, Robert 
Crane, William B., M. D. 
Crapster, Milton H. 
Crawford, B. Bell 
Cunningham, C. T. D. 
Curley, Joseph H. 
Daugherty, B'd A.,M. D. 
Davis, John P. 
Oay, John T. 
Dickinson, H. J. P. 
Digges, Robert 
Dorsey, Edward J. 
Dorsey, R, J. 
Doyle, John A. 
Drummond, AVilliam F. 
Dunn, T. H. 
Dyson, Robert 
Ebert, Edwin 
Eccleston, John C. 
Edelin, Alfred 
Egbert, Daniel, M. D. 
Fernandez, Jose T. 
Farnandis, George G. 
Fendall, J. F. C. 
Field, Philip S 
Fitzhugh, William H. 
Fleming, J. Perkins 



PRECEPTORS. 


RESIDEKCE. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Dr. S. R. Clarke, 




Prof. Dunbar, 




Dr. Clendinen, 




Dr. Stonebraker, 




Dr. Henry Brooks, 




Prof. Smith, 




Dr. J. G. Lightner, 


Pennsylvania. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 



Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. W. W. Watkins, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Dalrymple, 

Dr. Inloes, 

Dr. W^illiam B. Day, 

Dr. J. L. Adreon, 

Dr. W. J. Digges, 

Md. Medical Institute, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Dr. J. Boone, 

Dr. W. C. Durkin, 

Dr. J. W. Walker, 

Prof. Smith, 

Prof. Dunbar, 

Prof. Power, 

Dr. H. Edelin, 

U. S. Navy, 

Dr. E. J. Chaisty, 

Dr. George Gibson, 

Prof. J. H. Miller, 

Dr. J. D. Willoughby, 

Md. Medical Institute, 

Dr. J. F. Perkins, 



Pennsylvania. 
Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 



South America. 
Maryland. 



Pennsylvania. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDF.>JTS. 


PnECEPTOKS. 


RESIDENCE. 


Fontaine, James McL. K. Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Foote, Jerome S. 


Dr. Davis, 


Pennsylvania, 


Forney, Cornelius W. 




Maryland. 


France, G. W. 


Dr. J. W. Leach, 7 
Dr. Willoughby, j" 


u 


Fulton, H. K. 


Dr. Robert Fulton, 


u 


Garrott, John E. 


Prof. Chew, 


(( 


Goldsborough, H. 


Dr. C. C. Cox, 


u 


Gray, Albert W. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Virginia. 


Griffith, E. J. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Hale, Charles F. 


Dr. Benjamin Carr, 


Connecticut, 


Hammond, Milton, 


Md. Medical Institute 


, Pennsylvania. 


Haughton, Edward B. 


Dr. H. E. Lewis, 


North Carolina, 


Harris, Adam C. 


Dr. White, 


a 


Hawkins, P. Wood 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Hays, George T. 


Dr. J. G. Hays, 


Virginia. 


Heagy, G. M. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Heaton, Vincent B. 


Dr. J. Montgomery, 


(( 


Henkle, E. J. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


a 


Hood, George H. 


Dr. James Hood, 


Ohio. 


Hood, Thomas B. 


Dr. James Hood, 


u 


Hoffman, Alfred 




Maryland 


Hollingsworth, Robert 


Dr. John Evans, 


a 


Hyland, Henry G. 


Prof. Smith, 


(( 


Ireland, James G. 


Dr. L. L. Weems, 


a 


Johnson, William J, 




Virginia 


Jones, Buckler 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Jones, Charles H. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


u 


Jones, J. H. 


Dr. W. B. Wood, 


cc ■ -^ 


KeflTer, William H. 


Md. Medical Institute 


, Virginia. 


Keith, James B. 


Prof. Chew, 


North Carolina 


Kennedy, A. T. 


Dr. S. D. Scott, 


Virginia. 


Keyser, Charles C. 


Prof. Chew* 


Maryland 


Kidd, William 


Dr. R. Sidwell, 


a 


King, John T. 


Dr. J. K. Handy, 


u 


Knight, G. S. 


Dr. Knight, 


u 


Koch, Francis A. R. 


Dr. Koch, 


Pennsylvania. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDENTS. 



Large, Jonathan L. 
Lynch, Francis E. 
Mackall, Louis 
Mackie, J. A., M. D. 
Mason, D. H., M. D. 
Mass, Frankhn 
Marsters, William C. 

May, Bush rod L. 

McAlpine, George 
-McIIvain, John E. 
McKew, Dennis J. 
McMillan, N. G., M. D. 
Merryman, M. W. 
Millar, John W. 
Miller, A. W. 
Minor, J. H. 
Montgomery, W. T. 
Mumma, Edward W. 
Murdoch, Thomas F. 
Myers, Louis, M. D. 
Nalley, Robert J. R. 
Norris, Basil, M. D. 
Nowland, E. F. 
O'Donnell, Charles 
Parke, Joseph M. 
Pettit, A. T. 
Powell, John F. 
Pratt, S. H,, M. D. 
Priestley, Edward 
Purnell, James B. R. 
Pye, Charles H. 
Rankin, Robert G. 
Readel, J. D. 
Richard, Victor P. 
Rider, Charles E. 
Richardson, W. E. 



PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Dr. Stevenson, Pennsylvania. 

Prof. Chew, Virginia. 

Dr. Louis Mackall, Maryland. 

New York. 
Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. S. S. Downing, Virginia. 
Dr. Wm. Gillespie, \ ,, 
Dr. J no. Fauntleroy, j 
Prof. Dunbar, Mississippi. 

Dr. W. McIIvain, Pennsylvania. 
Md. Medical Institute, Maryland. 

Ohio. 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Dr. A. H. Robertson, *' 

Dr. Stevenson, '^^ 

Dr. J. Minor, Virginia. 

Dr. J. Montgomery, Maryland. 
Dr. J. A. Read, " 

Bait. Alms House, " 

Virginia. 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 



Dr. D. M. Tindall, 


a 


Prof. Chew, 


a 


Dr. Wm. Thompson, 


Pennsylvania. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Dr. W. R. Handy, 




Dr. F. R. McManus, 


il 


Prof. Chew, 


a 


Prof. Chew, 


u 


Prof. Dunbar, 


a 


Prof. Smith, 


(( 


Dr. T. L. Murphy, 


a 


Prof. Smith, 


u 


Dr. L. Campbell, 


Virginia. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDENTS. 


PRECEPTORS. 


RESIDENCE. 


Rider, Noah S. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Ridgely,AquilaT.,M.D. 




Louisiana. 


Robbins, D. H. 


Md. Medical Institute 


, Maryland. 


Roberts, William B. 


Dr. H. F. Zolhckoffer, 


Rogers, William H. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


u 


Rogers, S. B. 




a 


Ross, W. T. H. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


u 


Sappington, R. 


Dr. Sappington, 


u 


Sasscer, Frederick 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


u 


Sewell, Franklin L. 


Dr. W. B. Day, 


Virginia. 


Sheehy, Edward L. 


Dr. J. H. Boyle, 


Maryland. 


Spindle, P. H. 


Md. Medical Institute 


, Virginia. 


Stager, Isaac R. 


Dr. Landis, 


Pennsylvania 


Steele, Thomas B.,M. D. 


U. S. Navy, 


Maryland. 


Steele, Thomas R., M. D 




Virginia. 


Steuart, James A. 


Md. Medical Institute 


, Maryland. 


Sutton, Richard E. 


Dr. J. D. Sutton, 


u 


Taylor, George 


Prof. Smith, 


u 


Taylor, G. W. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Missouri. 


Thomas, J. H. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Towson, J. T. 




(( 


Trenchard, C. J.- 


Prof. Chew, 


u 


Truett, George W. 


Prof. Smith, 


Pennsylvania 


Turner, Philip A. 


Bait. Alms House, 


Maryland. 


Walton, H. Rowland 


Bait. Ahns House, 


u 


Webster, H.W., Jr. 


Prof. Smith, 


u 


White, William 


D. L. White, ^ 
Dr. S. H.Pratt, 5" 


Pennsylvania 


White, Henry M. D. 






Whittingham, Edward T. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Wilkins, John 


Bait. Alms House, 


a 


Wilkins, Joseph, M. D. 




u 


WiUiard, A. P. 


Prof. Chew, 


a 


Wilmer, William R. 


Prof Chew, 


u 


Wilson, Henry M. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


a 


Wood, Edward W. 


Prof. Chew, 


a 


Wroth William J. 


Dr. P. W^roth, 


u 



GRADUATES. 



A( the Annual Commencement heldin Marchy 1849, sixty -eight 
candidates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



Baldwin, Julius A. 
Belt, W. Seton, 
Billingsley, J. A. T. 
Bird, William P. 
Blakiston, R. Pinkney 
Boarman, Charles 
Brace, Russel 
Brown, Septimus 
Carter, George W. 
Carter, Walter K. 
Chamberlaine, J. E. M 
Cowman, R. H. 
Cronmiller, Thomas Le 
Davidson, C. H. W. 
Dorsey, William P. 
Duhamel, W. J. C. 
Dusenbury, E. L. F. 
Emory, D. C. H. 
Fergusson, Oscar A. 
*Glisan, Rodney 
Gough, Richard T. 
Grafton, William H. 
Hance, Thomas C. 
Hammond, T. W. 
Hardey, Thomas E. 
Harrell, W. B. 
Hendrix, Joseph W. 
Hurst, George N. 
Jenkins, Felix 
Jew-ett, J. Gushing 



SUBJECT OF THESIS. RESIDEKCE. 


Diseases of the Liver, 


Md. 


Phthisis Pulmonalis, 


(C 


Acute Hydrocephalus, 


u 


Pneumonia, 


ii 


Practical Obstetrics, 


u 


Angina Pectoris, 


Va. 


Phthisis Pulmonalis, 


Md. 


Iritis, 


<i 


Moral Treatment of Disease, 


, Va. 


General Dropsy, 


Md. 


Clinical Report of Cases, 


<c 


Hasmorrhage, 


a 


, Cholera Infantum, 


(t 


Changes of Medical Practice 


> 


Sources of Malaria, 


a 


Chnical Report of Cases, 


u 


Cholera, 


N. C, 


Epidemic Cholera, 


Md. 


Remittent Fever, 


u 


Yellow Fever, 


u 


Acute Laryngitis, 


cc 


Clinical Report of Cases, 


c« 


Acute Gastritis, 


u 


Pneumonia, 


cc 


Scarlet Fever, 


cc 


Apoplexy, 


cc 


Duties of the Physician, 


N. C 


Inflammation, 


Ky. 


Acute Pleurisy, 


Md. 


Generation, 


cc 



GRADUATES. 


9 


SUB.JECT OF THESIS. RESIDENCE. 


Phthisis Pulmonalis, 


u 


Pneumonia, 


ii 


Typhoid Fever, 


u 


Diagnosis of Cardiac Disease, 


) 


Paralysis, 


a 


Pericarditis, 


Va. 


Brain and Spinal Marrow, 


Md. 


Apoplexy, 


u 


Acute Rheumatism, 


c< 


Phenomena of Digestion, 


Ya, 


Pleurisy, 


Md. 


Asiatic Cholera, 


(( 


Clinical Report of Cases, 


Va. 


Chnical Report of Cases, 


Md. 


Dysentery, 


u 


Dyspepsia, 


a 


Hydrocele, 


« 


Pneumonia, 


u 


Tetanus, 


a 


Inflammation, 


c: 


Syphilis, 


'• 


Clinical Report of Cases, 


t: 


Cinchona, 


a 


Gun Shot Wounds, 


III. 


Clinical Report of Cases, 


Ga. 


Typhus Fever, 


Va. 


Influence of Nature on Man 


, Md. 


Scarlet Fever, 


a 


Clinical Report of Cases, 


Va. 


Croup, 


Md. 


Clinical Report of Cases, 


a 


Remittent Fever, 


C( 


Phlegmasia Dolens, 


n 


Typhoid Fever, 


N. 0. 


Scarlet Fever, 


Md. 


Epidemic Cholera, 


i( 



*Johns,E. W. 
Johnson, Richard P. 
Johnson, William H. 
Lake, Robert P. 
Larkin, W. D. F. 
Leach, Richard V. 
Lester, Shipley, Jr. 
Love, Eli N. 
Lumsdon, William O. 
Mace, Samuel V. 
*Magruder, D. L. 
Massey, C. H. B. 
McQ,uinn, William 
Melvin, McCarty B. 
Miller, James W. 
Mills, Sylvanus B. 
Mundell, John H. 
Nelson, Louis F. 
Newman, W. G. H. 
Norris, Basil 
Owens, A. G. C. 
Peach, William E. 
Pratt, Stephen H. 
Price, Edward B. 
Read, James B. 
Read, John L. 
Smith, Berwick B. 
Spencer, Francis 
Steele, Thomas R. 
Thomas, Daniel W. 
Thomas, Edwin S. 
Thomas, G. S. C. 
Webster, G. W. 
White, G. P. 
White, William 
Wysham, William E. 

* These gentlemen have passed a successful examination for tlie Assistant 
Surgeon's commission, United States army, since their graduation. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



The next session will begin on Monday, October 14th, 1850, 
and close on the 1st of March, 1851. 

Gentlemen who intend to enter the school, will observe that 
the lectures commence two weeks earlier than heretofore. 

The Faculty will endeavor to make the course of instruc- 
tion plain and practical ; useful in facihtating the acquisition 
of the leading principles of medical science and art, and in pre- 
paring the student for his duties as a physician. Not regarding 
public oral instruction as the only means, or method, by which 
all knowledge and preparation are to be attained, the Faculty 
feel that they have a right to exercise a judicious discrimina- 
tion as to the quantity and quaUty of instruction given, and the 
manner in w^hich the student's attention shall be directed. 
Hence it has been their aim to make their teaching, in the 
main, elementary; and to confine themselves, chiefly, to the 
exposition and illustration of those parts of medical science 
which underlie and embrace its more complex and ultimate 
problems. 

The student is supposed to come prepared, by previous 
training, with some definite conception of the nature of the 
profession he is to enter, the obhgations its study imposes, and 
a fair capacity for appreciating its truths. This assumed, it 
follows that he must at the outset perceive that public teach- 
ing cannot be, and ought not to be, the sole source from which 
he should expect or seek to gain professional knowledge ; but 
that, to be in its highest sense profitable, it must be made in 
some degree subsidiary to private study. In the public hall 
principles may be illustrated and enforced ; details must be 
left, in a great measure, to personal investigation. Whatever, 
then, may be the opinions or the practice of others, the Faculty 
of this institution will act upon the doctrine that public and 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR, ll 

private instruction should be inseparably associated, and that, 
to be useful, public instruction must be mainly devoted to the 
exhibition and elucidation of the primitive forms of scientific 
truth. They agree with one of the most eminent teachers of 
another school and section in believing that "the great purpose 
of lectures should be to teach the student how to learn for him- 
self. They are not to take the place of private individual 
study, but to inform the pupil how that study may be pursued 
to advantage. Much may be done by the teacher, in this way, 
to develop the principles according to which medical investi- 
gations are to be pursued ; to lead the student to right modes 
of thinking, reading and observing ; to aid him in forming just 
views of the proper subjects of inquiry, by laying before him 
examples of the best way of getting at the truth, and by point- 
ing out the fair proportion which should be regarded in the rel- 
ative attention paid to different branches of professional study. 
But, after all, these can only be helps. Learning is a thing 
which no one man can do for another ; the weight of education 
must fall upon the learner ; what he does not get and make his 
own, by the active exercise of his own powers, he does not get 
at all ; he must not merely receive, he must take." 

In certain respects, however, it is notorious that only the 
public institution can furnish the student with essential pre- 
liminary advantages; as, for instance, in the study of practical 
anatomy, and the clinical observation of disease. He can ob- 
tain books in any quantity, and of all varieties of quality: treat- 
ises upon all the subjects included in medicine, appear (and 
disappear) with wonderful rapidity ; he can learn to follow the 
course of an artery, or the relations of a visciis from Bourgery or 
Quain, the appearances of a hepatized lung from Cruveilhier 
or Carswell, the signs of a dislocated shoulder or strangulated 
hernia from Cooper or Lawrence ; but to be able to tie the one 
or detect and treat the others, he must be taught from actual 
demonstration and observation of the reality ; he must learn to 
apply his own senses and judgment to the appreciation of the 
actual manifestations of the dead and the living subject. The 
advantages for doing this can scarcely be found beyond the 



12 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

L'mlts of public institutions. No where, and at no time, can the 
study of anatomy be pursued so conveniently as in a public 
school, and during the period of prelijiiinary medical educa- 
tion. Neglected then, it is usually neglected for ever. The 
practitioner has no time, no opportunity, and often no incli- 
nation to apply himself to its study. It is the legitimate, 
proper and imperative pursuit of the pupil. The practicing 
physician is not unlikely to regard it as irksome and distasteful ; 
and having no means of pursuing it but by resorting to the 
public dissecting room, his pride usually conquers his con- 
sciousness of ignorance, and the opportunity he once had, and 
neglected, never returns. 

The study of practical anatomy, therefore, has been regard- 
ed as essential in all schemes of medical education. The Na- 
tional Association, recently formed for the advancement of 
medical science, has repeatedly urged upon all schools the ne- 
cessity of requiring evidence of personal attention to this 
branch of study from candidates for their honors. The Facul- 
ty of this school never acknowledged any delinquency in this 
respect; for the neglect of practical anatomy, in their classes, 
has usually been exceptional, not general. They might have 
relied with safety upon the influence of the transmitted exam- 
ple of many years, to insure the presence of their pupils in the 
dissecting room ; but knowing the importance of the matter, 
and their ability to meet the consequent demands for material, 
they decided to convert the dissecting ticket, hitherto optional, 
into an exacted one ; and for the last two sessions it has been 
required of every candidate for the diploma. Up to the pub- 
lication of the last volume of the "Transactions of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association," it appears from the report of the 
Committee on Medical Education that, with but a single ex- 
ception, (the Medical Department of Pennsylvania College,*) 
no school in either of the northern Atlantic cities imposes any 
such obligation, and that any and all of their candidates for 
graduation may be admitted to, and pass, their examination for 
the degree of Doctor in Medicine, without being called upon 
for a particle of evidence that, for purposes of practical anato- 

• Philadelphia. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 13 

my, they have ever had a scalpel in their hands. The city 
schools are referred to, because it is well known that they 
alone can furnish anatomical material in any abundance, or at 
a moderate rate. If all the schools of the northern and middle 
states be included, it will be found that only three, of sixteen, 
make the study of practical anatomy imperative, 

A second important department of public instruction em- 
braces what are technically called "Medical and Surgical 
Clinical Practice and Lectures." The demonstration and in- 
spection of the dead body is an essential preliminary to the 
study of the diseases of the living; and yet, for the great pur- 
poses and objects of medical science, it is, and ought to be, a 
subordinate preliminary. The chief duty of the physician is 
the recognition and treatment of disease; to fulfil this duty he 
must be trained to observe and comprehend the phenomena 
which disease presents. "Clinical instruction," therefore, is 
one of the demands made upon public medical schools; and, 
at its last meeting, the "American Medical Association" reit- 
erated its opinion upon this subject in the following language : 
"Resolved, That the association does not sanction or recog- 
nize ^College Clinics,' as substitutes for Hospital Chnical in- 
struction, and that the Medical Colleges be again advised to 
insist, in all instances where it is practicable, on the regular 
attendance of their pupils, during a period of six months, upon 
the treatment of patients in a properly conducted iiospital, or 
other suitable institution devoted to the reception and cure of 
the sick." 

No person at all familiar with the course of Medical Educa- 
tion can deny the propriety and necessity of such attendance 
and instruction : yet, of all the schools, from Maine to Mary- 
land inclusive, there are but three besides this in which at- 
tendance upon Chnical instruction is exacted, and no other in 
which such attendance can be insured to the student, indepen- 
dent of the favor or permission of other persons than the 
Faculty themselves. 

The Faculty feel that they have a right to speak freely upon 
this subject. For many 3''ear3 they have sustained, unaided, 



14 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

the *' Baltimore Infirmary" as a school for clinical instruction, 
have expended their private funds in enlarging it, and have 
devoted their personal attention to its management. It belongs 
to the University: all its inmates are under the special control 
of the Faculty, and no one else has power to say who shall be 
admitted, or who excluded. They can render it, therefore, 
literally a school of clinical medicine. Acute disease — disease 
in which the danger is imminent and delay fatal, which re- 
quires prompt recognition and efficient management, this is 
what the clinical student needs most to see and to learn to ob- 
serve. Of the thousands of patients, it may be, who resort to 
a "College Chnic," how many ever show themselves a second 
time f How many cases are there of remittent, intermittent, 
or typhoid fever, of pneumonia, of pleurisy, of dysentery, of 
rheumatism, of pericarditis, or of any other grave acute dis- 
ease.'* How many dislocations, common or rare, fractures, or 
other severe accidents and injuries.^ How many minor or 
major surgical operations ? How much is seen of the dietetic 
and remedial management of chronic disease ? How much 
can the student learn of the great art of physical exploration 
in thoracic and abdominal affections? An operation for cata- 
ract upon a casual patient at a "College Chnic," in presence 
of four or five hundred spectators, may, perhaps, furnish a fair 
subject for an hour's lecture upon the special characteristics of 
this disease ; but, if the patient and the pupil separate at its 
conclusion, never to meet again, it can hardly be regarded as 
a very profitable form of clinical teaching. The after treat- 
ment, how to anticipate and avert the circumstances which 
may occur to defeat the operation, how to reckon upon the re- 
sult, this is what he requires to be taught : and what he cannot 
be taught except by continued observation of the particular 
case. The diagnosis and treatment of those accidents which 
are of most common occurrence, and of most formidable con- 
sequence, bad fractures, complex dislocations, and other forms 
of injury and disease, are what properly belong to the Hospi- 
tal ward to furnish, and the clinical surgeon to exhibit and 
illustrate. A cataract, a tumor, or even an aneurism can wait, 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 15 

but a fracture, or dislocation, or bleeding artery, or strangu- 
lated hernia demands a ready hand and knowledge to guide 
it. True clinical instruction, therefore, includes a demonstra- 
tion of the actual application of medical and surgical art to the 
emergencies of practice ; shows the student how he must act 
under like circumstances, and teaches him to rely upon his 
own knowledge and judgment, guided by the recollection of 
those cases which he has had opportunities to observe. 

It has been stated, by the author of the Report before al- 
luded to, that " he is credibly informed that even in New York 
and Philadelphia not more than one in ten" [of the medical 
students] "attend regularly at the Hospitals." The Faculty 
of the University of Maryland have reason to congratulate 
themselves that this remark does not apply to their pupils : 
conscious that the advantages for hospital instruction are 
no where exceeded, they are also conscious that they are 
no where more valued. 

The Faculty refer to these two departments of medical edu- 
cation, "Practical Anatomy" and "Clinical Instruction," from 
a conviction that, in these respects, the Institution under their 
charge may challenge comparison with any school in the coun- 
try. An abundant supply of anatomical material, at a mode- 
rate pecuniary expense, is the habitual condition of the school. 
The hospital, — containing a hundred and fifty beds, admitting 
all forms of acute and chronic disease, open to the students 
without charge throughout the year, attended by members of 
the Faculty, — furnishes a great variety and amount of disease 
for medical and surgical treatment. 

In the effort which has been made to place the course of in- 
struction in the schools upon a more elevated basis, this Fa- 
culty have participated actively and sincerely. As evidence of 
their practical compliance with the recommendations made by 
the National Association, they adduce the following extract 
from their reply to a circular received from the chairman of 
one of the Committees of that body. "The Faculty have 
modified their requirements as follows : — 1st. They have ex- 
tended the session from four months to four months and a 



16 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

2d. They have created a chair of Pathological Anatomy, at- 
tendance upon which is imperative. 3d. They have made at- 
tendance upon clinical instruction, and the study of practical 
anatomy in the dissecting room, obligatory upon all candidates 
for graduation. 4th. They have for several years pursued a 
system of frequent public examinations on the lectures given 
in the hall, attendance upon which has been punctual, and the 
beneficial effects of which they can scarcely exaggerate. 
5th. They have made it optional with the student to present 
a thesis or a clinical report of cases. At the examinations in 
March (1849) thirteen such reports were presented, many of 
them drawn up with much care and ability." 

" The Faculty of this school strive to do their duty by dili- 
gent attention to the various parts assigned them. They 
neither attempt, nor expect, to make all the young men who 
resort to their lecture rooms perfect physicians. They exact 
from them assiduous attendance, reasonable devotion to study, 
fair appreciation of the subjects taught, good characters and 
habits. They allow for the difference in original capacity, 
means and opportunity, and apply no invariable test in with- 
holding or bestowing their honors. 

" They advise, and the advice is founded upon actual expe- 
rience, that students attending public lectures should be fre- 
quently examined; that constant attendance upon clinical 
practice and instruction should be exacted; and that industri- 
ous application to the study of practical anatomy should be 
required and enforced." 

" If the wishes of the Faculty, with regard to the great point 
upon which improvement in the character of the profession 
depends, could be met, no one would be sent to them with an 
inadequate amount of preliminary preparation. They do, 
honestly and uprightly, all they can to train their students in 
the love and pursuit of scientific truth ; but they are sincerely 
conscious how imperfectly many of them are prepared by pre- 
vious discipline to appreciate such truth. Hence they feel that 
the labor of " elevating the standard of medical education " 
does not belong solely and exclusively to the public teachers 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 17 

of medicine, but should be shared by the private practitioner, 
who has a better opportunity of learning and testing the capa- 
city and qualifications, physical, moral and intellectual, of 
those who enter upon the study." 

The course of instruction given in the school includes the 
Principles and Practice of Surgery, Chemistry and Pharmacy, 
Materia Medica and Hygiene, Anatomy and Physiology, The- 
ory and Practice of Medicine, Obstetrics and the Diseases of 
Women and Children, Pathological and Practical Anatomy. 

The Department of Surgery comprises daily lectures on the 
Principles and Practice of Surgery and Clinical instruction. 
The wards of the Infirmaiy constantly furnish cases requiring 
the apphcation of general remedial treatment or surgical ope- 
rations. During the last year many minor and several capital 
operations have been performed. In the lecture room Surgery 
is taught as a reality, not as an abstraction. With this object 
in view, those portions of the subject which most concern the 
practitioner are attended to; and the student is directed when 
and how to act in the most frequent, and therefore most im- 
portant, exigencies of his daily professional life. A badly 
managed fracture, or an unrecognized and unreduced disloca- 
tion, is a standing memorial of ignorance and incompetence, 
from which the conscience of the upright physician can 
scarcely escape, and from the consequences of which he is not 
unfrequently ruined in reputation and beggared in purse. To 
this division of the subject much attention is given, so that the 
nature of the accident, and the best means for treating it, may 
be clearl}^ comprehended. 

Having been actively engaged in the practice of Surgery for 
nearly thirty 3^ears, the Professor has had large experience in 
the treatment of surgical diseases, and has had occasion to 
perform, repeatedly, all the important operations. His in- 
struction is therefore, o£ necessity, in a great degree personal 
— the result of what he has seen and done, and not merely of 
what he has read — a statement of facts, and not a compilation 
of opinions. Having accumulated a large collection of prepa- 
rations, casts, drawings, surgical instruments and apparatus, 



18 ANNUAL CIRCULAR, 

he is prepared to illustrate his course in the fullest manner, 
and to exhibit to his class the apphcation of all modern 
improvements in surgical art. 

The Department of Chemistry is devoted primarily to 
leaching the elementary principles of chemical science, without 
a thorough comprehension of which no one can hope to advance 
into its more intricate portions with any assurance of satisfac- 
tion or success. The rules of chemical nomenclature, the 
phenomena and law^s of caloric, light, electricity and galvan- 
ism, the properties of simples and compounds, are displayed 
in their most intelligible aspects, with the avowed aim of thus 
placing at the student's disposal the formulae by which, ac- 
cording to his industry and inclination, he may solve the more 
difficult problems with which chemistry abounds. That all 
physicians will become expert chemists is scarcety to be 
expected; all, however, may acquire, if the disposition exist, 
reasonable familiarity with those beautiful, harmonious, simple 
and miiform laws which lie at its foundation and pervade all 
its actions: understanding which, the student may extend his 
knowledge almost infinitely — and ignorant of which, he cannot 
safely or intelligently advance a single step. The Laboratory 
of the University contains abundant materiel for preparing and 
illustrating a chemical course; and the modifications and 
improvements of modern art are constantly added. 

The Department of Materia Medica, Therapeutics and 
Hygiene includes a description of the natural history, prepara- 
tion and mode of exhibition of medicinal agents, and the laws 
and conditions under which health may be preserved and 
disease avoided. The mere enumeration of a number, large 
or small, of well-known or obscure drugs, with the safe or 
unsafe doses in which they may be given, is not looked upon 
as the end of Materia Medica; but a full history of their mode 
of production, properties and physiological action, with the 
indications governing their employment. It is an axiom in 
medicine, that "no remedy becomes such save by its timely 
use;" to determine which, involves something beyond a 
routine knowledge of the sensible qualities of a drug, or the 



ANxNUAL CIRCULAR. 19 

amount in which it may be ^orne. The principles, therefore, 
which should govern the administration of remedies, are 
carefully unfolded, as the only sure guides to attaining their 
desired effects. A cabinet of Materia Medica, containing spe- 
cimens of all the common and rare articles, and a set of 
illustrations from standard works on Medical Botany, are used 
in the course. 

The Department of Anatomy embraces the various sub-- 
divisions of this science, viz: Physiological, Descriptive and 
Surgical Anatomy. It is intended so to teach Anatomy that 
its primitive truths may be perfectly acquired, and through 
them a knowledge of its more difficult parts be enlarged and 
confirmed. x\s well might the artisan learn to make a watch 
or a steam engine by listening to a course of abstract or de- 
monstrative lectures, as the student become, in this way alone, 
an accomplished anatomist or surgeon. Public teaching and 
private study should be conjoined. While, then, earnest effort 
will be made to exhibit truthfully the structure, form, position, 
relation and uses of the different organs, it is insisted that all 
profitable knowledge of them must be gathered, under proper 
guidance, by ones-self; and that, however much may be 
taught and show^n in the public hall, personal practical exam- 
ination is absolutely and indispensably essential. The theo- 
retical anatomist can never become the dextrous and skillful 
surgeon; nor can the most tenacious memory, crowded though 
it be with the bar! parous nomenclature of anatomical science, 
stand one in much stead in those pressing exigencies of practice 
which call for prompt, prudent, efficient action, where so ne- 
thing is to be done speedily and safely, and not merely a name 
to be remembered. The instruction in Anatomy is made, 
therefore, as demonstrative as possible — especially of those 
parts which are most important. The course of an artery, the 
form of an articulation, the relations of a viscus, w^ill be of 
enduring and increasing value, when all the doctrines of 
homologues and heterologues, and the theories of morphological 
and histological development shall have faded for ever. Careful 
dissection of the parts themselves, large diagrams and colored 



20 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

drawings, after the most approvefl authorities, of which the 
Professor has a complete and unexcelled series, models and 
preparations, constitute the means of instruction. 

The Department of Theory and Practice is occupied with 
daily lectures, and clinical visits and lectures at the Infirmary. 
The lectures are an exposition of the natural history of disease 
and its management; including diagnosis, cause, anatomical 
characters and treatment. The "Theory" of Medicine is not 
understood to involve an historical or critical examination of 
all the doctrines or dogmas of past or present time, but a 
simple statement of such principles as- observation and expe- 
rience — truthful observation, real and reliable experience — 
have established. As the great source of medical truth is 
Nature, not Opinion, it is deemed useless to bestow much 
attention upon the unsubstantial and fanciful, though ingenious- 
speculations, which have risen and fallen in the progress of 
medicine, even if they happen to be fortified by the authority 
of a name or a party. The chief object will be to teach what 
is known, not to speculate about the unknown; to place before 
the student intelligible precepts for identifying disease, its 
differences and resemblances; to enable him to recognize its 
beginning, understand its progress, anticipate its event, and 
the influences which tend to produce or arrest it ; appealing, 
for confirmation and illustration of the truth of what is taught, 
to the cases v/hich are daily witnessed in the hospital wards. 
Modern medicine differs from that which has preceded it 
mainly in this: that while it esteems at their full value the 
powers of art, it also regards, and wisely regards, the powers 
of Nature; teaching the true wisdom of watching patiently, 
observing carefully, acting cautiously ; so that the operations 
of Nature being clearly understood, the ministrations of Art 
may be judiciously, efliciently and beneficial^ applied. 

To the Department of Obstetrics also belongs the considera- 
tion of Diseases of Women and Children. Obstetrics having 
made marked progress of late years, has at length assumed its 
proper rank as an important division ,pf scientific Medicine. 
Referring chiefl}^ to a process which, in the majority of instances, 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 9^ 

is naturally and healthfully conducted to a favorable termina- 
tion, it also includes those more complicated conditions which 
demand so much self-reliance and skill in the professional at- 
tendant. The surgeon often saves life by his coolness, dex- 
terity and capacity ; the obstetrician is called upon to perform 
the same office, not for one life but for two, and at a time when 
life is most desired and death most dreaded. That the many 
escape is no excuse for the ignorance through which the few- 
perish. To enforce and illustrate the conditions under which 
danger may impend, by reference to the natural process, the 
deviations from it, the accidents which occur, and the manner 
of meeting and remed3^ing them, is the purpose of scientific 
obstetrics. In a branch so eminently practical, the lessons in- 
culcated should be simple, intelligible, readily recalled, and 
prudently applied. When to act — when to forbear ; how far 
to trust Nature, and when to aid her by the resources of Art ; 
when to sacrifice the less to the more valuable fife ; in short, 
all the complications and contingencies which experience has 
demonstrated as most likely to occur, become, in turn, the sub- 
ject of consideration and discussion. The form and applica- 
tion of instruments, the mode of effecting artificial delivery, and 
other points, are fully described. All the necessary means, 
including casts, models, machines, instruments and drawings, 
are at hand, and the collection is constantly increasing. 

In the Department of Pathological Anatomy the student is 
instructed in the changes produced by disease ; in the history 
and law^s of the great pathological processes set up in the 
body, and the mode of distinguishing real morbid change from 
that which simulates it. It is notorious that no well-defined 
or reliable notions of morbid anatomy can be acquired from 
mere description, without the means of palpable and visible 
demonstration. To be able to identify an hypertrophied heart, 
or a cancerous liver, or an inflamed lung, one must see the 
real thing, or a faithful dehncation of it. In the lectures upon 
this subject, regard is had to this necessity ; and the parts 
themselves, or accurate, representations of them, are constant- 
ly referred to. In this way the elementary forms of disease 



f2 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

and their mode of development, intimate structure and spe- 
cial characteristics, the difference between morbid and cadav- 
eric change, are brought before the student, so that in practice 
he may be able to apply the test for himself, and determine 
the result. 

For the use of this chair the Faculty have purchased a most 
valuable, beautiful and extensive series of colored drawings, 
executed by an accomplished artist, under the personal direc- 
tion of a gentleman formerly connected with the "Frankhn'* 
School of Philadelphia; in addition to which, Cruveilhier's un- 
equaled work on Pathological Anatomy is used, with recent 
specimens and preparations from the hospital and museum. 

The Demonstrator has charge of the Department of Practi- 
cal Anatomy. The rooms are open early in October, and dis- 
sections can be conducted at all hours of the day, and in the 
evening until 10, P. M. They are lighted by gas, and well 
warmed. Anatomical material is supplied at a very cheap 
rate, and is usually abundant. It is doubted, indeed, whether 
the facilities, in this respect, are exceeded by those of any 
school in the country, except one or two at the extreme south. 

Baltimore, March 1, 1850. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

FELIX JENKINS, M. D., Resident Physician. 
Sister MARY CHRYSOSTOAl, Sister Superior. 



Clinical ^ssistaRts. 

0. M. BLANTON, MILTON H. CRAPSTER, ROBERT J. R. NALLEY 

JOHN J. BRUCE, R. J. DORSEY, FREDERICK SASSCER, 

PHILEMON CHE7V, Jr. M. W. MERRYMAN, HENRY M. WILSON. 



jTccs, Hcgulatio.110 fur ©rahiation, &f. 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 14th of October, 
1850, and close on the 1st of March, 18-51. 

The Fees for attendance dh lectures, are for Surgery, Chem- 
istry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Theory and Practice, Ob- 
stetrics, Jiftccn dollars each. 

The fee for the course on Pathological Anatom.y is Jive dollars^ 
and the fee for the ticket of Practical Anatomy is ten dollars. 

Every student is required to matriculate and to pay the reg- 
ular fee, which is fice dollars. No chai-ge is made for the clin- 
ical ticket. 

The matriculation and lecture tickets must be taken out at 
the commencement of the session. Notes of solvent banks of 
the states where students reside will be received in payment. 

The ticket of the lecturer on Pathological Anatom}', and the 
ticket of Practical Anatomy, are required to be taken but once. 

Candidates for graduation are required to have attended two 
full courses of lectures in this institution ; or one ij^ tliis, after 
one in some other respectable medical school. 

Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Faculty, 
at such time as may be specified, a thesis, of his own composi- 
tion, on some subject connected with medical science, and sat- 
isfy the Faculty, by appearing before them in a private exam- 
ination, of his fitness for receiving the degree of Doctor in 
Medicine. 

The several Professors are in the habit of holding weekly 
public examinations throughout the session, attendance upon 
which is recommended, though not enforced. The judgment 
of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate, is based on their 
knowledge of his general inteUigence and industry, character 
and habits, as well as upon the result of the final examination. 



24 ANNUAi;. CIRCULAR. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, continued and pro- 
longed absence from lectures are always regarded as obstacles 
to success in obtaining a degree. 

The Faculty wish it to be distinctly understood, that while 
any student who has complied with the technical requisitions, 
viz: matriculation, attendance on lectures, and the deposit of a 
thesis, may appear before them for examination, they reserve 
to themselves, and will exercise, the right, of making moral as 
well as intellectual qualification an element of their decision. 

The result of an examination i^ determined by a majority of 
votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the candidate 
may be re-examined, if he should desire it: if he decline a se- 
cond examination, he may withdraw his thesis, and resume 
the position of a candidate in whose case no decision has been 
had. 

The graduation fee (including Diploma) is twenty dollars. 

A public commencement is held soon after the close of the 
examinations, under authority of the Provost and Regents of 
the University, at which the degrees are conferred. No candi- 
date will be excused from attendance but by special vote of 
the Faculty. 

Eight students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as 
clinical assistants. The fee is eighty dollars per 3^ear, payable 
in advance. 

01?" The Janitor^ who may he found at his house on the Univer- 
sity grounds, will direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient 
hoarding houses. The exjjenses of living are as low in Baltimore 
as in any city in the country, good hoard heing ohlainahle at from 
$3 00 to S4 00 ^per week. 



MARYLAND 
MEDICAL INSTITUTE, 

No. 69 Fayette street, a few doors west of Charles street. 



This Institute is organized with a view of elevating the standard 
of Office instruction, in accordance with the design of the National 
Medical Convention. 

The members of this Association have procured, in a central part 
of the City of Baltimore, a suite of rooms for the accommodation of 
private students, to whom they offer every facility for a thorough 
prosecution of the study of the medical sciences. 

A select library containing the standard medical works ; a cabi- 
net provided with every important article of the materia medica ; 
anatomical, physiological and pathological plates and preparations 
will be placed before the student as he progresses in his studies ; 
and opportunities will also be afforded him of becoming familiar 
with auscultation and medical chemistry. 

Daily systematic readings and examinations will be held upon all 
the branches of medical education, by the preceptors in person, 
during the Spring, Summer and Autumn ; and regular examina- 
tions on the lectures during the session of the medical colleges. 

The students of this Institute will have the privilege of attending 
the daily clinics at the Baltimore Infirmary; and private clinical 
instruction will occasionally be given. 

Lectures on subjects not embraced in a University Course, illus- 
trated by plates, preparations and drawings, will be delivered during 
the Summer months. 

The Summer course of this Institution will commence on the 2d 
April next, and continue until the 12lh Octobt*r, with the exception 
of one month's vacation, beginning on the 16:h July. 

Fees — For the term of one year, including winter course, $100 ; 
for examinations, and all other office privileges during the Session 
of the Medical Colleges, alone, jp30 ; in either case in advance. 

E. W. THEOBALD, M. D., Chairman, 

No. 74 North Charles street. 

DAVID STEWART, M. D. 

No. 77 North Eutaw street. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D. 

No. 93 North Eutaw street. 

CHARLES FRICK, M. D. 

No. 70 North Charles street. 




m 



FORT Y-F O URTH 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR AND CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



HnioerBilj! of Ularalonft, 




I 




BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 

M D C C C L I . 



FORTYFOURTIl 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



EnitJersilQ of IHarglanlr, 



SESSION 1851-52 



CATALOGUE OF STUDEiNTS 



ATTENDING LECTURES SESSION 1850-51. 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 

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X. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Hon. JOHN P. KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 
FACULTY OF FHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M.D., LL. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THERAPEUTICS, MATERIA MEDICA AND HYGIENE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

WILLIAM POWER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

LECTURER ON PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY AND DEMONSTRATOR 

OF ANATOMY. 



AVILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 



DEAN, 



PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

FELIX JENKINS, M. D., Resident Physician. 
Sister MARY CHRYSOSTOM, Sister Suptnor. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 

THOMAS HENRY DUNN. WILLIAM BILLINGSLEA ROBERTS 

FRANCIS EDWARD LYNCH. JAMES HENRY THOMAS. 

LOUIS MACKALL, Jr. WILLIAM RINGGOLD WILMER. 

CHARLES HENRY PYE. HENRY PARK CUSTIS WILSON. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



The Faculty of the University of Maryland deem the pres- 
ent a proper occasion for an expression of their views upon 
the subject of Medical Education. To their own p'lpils these 
views are submitted with an assurance that they are founded 
upon sincere conviction of their truth, and to others with a 
hope that they may be received with courtesy and toleration. 

Professional education is a department of general mental 
culture. Its object is to prepare men for a specific use, by 
instructing them in the knowledge essential for the right fulfil- 
ment of such use. It is education preparatory to the actual 
performance of the duties of a responsible profession; the 
training of the senses and inteUigence to the acquisition of 
special truths by developing their powers and capacities. No 
arbitrary formula, no conventional custom, no honorary title 
can convert the uninitiated into fit followers of a liberal pro- 
fession, apart from a proper, judicious, well directed system 
of professional education; a system of careful, continued, 
methodical, scientific training. 

Such training naturally divides itself into the period imme- 
diately antecedent to entrance upon purely professional study, 
the period more immediately devoted to such study, and the 
period of active professional life. The preparation for the 
acquisition of professional knowledge, the acquisition of such 
knowledge, and the application of it. 

As the object of all education is two-fold, namely, to form 
certain habits of mind, and to impart a certain amount of use- 
ful information, it follows that in preparation for a profession, 
and especially a profession like medicine, due regard should 
be paid to each of these particulars ; and that the student 
should be prepared to enter upon scientific study with a fair 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

capacity for using the faculties he may possess, and a proper 
share of previously acquired knowledge ; with habits of mental 
discipline and with the fruits which such discipline bestows. 
He should be able so to use his mind as to be qualified, in 
some measure, to anal3^ze with penetration, to compare with 
a clear perception of real analogy, to reason with precision, 
and to apply principles to practice with ready apprehension. 
He should have acquired, through some process of mental dis- 
cipline, the ability to understand those truths which may be 
unfolded to him, and habits of diligent application. He should 
comprehend clearly that he is not merely to learn^ but to hiow, 
and to hiow that he knows. How far such preliminary training 
should extend, and what it should embrace, may be matters for 
discussion. The standard will vary with the view^s of those who 
may determine it; but that some training is necessary almost 
all will concede. Considering the character, position and pros- 
pects of medical science, it can scarcely be regarded, as too ex- 
acting or exclusive to insist, that no young man should attempt 
to enter it who has not acquired, as a sure and indispensable 
foundation, the elements of a good English education ; such as 
would be requisite for admission to any respectable college. 
To this it would be well to add some familiarity with natural 
science, and some knowledge of the ancient languages; the 
latter, because they are the ke3^s to scientific nomenclature, 
and because a knowledge of them renders such nomenclature 
"pregnant with meaning, which would otherwise be a series 
of hard, uncouth names." Above all, the student should be 
familiar with the structure and use of his own language; be 
able, literally, to read, write and spell it with accuracy and 
propriety. Language is the vehicle of thought. No train of 
reasoning can be followed, with a clear comprehension of the 
principles involved and the truths it is intended to convey, 
without ready recognition of the terms in which it is ex- 
pressed. Such training should be preliminar}^, because, once 
entered upon his professional career, the student rarely finds 
time or inclination for any thing else, and because, through 
the mental habits it has induced, it will facilitate the acquisi- 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

tion of more purely technical information. The habit of 
acquiring knowledge cannot be attained at once. It must be 
formed gradually and continuously; he who has formed it 
starts in his course with much advantage. His intellect and 
his memory will the more readily appropriate and retain the 
truths which may be offered to him. While it is true, then, 
that in practicing the art no amount of extra-professional 
learning will aid the physician in the emergencies which he 
may be called upon to meet; while no degree of scholastic 
training will stand him in stead in the reduction of a disloca- 
tion, the treatment of a hernia, or the management of a frac- 
ture, yet the general mental condition resulting from such 
training, will be likely so to influence his habits of thinking and 
reasoning, as to materially aid him in recognizing and recol- 
lecting the principles upon which the conduct of the special 
case may depend. 

This Faculty do not dictate the quantity, or quality, of pre- 
liminary education with which the pupil should begin his pro- 
fessional studies. They earnestly urge those who resort to 
their halls, not to enter upon a study so exacting as the study 
of medicine must be to those who have a right view of it, with 
inadequate preparation. The education of the youth gener- 
ally determines and involves the whole intellectual progress of 
the man. With rare exceptions, its early defects are seldom 
remedied, and never but by an amount of self-exertion dispro- 
portionate to that needful under a system of judicious timely 
training. 

The medical schools of this country have been charged with 
a desire to augment the number, without due regard to the 
qualifications, of those w^ho enter them. This Faculty dis- 
claim all such desire. They believe that the labors of the 
teacher are lightened, and his pleasure increased, in direct 
proportion to the intelligence of those w^ho listen to him. En- 
gaged in teaching a complex science, it would mortify them to 
feel that their instructions are bestowed upon those, who, 
through lack of previous disciphne, original capacity, or gen- 
eral powers of appreciation, are incapable of comprehending 
and applying them. 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

It has been suggested that the school should require evi- 
dence of preliminary preparation. The requisition would be 
valuable only so far as it was based upon a careful consid- 
eration of the qualifications of those recommended. We 
are a petition-signing and certificate-giving people : there is 
scarcely a person or an object for which a voucher cannot 
readily be obtained. The value of such voucher will depend 
upon a knowledge of the worthiness of its recipient, and of 
him who gives it : knowledge w^hich it is not always, or even 
often, easy to procure. It w^ould seem best, therefore, at least 
for the present, to leave the necessity of adequate preliminary 
discipline, and the exaction of it, to commend itself, as it W'ill 
do, to the good sense of the pupil and his instructors : private 
and public. This Faculty avow their estimate of it, as an in- 
trinsic and indispensable pre-requisite, openly and unreserv- 
edly ; and will always be reluctant to countenance the entrance 
of any person upon a course of medical study, who has not 
been subjected to a proper process of preparatory education. 

Granting the utility and need of some previous training as 
an introduction to the study of medicine, the question arises, 
how should the study itself be conducted, and with what pur- 
poses ^ The usual plan, in this country, is a combination of 
private and public instruction. Study under the direction of 
a private preceptor, and attendance upon the various courses 
of lectures delivered in medical schools. This system is 
thought to be a useful and beneficial one, and to place the stu- 
dent in a good position for acquiring a sound professional 
education. To insure its best effects, private and public 
teaching: must maintain a riofht relation to each other. Neither 
of them ought to assume the sole direction : they should be in- 
timately conjoined. A course of systematic private tuition and 
study is to be regarded as an important part of the process. 
It should embrace the reading of standard books — not merely 
those relating to the abstract science, but those which include its 
history and literature, attention, as far as possible, to its col- 
lateral branches, familiar acquisition of its nomenclature, and 
in relation to its purely demonstrative branches, a fair concep- 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 9 

tion of their nature and value : gradual introduction, under 
the eye of the instructor, to the application of the knowledge 
that is acquired, and verification of it by observation and exper- 
iment. If the private teacher cannot teach the whole science, 
he can so train the student as to enable him to perceive clearly 
what he requires to learn, and assist him in judging how, and 
where, the gaps which private study leaves can be best filled 
up. He can inculcate and enforce the habit of continued, in- 
dustrious, persevering application ; and guide him, as he 
should always be guided, into a clear perception, that whatever 
be the amount or variety of knowledge offered to him, it will 
depend mainly upon himself whether or not it will be rightly 
appreciated and appropriated. He can test his physical, 
moral and intellectual fitness for his vocation, and w^arn him 
against wasting his time and means in the pursuit of a profes- 
sion for which he may have no natural adaptation; and he 
can, and should, do all this, because he stands in more inti- 
mate relation to him than the public teacher can possibly 
attain. This relation, while it helps him to form a correct 
estimate of the individual character of his pupil, also increases 
his responsibility to the school and the profession. Whatever 
theoretical schemes for "elevating the standard of medical edu- 
cation" may be announced or adopted, the private preceptor 
should expect to bear his share of the burden. The first step is 
taken under his care, and often through his advice ; it is his 
duty, therefore, to see that it be not taken hastily or heedlessly. 
In the tendency which has been manifested to impose the whole 
responsibihty upon the public school, it is to be feared that 
the position and duties of the private teacher will be over- 
looked, and that his relation to those whom he professes to in- 
struct, in the sense in which such relation was regarded by the 
great masters of the art, will be disturbed; that there will be 
less reverence and love, and less counsel and confidence. 

In conjunction with private study, the student acquires his 
professional education by resorting to the Public School. His 
object is two-fold ; to obtain such knowledge as he cannot so 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

eadily get elsewhere, and the credentials which admit him to 
the ranks of the profession. 

The doctrine that pubHc instruction should cover the whole 
ground of medical science, is one to which this Faculty do not 
assent; they doubt, indeed, whether the best digested course 
of lectures ever did, or ever can, embrace all that is to be 
learned and taught. They regard lectures as an important 
and, in some degree, essential means of education, but not as 
the sole means ; and they fear that the teachers who profess to 
teach, and the pupils who expect to learn, all that is known in 
the various departments of medical science, even in the 
most elaborate and extensive course of lectures, wnll inevi- 
tably be disappointed and deluded. They are of opinion, 
therefore, that public teaching should be directed mainly to 
those points which cannot be so advantageously attended to 
in private study ; that it should be chiefly demonstrative, and 
especially that it should have in view, from commencement to 
conclusion, the preparation of the student for the performance 
of his practical duties. Whatever may be the case elsewhere, 
it is unquestionable that, for some years to come, the great 
body of the American medical profession will be composed of 
men who cultivate the art more than the science. Their pro- 
fessional life will be actively practical, rather than abstractly 
scientific ; and the great object of education for the mass will 
be preparation for practice. With us the physician must be 
an artist not a philosopher. The fact that whoever would be 
in, and of, the profession in this country, must be in it as a doer, 
not merely as a knower, is undeniable. It results from the 
personal position of m^ost of those w^ho enter it, and from the 
view taken by the public of their calling and their duties. The 
aim of a few may be different, but the majority of medical stu- 
dents expect to become practitioners; their final purpose is to 
become qualified to treat disease. The system of public in- 
struction that does not regard this cannot be reckoned the most 
faithful or judicious. Not to teach all that is known, this would 
scarcely be practicable, but that which is most useful. To 
bring before the student the subjects which may be chosen, in 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 11 

the most intelligible form ; illustrate their relation to his future 
duties; enforce the principles which govern them; awaken his 
attention, excite his interest, cultivate his powers of discrimina- 
tion and observation, stimulate him to the love of knowledge, 
and develop his capacity for applying it — this is what needs to 
be done, and what the conscientious teacher will strive to do. 

The branches taught in the schools of this country are, 
generally. Anatomy and Physiology, Surgery, Theory and 
Practice, Chemistry, Materia Medica and Obstetrics : all of 
them important and all susceptible, in a greater or less degree, 
of practical illustration and demonstration. To these may be 
added Medical and Surgical clinical instruction and Practical 
Anatomy. Amidst all the discussions that have arisen in 
relation to the form, mode and extent of medical education, 
two points seem to be universally conceded, viz: that the 
study of Practical Anatomy and the Clinical observation of 
disease are primitive and essential elements. 

The ground upon which the importance of these branches 
is based, is the admitted necessity of a knowledge of what 
they teach as preliminary to entrance upon practice. The 
physician who knows nothing, from personal examination, of 
the body with which he deals, is ignorant of the very alphabet 
of his profession. All his subsequent steps will be hesitating 
and uncertain, if he have not begun with a well defined out- 
line of structure and function. He cannot follow the details 
of surgical, medical or pathological instruction, without some 
knowledge of the parts to which such instruction constantly 
refers. True he may not require to be taught the ultimates 
of Anatomy, but he must be familiar with its elementary 
truths. To recognize and reduce a dislocation, he must be 
acquainted with the form and position of the bones entering 
into the articulation; to diagnose an aneurism, he must be 
able to read distinctly the disturbances of natural relation 
and function; to determine the special characters of a morbid 
alteration, he must constantly refer to his knowledge of healthy 
structure. 



12 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The need of accurate anatomical knowledge to the prac- 
titioner is universally admitted. It properly belongs to the 
public school to furnish the facilities for acquiring such know- 
ledge; the time for acquiring it is during the period of profes- 
sional preparation, and the mode in which it is to be acquired 
is by diligent personal devotion on the part of the pupil. De- 
ficiencies in other departments of medical education may be 
made up, to a considerable extent, by subsequent industry and 
application; but he who fails to become acquainted with the 
elementary truths of anatomical science during his preparatory 
pupilage usually fails for ever. Once engaged in the business 
of his profession, he has no opportunity, time or inclination to 
submit to the irksome labors of the dissecting room. What- 
ever else may be taught, or neglected to be taught, attendance 
upon a course of instruction in Practical Anatomy should be 
rigidly e^xacted, and evidence of such attendance should be 
an essential pre-requisite for admission to an examination for 
graduation. 

A second, and not less important, department of public in- 
struction, is included in what are termed ''Clinical Lectures." 
By clinical instruction is to be understood practical obser- 
vation and illustration of a given case of disease during its 
whole progress ; embracing its diagnosis, prognosis, treatment 
and pathology. The mere rehearsal to a medical class, that 
a "child has chronic bronchitis;" that this "generally arises 
from congestion of the lungs," which is relieved by secretion, 
and being "preceded by measles there is probably inflamma- 
tory action," and that, " having been treated with small doses 
of ipecacuanha, these are to be continued," with "a diet of 
bread and milk, or cream and a little rice flour, the bowels to 
be kept open with a tea-spoonful of castor oil, if necessary," 
can hardly be regarded as the highest or most profitable form 
of clinical instruction; particularly if it happen that the child 
and the class never meet again. True clinical teaching con- 
sists in the frequent observation of a disease, with reference to 
its antecedent history and present condition; the phenomena 
which develop themselves; the changes which occur, and 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 13 

the effects which remedies produce. If the patient recover, 
the observation of his convalesence ; if he die, of the altera- 
tions which the disease has induced. A lecture on the general 
pathology of cancer or tubercle, or the symptomatology of 
rheumatism or pneumonia, or the signs of dislocations and 
fractures, aneurism or hernia, is not a clinical lecture. It could 
be given in the pubHc hall quite as well as in the hospital 
ward. The living illustration must be present, not merely for a 
transient and casual examination, but for careful and continued 
observation. Clinical teaching, to answer its best purposes, 
should address the senses as well as the intellect. It is plain 
and palpable interpretation of the phenomena of disease. It 
not only reduces the dislocation, sets the fracture, relieves ib^ 
hernia, and removes the calculus, but it practically illustrates 
all the steps of the process ; exhibits the difficulties and dan- 
gers likely to be encountered, and how to avoid them; and', the 
operation over, how the subsequent management of the case is 
to be conducted. In it will be embraced, of course, cases of 
variable intensity, importance and interest. The chronic case, 
in which art is apparently inefficient, the incurable in which 
she is powerless, and the acute, in which prompt appHcation 
of her most active agents are essential to the preservation of 
life. Such teaching it is the object of the school to provide^ 
and attendance upon it should be uniformly required. From 
clinical instruction alone, can the student learn, what he must 
learn sooner or later, viz : the true relation of Nature and; Art. 
Only in the presence of real disease can he begin to under- 
stand the value of a clear conception of the power of remedies, 
and the rules which should govern their employment. The 
crude notion that the art which professes to treat all disease, is 
able to cure all disease, soon vanishes under the lessons of the 
clinical ward. There he is taught, that, " the Physician is the 
Minister and Interpreter of Nature; let him do or contrive 
what he wiff, unless he follows Nature he cannot govern her." 
To the school the student looks for the credentials which 
arc to admit him to the privileges of his profession. In seek- 
ing and bestowing these, the pupil and teacher rest unde; 



14 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

mutual responsibilities. If made the sole object on the part 
of either, abuses will inevitably arise. The diligent, intelli- 
gent, honorable and upright student, and the faithful, consci- 
entious, discriminating teacher will recognize this responsibility 
and act under its influence. No man imperfectly prepared 
for the duties of his profession has any right to expect that its 
honors shall be conferred upon him. Yet those who bestow 
those honors understand the difficulty of their position. They 
feel that no arbitrary or invariable standard can be established. 
Amongst a hundred candidates for the Doctorate, it is hardly 
possible to assume the existence of perfect equality of capacity 
or acquirement. The elements of a favorable or adverse de- 
cision must be based, to some extent, upon a knowledge of 
average fitness, general character, habits, industry and appli- 
cation. Excellence in one, and that a leading, department, may 
not unreasonably be allowed to offset moderate deficiency in 
another and subordinate one. In the most thorough scientific 
school in this country, the National Military Academy, this 
inequality is uniformly recognized. All do not, nor are all 
expected to, reach the highest standard.* The adage, ^^ Nihil 
inventum est et jjerfectum^'' is as applicable in medicine a^ in 
law. In admittins: the candidate to the honors he desires 
to obtain, it would seem best that the test should be a dis- 
criminating one, and that he be dealt with justly and liber- 
alty. By "liberally" is not meant, that "the requirements 
for admission into the profession should be placed so low that 
the door may be open to all, with as little expenditure as pos- 
sible of time, money, and industry, and with proportionably 
as small an amount of qualification." This Faculty have neither 
collectively nor individually entertained, or expressed, such 
opinions. They simply mean, that all the elements of the 

*It lias been suggested that there should be two grades in Medicine — "Bach- 
elor of Physic" and " Doctor." This is the plan of the English Universities. 
The University of Maryland confers both degrees, and for a time, this was the 
custom at Harvard University ; the degree of " Doctor" being given after a 
period of years had i)et'n passed as "Bachelor." The practical result was, 
that the '* Bachelor," fituiing himself popularly recognized and regarded as 
** Doctor," seldom took pains to obtain a second degree, and the custom was 
abandoned. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 15 

candidate's moral and intellectual character should be allowed 
due weight, and that his acceptance or rejection should be 
founded, if possible, upon actual acquaintance obtained through 
previous intercourse. The test of a single hour's examination 
can go but little way towards forming a strictly just estimate 
of capacity and knowledge. The former may pass for more 
than its value, and the latter may be merely apparent, not real. 
It is in this respect that frequent oral examinations are of use; 
they enable the teacher to calculate the intellectual ability of 
the pupil. They are also beneficial as means of education. 
The habit of submitting to them induces readiness, thoughtful- 
ness, and self-possession; trains the student to express him- 
self with precision, tests his comprehension and recollection 
of the truths taught, insures greater punctuality of attendance, 
closer attention, excites emulation, and renders the duty of a 
final decision less perplexing and laborious. 

Lastly, it should be the object of professional education to 
inspire such love for knowledge, and excite such desire for 
truth, as shall create permanent habits of acquisition and im- 
provement. Education consists not merely in imparting in- 
formation, but in educing the faculties of man. It is hterally 
the formation of the mind. It must be progressive; and its 
best purpose will remain unfulfilled, if the student carry with 
him into the scenes of active life, the delusion that the degree 
of culture he has received, through private or public teaching, 
is to be final and complete. Once recognized as a legitimate 
follower of a liberal science, it becomes him to remember that 
it is a progressive science, and that no one can make good his 
position in it who does not keep pace with its progress. As 
its highest object is Truth, and its best use the doing of Good, 
his intellect must be active to <liscover Truth and develop 
Good. 

The course of instruction given in this school is in accord- 
ance with the foregoing principles. It does not attempt an 
exposition of all that is known in the various dep:irtments of 
medical science, but aims at a clear elucidation of elementary 
principles and practical demonstration of them. It is intended 



16 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

to prepare the student for the practice of his profession; to 
incite him to seek knowledge for himself; impress upon him 
its value, and imbue him with its love. 

It includes the Principles and Practice of Surgery, Chem- 
istry and Pharmacy, Materia Medica and Hygiene, Anatomy 
and Physiology, Theory and Practice of Medicine, Obstetrics 
and the Diseases of Women and Children, Pathological and 
Practical Anatomy. 

The Surgical course comprises daily lectures on the prin- 
ciples of Surgery and clinical instruction. In the lecture 
room the principle is enforced ; in the clinical w^ard it is illus- 
trated. Those parts of the subject most interesting to the 
practitioner are selected, and carefully explained. It is not 
thought necessary or expedient to startle the student with the 
details of extraordinary operations, or to weary him wdth the 
complexities of rare forms of surgical disease, or to embarrass 
him with the dread of encountering the most difficult emer- 
gencies of the art. He is taught, plainly and inteUigibly, 
principles and their application. The management, for ex- 
ample, of those accidents and diseases which are of most 
frequent occurrence; the employment of those means which 
are simplest in their application and easiest obtained; how to 
act on the occasions which he wdll be most liable to be called 
upon to meet. Surgical instruction has sometimes been 
charged with exaggerating the difficulties of the art, and dis- 
heartening the student b}^ a formidable array of means requis- 
ite to overcome them; with dwelling too much upon the most 
complicated and unfrequent cases, to the neglect of those 
which are simple and common; and with undue appreciation 
of mere manual dexterity or mechanical skill. The self-love 
of the teacher may be flattered, and the wonder of the student 
excited, by the details of capital operations, and an exhibition of 
the celerity and coolness with which they may be performed, 
but it is questionable whether such instruction is most useful 
or proper. A surgical operation is, after all, but too often a 
confession of the incompetency of the science; it mutilates 
because it cannot cure. To the patient a limb &aved, even if 



i 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 17 

its perfect use be impaired, is worth more than the most per- 
fect stump that the most adroit operator could fashion for him. 
Surgical practice, so fiir as the most difficult operations are 
concerned, generally concentrates itself in the hands of those 
who have particularly devoted themselves to it; the general 
practitioner has usually no desire or opportunity to engage in 
it. The more common accidents happen indiscriminately to 
all; of these, all need to be inform-cd. A badly managed 
fracture, unreduced dislocation and unrecognized hernia tell 
their own story; and tell it to the disgrace of the surgeon who 
is unable to detect and treat them; they are standing memo- 
rials of his ignorance and incompetence. So also of surgical 
disease: that which is most common is absolutely most im- 
portant. The history^ of the monstrous tumors which develop 
themselves in the Chinese at Canton or Pekin, has but little 
real value for the practitioner on the banks of the Ohio. The 
attention of the student, therefore, is directed, not to those 
things which are intricate, curious and rare, but to those with 
which he will have to deal in daily practice. 

The instructions of the lecture room are illustrated in the 
clinical wards. Surgical accidents and diseases are there ex- 
hibited as realities. The general and local management of 
disease, the expediency or necessity of an operation, how it 
ma}^ be avoided, the mode of performing it, the after treatment 
needful to its success, are all brought before the student in a 
form most likely to awaken his attention and impress his 
memory. He sees the application of surgical science to the 
emergencies of practice; learns how to act under like circum- 
stances, and is taught to rely upon his own knowledge and 
judgment through the recollection of the cases he has person- 
ally observed. 

The course of Theory and Practice includes special lec- 
tures, and clinical visits and lectures at the Infirmar}^ The 
lectures are an exposition of the natural history of disease and 
its treatment. The "Theory" of medicine is not understood 
to involve a critical or historical examination of all the doc- 
trines and dogmas of past or present time, but a plain state- 
2 



13 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

ment of such principles as observation and experience — 
truthful observation and reliable experience — have estab- 
lished. Aside from some uncouthness of expression, due 
probably to his anonymous translator, Baglivi aptly describes 
the true relation of Theory and Practice. "It is the oflice of 
Theory to give the reasons of the phenomena that accompany 
disease; to make a just comparison between the antecedent 
and concomitant symptoms; to trace the occult causes of dis- 
eases, and the true source of these causes; and, in fine, to 
explain and account for many other things of that nature, by 
which the physician may be enabled to proceed more openly 
in adjusting the indications of treatment. But the peculiar 
business of Practice hes in managing the history of diseases, 
in judging of the administration of remedies, the satisfaction 
due to indications, and the adjusting of all the weighty con- 
cerns relating to the cure of diseases pursuant to the laws 
of experience." #***«« They are much mistaken 
who think they can cure diseases happily because they are 
masters of the Theory. The physician must have much 
higher thino:3 in view. He must dissect the bodies of those 
who die of distempers, and foul his fingers, to the end that he 
may find out the seat of the malady, the cause and the issue 
of the antecedent symptoms, and the event of all the effects 
taken notice of in the foregoing disease. The sick person's 
excrements and urine, his touL'ue and his eyes, his pulse and 
his face, the affections of his mind, his former way of living, 
the errors he has been guilty of in the way of conduct, and 
such other circumstances, ought to be diligently considered, in 
order to trace the genuine and natural diagnostics and prog- 
nostics of diseases, and the indications of cure. To frequent 
or boast of splendid libraries, to heap up great numbers of 
books, without using them, to make a figure at universities, 
and have a name celebrated in the modern journals of the 
learned, will contribute' nothing towards appeasing the pain of 
diseases. To compass that end, one must frequently visit the 
public hospitals and the beds of the sick, and, with an austere 
and fearless patience, observe what good or ill happens in the 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 19 

several periods of the disease; how the symptoms make their 
progress, and what event follows the administration of such 
and such remedies; whether the present disease is turned into 
one of another for.m ; what benignity, malignity or vehemence 
appears in the disease and its S3'mptoms, through all tlieir 
periods, and what method of cure is standing and perpetual." 

As the great source of truth is Nature, not Opinion, it is 
deemed useless to bestow much attention upon the unsubstan- 
tial and fanciful, though ingenious speculations, which have 
risen and fallen in the progress of medicine, even if the}^ hap- 
pen to be fortified by the authority of a name or a party. The 
chief object will be to teach what is known, not to speculate 
about the unknown; to place before the student intelligible 
precepts for identifying disease, its differences and resem- 
blances; to enable him to recognize its beginning, understand 
its progress, anticipate its event, and the influences which tend 
to produce or arrest it; appealing, for confirmation and illus- 
tration of the truth of what is taught, to the cases which are 
daily witnessed in the hospital wards. Modern medicine 
difl^ers from that which has preceded it mainly in this : tha,t 
while it esteems at their full value the powers of Art, it also 
regards, and wisely regards, the powers of Nature; teaching 
the true wisdom of watching patiently, observing carefully, 
acting cautiously; so that the operations of Nature being 
clearly understood, the ministrations of Art may be judi- 
ciously, efficiently and beneficial!}^ applied. 

In Chemistry, attention is devoted primarily to teaching the 
elementary principles of chemical science, without a thorough 
comprehension of which no one can hope to advance into its 
more intricate portions with any assurnnce of satisfaction or 
success. The rules of chemical nomenclature, tlie phenomena 
and laws of caloric, light and electricity, the properties of sim- 
ples and compounds, are displayed in their most intelligible 
aspects, with the avowed aini of thus placing at the student's 
disposal the formulae by which, according to his industry and 
inclination, he may solve the more difficult problems with 
which chemistry abounds. 



20 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The relation of Chemistry to Medicine is daily becoming 
more intimate. Physiology and Pathology are indebted to it 
for the clearing up of many of their obscurities, and upon Sur- 
gery it has bestowed one of its most brilliant and benignant 
discoveries. How far it will succeed in unraveling all the 
phenomena of living beings and their causes, can as yet hardly 
be anticipated. Such, however, is its present position, that no 
one can safely omit some knowledge of it from his medical 
education. The student may not, as he is not expected to, be- 
come an expert manipulator or a perfect analyst, but he can, 
with a reasonable amount of diligence and attention, possess 
himself of the cardinal truths which lie at its foundation and 
determine all its results ; understanding which, he may extend 
his- knowledge almost infinitely, but ignorant of which he can- 
not safely or intelligently advance a single step. Hence he is 
first taught, as he requires first to know, the elements of the 
science and their connection wnth the various sub-divisions into 
which it is broken up. He is required to begin at the beginning, 
because in no other way can he be properly conducted to the 
end. In organic chemistry, for instance, reference must be 
constantly made to the general laws of chemical action, or its 
processes can neither be explained or understood. The student 
who imagines that he can succeed in any other mode than by 
mastering the elements at the outset, instead of finding a few 
leading principles built up into a system of unexpected and 
undeniable truth, soon becomes lost in a mist of terms and 
symbols in which he sees no gleam of meaning. He is natu- 
rally perplexed, rebelled and disgusted. He finds in the study 
no advantage or satisfaction, and gives to it a reluctant and 
compulsory labor. He considers it a useless and arbitrary im- 
position, and tries to evade the task or casts it from his thoughts 
as soon as his purpose is answered. It would be better, in- 
deed, were he to enter upon his professional studies with some 
previous knowledge of the subject; his labor would be les- 
sened and his progress more rapidly advanced. Such is not 
generally the case ; the necessities of the majority must, there- 
fore, be consulted, and for them a clear elucidation of its ele- 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 21 

mentary truths is certainly the object to be aimed at and 
accomplished. 

Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Hygiene include a de- 
scription of the natural history, preparation and mode of exhi- 
bition of medicinal agents, and the laws and conditions under 
which health may be preserved and disease avoided. The 
mere enumeration of a number, large or small, of well-known 
or obscure drugs, with the safe or unsafe doses in which they 
may be given, is not looked upon as the end of Materia 
Medica; but a full history of their mode of production, pro- 
perties and physiological action, with the indications govern- 
ing their employment. It is an axiom in medicine, that "no 
remedy becomes such save by its timely use;" to determine 
which, involves something beyond a routine knowledge of the 
sensible qualities of a drug, or the amount in which it may be 
borne. The principles, therefore, which should govern the 
administration of remedies, are carefully unfolded, as the only 
sure guides to attaining their desired effects. 

Modern medicine has been reproached with caring more for 
the character^ than for the cure of disease. It is the proper pro- 
vince of Therapeutics to regard both, and to teach the prin- 
ciples upon which, the disease being known, the remedy should 
be applied. In discarding the dogma ^^remedium anccps melius 
quam miUum,^^ it has merely taken a step towards a real recog- 
nition of the true relation of disease and its remedy. It is 
most consistent with the best form of instruction, therefore, 
that the student should be taught to place a right value upon 
diagnosis, not only as indicating the existence and nature of 
the disease, but also the quality of the agents which are to be 
employed in controlling it. He should comprehend clcarl}^ 
for example, that all apoplexy does not require blood-lelling, 
or all pneumonia, antimony, or all dropsy, squill, or all syph- 
ihs, mercury. The general features of disease being given, he 
is to solve the particular problem by a careful examination of 
its distinctive elements. The general rule being established, 
he is to watch for the exceptions. The doctrine of cure may 
be conclusive for a large number of cases, yet the application 



22 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

of it to an individual case may call for material modifications; 
to detect the peculiarities which" demand these modifications, 
the practitioner must exercise his own judgment and skill. 

In Anatomy and Physiology the method pursued is practi- 
cal and demonstrative. The object is to teach Anatomy in 
such a way that its primitive truths being perfectly acquired, 
the student may enlarge and confirm his knowledge by prac- 
tical dissection and private study. No one can expect to 
become an accomplished anatomist or skillful surgeon merely 
by listening to a course, or to many courses, of abstract or 
demonstrative lectures, however elaborate or minute. As well 
might an artisan attempt to construct a steam engine, or a 
watch, solely by his knowledge of the laws of physics. Demon- 
strative exposition must be accompanied by practical examin- 
ation. While, then, every eilbrt is made to exhibit truthfully 
the position, form, relations, structure and uses of the organs, 
it is insisted that the most profitable knowledge of them must 
be acquired, under proper guidance, by the student for him- 
self and of himself; and that, however much may be taught 
and shown in the lecture hall, practical study in the dissecting 
room is indispensable and essential. Theoretical Anatomy 
cannot stand one in much stead in the exigencies of practice. 
There must be personal familiarity with the mode of display- 
ing the parts and the order in which they present themselves. 
The pupil must use his hands as well as his head. Of all 
subjects in medicine. Anatomy is the last in v^hich useful and 
available knowledge can be gained from books alone. It may 
happen, indeed, that of much that is taught and learned, but a 
small portion will ever be required in the ordinary duties of 
practice, but the knowledge of that little must be thorough 
and practical. The anatomy of the great cavities, of the 
articulations, of the blood-vessels and the relations of parts, 
are points which the practitioner will ever need to know and 
should know. Much of what he learns of the more intricate 
portions of the science will soon fade from his memory : the 
rest will remain, because he will have constant occasion to 
refer to and use it. So also of physiology — its most valuable 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 23 

truths are those which are most general in their application; 
its most appropriate knowledge is practical, not speculative, 
and the surest foundation for an extended acquaintance with 
it is a correct comprehension of its primitive and best estab- 
lished laws. To attain a perfect master}^ of either branch, in 
the fullest sense of the term, requires the devotion and indus- 
try of a life-time ; and yet, after all, the truth which results 
from such industry and devotion may be only approximative. 
In matters of scientific interest all the problems of the science 
are important; the seeker after absolute truth desires to know^ 
all that the truth embraces. The practitioner will exact less, 
because he literally uses less. No attempt is made, therefore, 
to exhaust all the details of the subject, but simply to bring 
before the student those parts of it which he can most readily 
comprehend and apply. His knowledge must be of things — 
not words. It was a saying of Harvey's that "without expe- 
rience, not other men's, but his own, no man is a proper dis- 
ciple of any part of natural knowledge; without experimental 
skill in anatomy he no better apprehends its truths than the 
man 'born blind can judge of the nature and difference of 
colors, or one born deaf of sounds." 

To the Department of Obstetrics also belongs the considera- 
tion of diseases of Women and Children. Obstetrics havino: 
made great progress of late years, has at length assumed its 
proper rank as an important division of scientific medicine. 
Referring chiefly to a process which, in the majority of in- 
stances, is naturally and healthfully conducted to a favorable 
termination, it also includes those more complicated conditions 
which demnnd so much self-reliance and skill in the profes- 
sional attendant. The surgeon often saves life by his cool- 
ness, dexterit}^ and capacity; the obstetrician is called upon 
to perform the same office, not for one hfe but for two, and at 
a time when life is most desired and death most dreaded. 
That the many escape is no excuse for the ignorance through 
which the few perish. To enforce and illustrate the condi- 
tions under which danger may impend, by reference to the 
natural process, the deviations from it, the accidents which 



24 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

occur, and the manner of meeting and remedying them, is the 
purpose of scientific obstetrics. . In a branch so eminently 
practical, the lessons inculcated should be simple, intelligible, 
readily recalled, and prudently appUed. When to act — when 
to forbear; how far to trust Nature, and when to aid her by 
the resources of Art; w^hen to sacrifice the less to the more 
valuable life; in short, all the complications and contingencies 
which experience has demonstrated as most likely to occur, 
become, in turn, the subject of consideration and discussion. 

In the course on Pathological Anatomy the student is in- 
structed in the changes produced by disease; in the history 
and law^s of the great pathological processes set up in the 
body, and the mode of distinguishing real morbid change 
from that which simulates it. It is notorious that no well- 
defined or reliable notions of morbid anatomy can be acquired 
from mere description, without the means of palpable and 
visible demonstration. To be able to identify an hypertrophied 
heart, or a cancerous liver, or an inflamed lung, one must see 
the real thing, or a faithful delineation of it. In the lectures 
upon this subject, regard is had to this necessity; and the parts 
themselves, or accurate representations of them, are constantly 
referred to. In this w^ay the elementary forms of disease and 
their mode of development, intimate structure and special 
characteristics, the difference between morbid and cadaveric 
change, are brought before the student, so that in practice he 
may be able to apply the test for himself, and determine the 
result. 

The University is in possession of ample means for illustrat- 
ing the instruction given in the various departments. A full 
collection of Anatomical, Surgical, Pathological and Obstetrical 
drawings, casts, models and preparations, with a cabinet of 
specimens in Materia Medica, and a complete chemical appa- 
ratus, are constantly in use. 

For purposes of clinical teaching it has, almost at its own 
doors, the "Baltimore Infirmary," containing a hundred and 
fifty beds, and admitting to its wards all varieties of acute and 
chronic disease. This institution is under the sole charge of 



I 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 25 

the Faculty. They regulate its management, attend the pa- 
tients, and control it exclusively and independently. , They can 
render it, therefore, literally a school of clinical medicine. 
Acute disease — disease in which the danger is imminent and 
delay fatal, which requires prompt recognition and eflicient 
management, this is what the clinical student needs most to 
see and to learn to observe. Of the thousands of patients, it 
may be, w4io resort to a " College Clinic," how many ever 
show themselves a second time.^ How many cases are there 
of remittent, intermittent, or t3^phoid fever, of pneumonia, of 
pleurisy, of dysentery, of rheumatism, of pericarditis, or of 
any other grave acute disease ? How many dislocations, com- 
mon or rare, fractures, or other severe accidents and injuries.^ 
How many important surgical operations.^ How much is seen 
of the dietetic and remedial management of chronic disease ? 
How much can the student learn of the great art of physical 
exploration in thoracic and abdominal affections.^ 

Recognizing the necessity of attendance upon hospital prac- 
tice, this school not only exacts but furnishes it. During the 
session clinical instruction is given by the Professors of Sur- 
gery and Theory and Practice, and continued to all matricu- 
lates of the school, by the attending surgeons and ph^^sicians, 
during the remainder of the year without fee. The student is 
not only exhorted to attend upon clinical teaching, but the 
privilege being offered him, he is expected to avail himself of 
it and to improve its advantages. No candidate for graduation 
can be admitted to examination until he has produced evidence 
of such attendance. 

The opportunities for the study of Practical Anatomy are, 
it is believed, unsurpassed. Anatomical material is usually 
abundant and supplied at a moderate expense. The rooms are 
open early in October, and dissection may be carried on in the 
evening as well as during the day; the rooms being lighted 
with gas. As it is an imperative condition for graduation, that 
the candidate shall produce evidence of attention to the study 
of Practical Anatomy, the Demonstrator endeavors to render 
this requisition a real benefit to the student, by devoting stated 



26 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

hours to instructing and directing him. The Faculty congrat- 
ulate themselves upon the fact that a large proportion of iheir 
classes, not content with meeting the strict letter of the re- 
quirement, show by their reappearance in the rooms for two, 
and even three, years and their dih'gent application, that they 
estimate fairly the importance of correct anatomical knowledge 
and the advantages for acquiring it. 

The Faculty of this school have no desire to indulge in 
"self-exaggeration, local or personal." They strive to do 
their duty by diligent attention to the various parts assigned 
them. They neither attempt, nor expect, to make all the 
young men who resort to their lecture rooms perfect physi- 
cians. They exact from them assiduous attendance, reason- 
able devotion to study, fair appreciation of the subjects taught, 
good characters and habits. They allow for the difference in 
original capacity, means and opportunity, and apply no inva- 
riable test in withholding or bestowing their honors. 

They advise, and the advice is founded upon actual expe- 
rience, that students attending public lectures should be fre- 
quently examined ; that constant attendance upon clinical 
practice and instruction should be exacted ; and that indus- 
trious application to the study of practical anatomy should be 
required and enforced. 

If their wishes, with regard to the great point upon which 
improvement in the character of the profession depends, could 
be met, no one would be sent to them w^ith an inadequate 
amount of preliminary preparation. They do, honestly and 
uprightly, all the}^ can to train their students in the love and 
pursuit of scientific truth; but they are sincerely conscious 
how imperfectly many of them are prepared by previous dis- 
cipline to appreciate such truth. 

They earnestly urge their pupils to" devote at least three 
3^ears to preparatory study, to attend three courses of lectures, 
and, when not engaged in attendance upon lectures, to occupy 
themselves with a course of systematic reading, under the di- 
rection of some judicious practitioner, or in one of the private 
medical schools. A hurried education, conducted with a 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 27 

view of obtaining a diploma in the shortest possible time, and 
at the smallest possible expense, is of necessity incomplete 
and insufficient. The title, without the requisite amount of 
knowledge which it Implies, always aggravates the errors 
committed, and increases, as it ought to increase, the respon- 
sibility of him who commits them. 

It is their sincere wish to extend the usefulness of the insti- 
tution committed to their charge, and to advance the progress 
of medical education. If differences of opinion exist, in rela- 
tion to the best mode of rendering this advancement most 
speedy and certain, it is to be hoped that all honest and frank 
avowal of them will be received courteously and kindly, and 
that the discussions which may happen to arise will be con- 
ducted with the dignity and forbearance which become the 
followers of a science whose highest object is Truth, and best 
reward the Good of Humanity. 

For the Committee: 

JOSEPH ROBY. 

Li Faculty meeting, February 13, 1851, aj)j)roved: 

W. E. A. AIKIN, Dean. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



185 0-5 1. 



STUDENTS 



PUECEPTORS. 



A hi, David 

Arnold, Edward x\ugustus 
Baer, Edward Ridgely 
Baldwin, Julius A., M. D. 
Bartholow, Z. Roberts 
Beall, Walter Francis 
Beard, John Wesley 
Biscoe, William Booker 
Blasser, James H. 
Borgman, Charles John 
Bromw^ell, Rob. Evans, M.D. 
Browm, Richard Watson 
Brown, Francis Charles 
Burch, John 

Burckhardt, Wm. Davidson 
Burns, Arthur, M.D. 
Burneston, Edward Reed 
Byrd, Richard WiUlg 
Campbell, Geo. Washington 
Carper, Elkanah D. W. 
Carr, Benjamin Augustus 
Carr, Mortimer A. R. F. 
Carr, Richard Wilson 
Carter, James Pendleton 
Chancy, Joseph P. 
Chunn, James Thomas 
Claytor, Wm. Quesenbury 
Cochran, William W., M.D. 



Dr. John Ahl, 

Dr. Medcalfe, 

Dr. J. R.W.Dunbar, 

Univ. of Md., 1S49, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Beall, 

Dr. T. W. Wells, 

Dr. J. H. Miles, 

Dr. B. H. Bull, 

Dr. Pol man, 

Univ. of Md., 1S50, 

Dr. Denny, 

Dr. Morris, 

Dr. W. Burch, 

Prof. Chew, 

Univ, ofMd., 1S50, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Reese, 

Prof. Smith, 



Dr. Carr, 

Dr. W. Carr, 

Dr. E. Sparks, 

Dr. Leith, 

Dr. Stonebraker, Maryland. 

Univ. of Va., 

Prof. Smitli, 

Univ. ofMd., 1S48, 



RESIDENCE. 

Pennsylv 'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Penns3dv 'a. 

Sweden. 

Maryland. 

Mar3dand. 

Virginia. 

Pennsylv 'a. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Mar}' land. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv 'a. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 



Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



30 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDE-VTS. 



PRECEPTORS. 



Cragg, Henry 
Grain, Robert 
Crawford, Abraham Nich's 
Crawford, Basil Bell 
Cooper, George Roberts 
Cunningham, Thos. Dorney 
Davis, John Payne 
Davis, Henry Watt 
Day, Edward William 
Day, John Thomas 
Dent, Walter Brewer 
Dickson, John 
Dorsey, George Mortimer 
Drach, Hanson Maurice 
Dunn, Thomas Henry 
Duvall, A. Franklin 
Emer}', Augustine Walsh 
Farinholt, Anderson Scott 
Farnandis, George Gibson 
Field, Philip Shay 
Fleming, Jenorious Kobreth 
Flemino' John Perkins 
Fhnt, James 
Flourno}^ Peter Creed 
Fontaine, J. McL. R. 
Forne\^, Cornelius Wirt 
France, Joseph 
France, George Willet 
Frey, William 
Fulton, Henry Keerl 
Garrott, John Edward 
Ghiselin, James Thomas 
Goldsborough, Henry 
Goldsmith, Robert Henry 
Gorman, Robert 
Grape, George Sanders 



Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Dickson, 
Dr. Watkins, 
Dr. Leas, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Webster, 
Dr. Nelms, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. Dashiell, 
Dr. W. Carr, 
Dr. WeUs, 
Baltimore Infirmary 
Dr. Warfield, 
Dr. Stokes, 
Dr. Haile, 
Dr. Gibson, 
Dr. Willoughby, 
Dr. Riddlemoser, 
Dr. Perkins, 
Dr. Gibbons, 
Univ. of Virginia, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Frey, 
Dr. Fulton, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. Cox, 
Dr. Hintze, 
Prof. Chew, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Indiana. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
, Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Pennsylv'a. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Florida. 
Maryland. 



\ 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



31 



PRECEPTORS. 



Gray, Albert Waterman 
Griffith, Edward Jesse 
Haines, iNIilton 
Hardey, William Henry 
Harrow, John Washington 
Hawkins, Peter Wood 
Heaton, Vincent Bosley 
Hollingsworth, Robert 
Hough, Robert Roszel S. 
Ho\Yard, Georo:e ALi2:ustus 



Dr. Dunbar, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Stubbs, 
Dr. Watkins, 
Dr. Mann, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Montgomery, 
Dr. Evans, 
Dr. Carr, 
Univ. of Viroinia, 



Humes, Georo^e Washins^ton Dr. Landis, 



Hurtt, Thomas DoUis 
Ireland, James Gideon 
Jamison, Wilham D. 
Jarrett, James Henry 
Jefferson, Charles Wesley 
Johnson, Jeremiah 
Johnson, John Benjamin 
Johnson, Ross 
Johnson, Thomas Francis 
Jones, Buckler 
Jones, Charles Hyland 
Jones, Jacob Henry 
Jones, Samuel Jordan 

Keith, James Bates 

Kelle}', George 
Kennedy, Arthur Taylor 
Kidd, Wilham Griffith 
Kidder, James Harvey 
King, John Trippe 
Kink head, Alexander 
Knight, Granville Sharp 
Knight, Samuel T., M. D. 
Knotts, George Perrigrin 
Koch, Francis A. H. 



Prof Chew, 

Prof. Chew, 

Univ. ofxMd., 1S45, 

Dr. Montgomery, 

Dr. Carroll, 

Dr. Ward, 

Dr. Garry, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Wood, 

Dr. Dunbar, 
CDrs. Ward and 
\ Fessenden, 

Dr. Bramwell, 

Dr. Scott, 

Dr. Sid well, 

Dr. Tolles, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Aikin, 

Dr. Knight, 

Univ. of Md., lS3o, 

Dr. Inloes, 

Dr. Koch, 



RESIDENCE. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'a. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mar}' land. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mar^dand. 

Maryland. 

Alabama. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

N.Hamps'c. 

Mar3dand. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pcnnsylv'a. 



3-3 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



Large, Jonathan L. 
Lassell, William Henrv 
Lincoln, Nathan Smith 
Linthicum, Asa Shinn 
Livermore, O. R. 
Lumsdon, William O., M.D. 
L3mch, Francis Edward 
Mackall, Louis Jr. 
Machenheimer, Charles Page 
Manning, Anth'y LaFayette 
Marshall, Edward Wash'n 
Marsters, William Charles 
McCleary, Jolm 
Mcllvain, John Edward 
Mills, Bernard 
Minor, John Hubhard 
Mitchell, Thomas Edward 
Mitchell, George Alfred 
Montgomery, William T. 
Moore, Samuel Lee 
Mailer, John Richard 
Mumford, David Edwin 
Mumma, Edward Woodyer 
Murray, Robert, M.D. 
Myer, Theodore, M.D. 
Neale, Francis C. 
Neel}^ Robert Fulton 
Noble, William Davis 
Nowland, Edward Foard 
O' Donovan, Charles 
Onderdonk, Henry 
O'Neill, Howard Dennis 
Owings, Thomas Boyle 
Pettebone, Philip 
Pettit, Alfred Thomas 
Piper, Jackson 



PRECEPTORS. 

Dr. Stevenson, 

Dr.Whaland, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Aikin, 

Univ. of Md., 1S49, 

Baltimore Lifirmary, 

Baltimore Lifirmary, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Edmonson, 

Dr. Farrow, 

Prof. Smith, 

Prof Chew, 

Dr. Mcllvain, 

Dr. Ledwick, 

Dr. Minor, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. MonlfTomerv, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Kinnemon, 

Dr. Spence, 

Dr. Reed, 

U. S. Army. 

Univ. ofMd., 1S23, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Wingate, 
Dr. Trites, 
Dr. O'Donovan, 
Dr. Henr}^ 

Dr. Owings, 
Dr. Ridout, 
Dr. Landis, 
Prof. Smith, 



RESIDENCE. 

Pennsylv 'a. 

Maryland. 

Massach's. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mar3dand. 

Mar viand. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv 'a. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Marjdand. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



INTar^dand. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
IMaryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Marydand. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



33 



STfUDENTS. 



PRECEPTORS. 



RESIDENCE. 



Pond, Erasmus Allington 
Powell, John Fletcher 
Price, Thomas Carnes 
Priestley, Edward 
P3'e, Charles Henry 
Quinan, Pascal Alfred 
Reed, William 
Rider, Thomas Wm. Perry 
Roberts, William Billingslea 
Robinson, Samuel SchaefFer 
Ross, William T. H. 
Seiss, Ra3^mond Sylvester 
Sewell, Franklin Lewis 
Sheehy, Edward LaFayette 
Smoot, Andrew Jackson 
Sommers, Abram Henry 
Sparrow, Lewis Griffith 
Stager, Isaac Ricord 
Steele, Thomas R., M,D. 
Stonesifer, Lewis 
Stonestreet, Edward Elisha 
Stevens, Edward Thomas 
Streets, Samuel Wesley 
Sutton, Richard Eskridge 
Taylor, George 
Thomas, James Henry 
Thomas, Bruce 
Thomas, Wm. Montgomery 
Tidings, Edwin Randall 
Tingle, E. McKnight 
Upshur, George Martin 
Vastine, Peter Eaton, M.D. 
Waters, Edmund George 
Walter, Charles 
Weis, Ezra 
White, William 
3 



Dr. Atwood, Massachu's. 

Dr. Handy, Maryland. 

Dr. Price, Maryland. 

Dr. McManus, Maryland. 
Baltimore Lifirmary, Maryland. 

Dr. Bordley, Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Dr. Rider, Maryland. 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 

Dr. Sappington, Maryland. 

Dr. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. Zimmerman, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Virginia. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. Anderson, Virginia. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. Landis, Pennsylv'a. 
Univ. of Md., 1849, Virginia. 

Dr. Short, Pennsylv'a. 

Dr. Magruder, Maryland. 

Dr. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. Van Dusen, Wisconsin. 

Dr. Leas, Maryland. 

Dr. Bowdoin, Maryland. 

Dr. Spence, Maryland. 

Jeff". College, Pennsylv'a. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. O'Neal, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 



34 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDENTS. 



PRECEPTORS. 



Whittingham, Edward T. 
Wilkins, John 
Willis, William Louis 
Wilmer, William Ringgold 
Wilson, Henry Park Custis 
Wilson, WilUam G. 
Wood, Edgar Wade, M.D. 
Wroth, William Jackson 
Wysham, William E., M.D. 



REHDENCE. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Bait. Alms House, Maryland. 
Dr. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Virginia. 
Dr. Wilson, Maryland. 

Univ. of Md., 1850, Maryland. 
Dr. Bordley, Maryland. 

Univ. of Md., 1849, Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 



At the Ammal Commencement held March \Uh, 1950, the following 
candidates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine, 



William Matthew Abell, 
Robert William Allen, 
James Ridgway Andre, 
Joseph John Anthony, 
Julian Somers Bain, 
Mahlon K. Baldwin, 
Jas. Richards Bardwell, 
James Heath Belt, 
Upton Heath Belt, 
William Henry Berry, 
Orville Martin Blanton, 
William Henry Boon, 
Jas. E. Porter Boulden, 
Marbury Brewer, 
Robt. Evans Bromwell, 
Samuel Philip Browm, 
William Hand Browne, 
John Jesse Bruce, 
Arthur Burns, 
Laur. Justinian Chabot, 
Wm. Haslett Clendinen, 
Milton Henry Crapster, 
Jos. Hitzelberger Curley, 
Henry J. P. Dickinson, 
Robert Digges, 
Edward John Dorsey, 
Richard Ireland Dorsey, 
John Aloysius Doyle, 
William F. Drummond, 
Robert Dyson, 
Edwin Ebert, 
Jno. Clarkson Eccleston, 
Alfred Edelin, 
Josh.F. Cockey Fendall, 



SUBJECTS OF THESIS. 

Death, 

Pleurisy, 

Rheumatism, 

Pneumonia, 

Delirium Tremens, 

Dysentery, 

Pneumonia, 

Scarlet Fever, 

Measles, 

Typhus Fever, 

Clinical Report of Cases, 

Pulse, 

Revulsion, 

Aneurism, 

Auscultation, 

Oil of Turpentine, 

Eremacausis, 

Uterine Hseraorrhage, 

Variola, 

Phthisis Pulmonalis, 

Peritonitis, 

Cinchona, 

Croup, 

Intermittent Fever, 

Pneumonia, 

Typhoid Fever, 

Neuralgia, 

Neuralgia, 

Inflammation, 

Chemistry, 

Enteric Fever, 

Clinical Report of Cases, 

Remittent Fever, 

Typhoid Fever, 



RESIDENCES. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Delaware. 

North Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Mississippi. 

Maryland. 

Dist. Columbia. 

Mississippi. 

Pennsylvania. 

Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

Viri^^inia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



36 



GRADUATES. 



Wm. Hughes Fitzhugh, 
Milton Hammond, 
Adam Clarke Harris, 
George Thomas Hays, 
George Wash. Heagy, 

Eli Jones Henkle, < 

William Henry KefFer, 
Charles Clinton Keyser, 
Franklin Mass, 
Bushrod LaFayette May, 
George McAlpine, 
Denis Ignatius McKew, 
John T. B. McMaster, 
Moses Wash, Merryman, 
John William Millar, 
Thos. Fridge Murdoch, 

Robert J. R. Nalley, j 

Joseph Maxwell Parke, 
James B. R. Purnell, 
Robert G. Rankin, 
John D. Readel, Jr., 
Victor Peter Richard, 
Charles Edwin Rider, 

Norah Soren Rider, > 

David H. Robbins,- 
William H. Rogers, 
Frederick Sasscer, 
Philip Sears Spindle, 
James Aloysius Steuart, 
George W\ Taylor, 
Curtis James Trenchard, 
George W. Truett, 
Philip A. Turner, 
Henry Pt. Walton, 
Henry W. Webster, Jr., 
Abraham Peter Williard, 
Henry M. Wilson, 
Edgar Wade Wood, 



SIBJECTS OF THESIS. 

Scarlet Fever, 

Signs of" Pregnancy, 

Fractures, 

Clinical Report of Cases, 

Typhoid Fever, 

Physical Signs of Dis- 
eases of Lungs, 

Pneumonia, 

Practice of Medicine, 

Prolapsus Uteri, 

Bronchocele, 

Syphilis, 

Urea and Uric Acid, 

Cod Liver Oil, 

Clinical Report of Cases, 

Signs of Pregnancy, 

Clinical Report of Cases, 

Diagnosis of Pulmon- ) 
ary Disease, ) 

Effects of Cold, 

Typhoid Fever, 

Signs of Pregnancy, 

Measles, 

Phthisis Pulmonalis, 

Cholera, 

Influence of Climate on ) 
Disease, ) 

Asiatic Cholera, 

Pneumonia, 

Pleurisy, 

Measles, 

Pathology of Fever, 

Hysteria, 

Malaria, 

Vis Medicatrix Naturae, 

Clinical Report of Cases, 

Clinical Report of Cases, 

Yellow Fever, 

Auscultation, 

Etiology, 

Intermittent Fever, 



RESIDENCES. 

Maryland. 
Pennsylvania. 
North Carolina. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Mississippi. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Missouri. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next session will begin on Wednesda}*, the loth of 
October, 18-51, and close on the 1st of March, 1852. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures, are for Surger^s Chem- 
istry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Theory and Practice, Obstet- 
rics, fifteen dollars each. 

The fee for the course on Pathological Anatomy is fee dot' 
lars, and the fee for the ticket of Practical Anatomy is Ic/i 
dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

Ten students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as 
clinical assistants. The fee is eightij dollars per year, payable 
in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement of 
the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two courses 
of Lectures in this school, or one in this af/er one in some other 
respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of tlje Fac- 
ulty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis, of his 
own composition, on some subject connected with medical sci- 
ence, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of disease, 
tlrawn up from his own observation. rVo thesis will be re- 



38 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

ceived after the time specified above, but by special vote of 
the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught in 
this school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, 
during one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medi- 
cine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, and the evi- 
dence of attendance on Lectures, must be deposited with the 
Dean, before a candidate can be admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desire it: or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

A public commencement is held soon after the close of the 
examinations, under authority of the Provost and Regents of 
the University, at which the degrees are conferred. No can- 
didate will be excused from attendance but by special vote of 
the Faculty. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate 
is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance and 
industry, character and habits, as well as upon the result of 
his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood, 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz: matriculation, attendance upon Lectures and 
the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for examina- 
tion, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the right 
of making moral as well as intellectual qualification an ele- 
ment of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and pro- 
longed absence from Lectures will always be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 39 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Smdays excepted. No persons, except Ph^'sicians and 
Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

By vote of Faculty: 

W. E. A. AIKIX, Dean. 
October 14, 1850. 

JX^ The Janitor, icho may be found at his house on the University grounds, icill 
direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The expenses of living 
are as low in Baltimore us in any city in the country, good board being obtained at from 
$3 to $4 per v:eek. 



X 



- 



i 




F O R r V . F I V r H 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR AND CATALOGUE 




OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPAKTMENT 



OF THE 



Hniocrsitn of Hlaviilanl), 




B A L 'i' I M n K : 
riUXTEl) BY SHEFiWooi) .k (o 



VI D C C C I. 1 I 



^m'^^^m 



FORTY -FIFTH 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



F T H E 



Hniyersitji of illnvjilan^. 



SESSION 1852-53, 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



Attending Lectures Session ISdI-H. 



BALTIiSIORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO. 



INI D C C C L I I . 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Hon. JOHN P. KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 
FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 



NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 



WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 



SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 



PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE 
AND CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

JOSEPH BOYD, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 



GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND 
PATHOLOGY. 



BERWICK B. SMITH, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D, 

DEAN. 



PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

FELIX JEMvIXS, M. D., Resident Physician. 
Sister MARY CHRYSOSTOM, Sister Superim'. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 



JAMES THOMAS CHUNN, M. D., 
WALTER BREWER DEXT, 
JAMES MACALESTER FLINT, 
ALBERT WATERMAN GRAY, 
ROBERT GORMAN, 



PETER W^OOD HAWKINS, 
GEO. AUGUSTUS HOWARD, M. D. 
HOWARD DENNIS O'NEILL, 
EDW. ELISHA STONESTREET, 
WILLIAM JACKSON WROTH. 



I 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 



The Forty-Fifth Annual Session will begin on Thursday, the 
14th day of October, 1852, and end on the 1st day of March, 
1853. ' .^\ 

It is the design of the Faculty to give a plain and practical, 
course of instruction : such as they consider best adapted to pre- 
pare the student for his future professional duties. Dissenting 
entirely from the doctrine, that the whole science of Medicine is 
to be taught and learned in the public school, they feel at liberty 
to select such portions of it as may be best suited to oral teach- 
ing, and best calculated to benefit and improve those who attend 
upon it. Such instruction presupposes a proper amount of pre- 
liminary preparation, fair capacity for comprehending what is 
taught, a sincere desire to profit by the opportunities offered, 
some intrinsic love of knowledge, and industry and application in 
its pursuit. It involves, on the part of the teacher, diligent devo- 
tion to the duties of his position, honest effort to display the truth 
accurately and intelligibly, wise discrimination in the choice of 
subjects for investigation, and due care that his instructions are 
presented in an attractive form. On the part of the student, 
active appreciation of what is taught, a clear perception of its 
relations to his future occupation, earnest determination to enlarge 
and extend his knowledge, and a sincere conviction that its 
quantity and quality will depend, in a great degree, upon the 
amount of personal exertion he may bestow, and the energy he 
may exercise in availing himself of the means at his command. 
The extremest exactions of the most ardent reformer of " the 
standard of Medical Education," will fail in stimulating the 
indolent, training the inefficient, and instructing the ignorant, 
unless there exist some innate consciousness that the labor of 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

acquiring, as well as of imparting knowledge, is to be performed ; 
and that the process and purpose of education are not merely the 
routine repetition of a series of doctrines and dogmas and passive 
reception of them, but a regular, methodical, continued exercise 
of the mental faculties ; so that they may be brought into right 
relation to scientific truth, and be rightly directed to discover, 
understand and apply it. The how to learn, what to learn, and 
how to use that which is learned, are the main points. Abstract 
theories of education, however rigid they may profess to be in 
testing the qualifications of the fit and rejee^'g the unfit, will 
effect little real good if the student is left tt ^pose, that every 
thing is to be done for him, and he is to do nothing for himself: 
that the discipline, through w^hich he finds entrance to a liberal 
profession, is not to be a discipline of true mental development, 
but one of mere intellectual accumulation ; extensive acquisition 
of the technicalities of science without any real conception of the 
great laws and principles from which all science springs. 

The chief value of public instruction consists in its ability to 
supply those means for acquiring professional knowledge not 
usually obtainable in a course of private study. 

It would be a mistaken estimate of its design to assume that it 
is to accomplish a complete professional education, or that it is to 
be held responsible for the condition, or position, of all those who 
constitute the Medical profession. It does not profess to do 
this. It offers to the student certain aids in eflfecting a specific 
end. It affords him certain facilities for learning those things 
which it is essential that he should learn, and W'hich he would 
not otherw^ise be likely to learn so thoroughly or so well. Its 
benefit will be proportioned to the degree of preparation, natural 
adaptation, industry, and desire for improvement he may possess. 

The object of professional education being to prepare the stu- 
dent for his duties as a practitioner, it follows, that public instruc- 
tion should be regardful of this in all that it attempts to teach. 
It should insist, that some knowledge of those parts of medical 
science which are indispensably essential should be acquired be- 
fore the responsibilities of professional life are encountered ; and 
with this exaction it should furnish the means of meeting it. Of 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

these essentials, a knowledge of the structure of the body, and of 
the diseases to which it is liable, stands at the head. Hence the 
school should be able. to teach anatomy and the observation ot 
disease practically. Anatomy, because no where else, and at no 
other time, will the student be likely to learn it. Clinical ob- 
servation of disease, because under no circumstances can it be so 
favorably pursued. From clinical instruction alone, can the stu- 
dent learn, what he must learn sooner or later, viz : the true rela- 
tion of Nature and Art. Only in the presence of real disease can 
he begin to understand the value of a just conception of the 
power of remedies, and the rules which should govern their em- 
ployment. The crude notion that the art which professes to treat 
all diseases, is able to cure all diseases, soon vanishes under the 
lessons of the clinical ward. There he is taught, that " the Phys- 
ician is the Minister and Interpreter of Nature ; let him do or 
contrive what he will, unless he follows Nature he cannot govern 
her." 

In these two main elements of public teaching the Faculty of 
this school believe that they need not fear comparison with simi- 
lar institutions in any part of the country. For clinical purposes 
they can control completely the hospital attached to the school, 
its management being in their own hands, independent of all 
direction or supervision. Created for the use of the University, 
and sustained by it, it is available for all that can be designed or 
desired in the way of practical instruction in Medicine or Sur- 
gery. In the immediate vicinity of the College, attendance upon 
it is convenient, and its wards always accessible. From informa- 
tion recently obtained, it is believed also, that abundance and 
cheapness of anatomical material are nowhere more constant con- 
ditions than in their rooms ; certainly not in any more northern 
city. 

The regular course of instruction embraces the Principles and 
Practice of Surgery, Chemistry and Pharmacy, the Principles and 
Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Anatomy and Physi- 
ology, Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women and Children, 
Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and Pathology. 

The Surgical course comprises daily lectures on the principles 



8 ANxNUAL CIRCULAR. 

of Surgery and Clinical instruction. In the lecture room the 
principle is enforced; in the clinical ward it is illustrated. Those 
parts of the subject most interesting to the practitioner are se- 
lected, and carefully explained. It is not thought necessary or 
expedient to startle the student with the details of extraordinary 
operations, or to weary him with the complexities of rare forms 
of surgical disease, or to embarrass him with the dread of encoun- 
terng the most difficult emergencies of the art. He is taught, 
plainly and intelligibly, principles and their application. The 
management, for example, of those accidents and diseases which 
are of most frequent occurrence ; the employment of those means 
which are simplest in their application and most easily obtained ; 
how to act on the occasions which he \vill be most liable to be 
called upon to meet. Surgical instruction has sometimes been 
charged with exaggerating the difficulties of the art, and dis- 
heartening the student by a formidable array of means requisite to 
overcome them ; with dwelling too much upon the most compli- 
cated and unfrequent cases, to the neglect of those which are sim- 
ple and common ; and with undue appreciation of mere manual 
dexterity or mechanical skill. The self-love of the teacher may be 
flattered, and the wonder of the student excited, by the details of 
capital operations, and an exhibition of the celerity and coolness 
with which they may be performed, but it is questionable whether 
such instruction is most useful or proper. A surgical operation 
is, after all, but too often a confession of the incompetency of the 
science ; it mutilates because it cannot cure. To the patient a 
limb saved, even if its full use be impaired, is worth more than 
the most perfect stump that the most adroit operator could fashion 
for him. Surgical practice, so far as the most difficult operations 
are concerned, generally concentrates itself in the hands of those 
who have particularly devoted themselves to it; the general prac- 
titioner has usually no desire or opportunity to engage in it. The 
more common accidents happen indiscriminately to all ; of these, 
all need to be informed. A badly managed fracture, unreduced 
dislocation and unrecognized hernia tell their own story, and tell 
it to the disgrace of the surgeon who is unable to detect and treat 
them ; they are standing memorials of his ignorance and incompe- 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. * 9 

tence. So also of surgical disease : that which is most common 
is absolutely most important. The attention of. the student, 
therefore, is directed, not to those things which are intricate, cu- 
rious and rare, but to those with which he will haveto deal in 
daily practice. 

The instructions of the lecture room are illustrated in the clini- 
cal wards. Surgical accidents and diseases are there exhibited 
as realities. The general and local management of disease, the 
expediency or necessity of an operation, how it may be avoided, 
the mode of performing it, the after treatment needful to its suc- 
cess, are all brought before the student in a form most likely to 
awaken his attention and impress his memory. He sees the ap- 
plication of surgical science to the emergencies of practice ; learns 
how to act under like circumstances, and is taught to rely upon 
his own knowled(je and jud2:ment''throuo:h the recollection of the 
cases he has personally observed. 

The course of Principles and Practice of Medicine and Clinical 
Medicine includes special lectures, and clinical visits and lectures 
at the Infirmary. The lectures are an exposition of the natural 
history of disease and its treatment. 

As the great source of truth is Nature, not Opinion, it is deemed 
useless to bestow much attention upon the unsubstantial and fan- 
ciful, though ingenious speculations, which have risen and fallen 
in the progress of Medicine, even if they happen to be fortified by 
the authority of a name or a party. The chief object will be to 
teach what is known, not to speculate about the unknown; to 
place before the student intelligible precepts for identifying dis- 
ease, its differences and resemblances ; to enable him to recognize 
its beginning, understand its progress, anticipate its event, and 
the influences which tend to produce or arrest it ; appealing, for 
confirmation and illustration of the truth of what is taught, to the 
cases which are daily witnessed in the hospital wards. Modern 
Medicine differs from that which has preceded it mainly in this: 
that while it esteems at their full value the powers of Art, it also 
regards, and wisely regards, the powers of nature ; teaching the 
true wisdom of watching patiently, observing carefully, acting 
cautiously ; so that the operations of Nature being clearly under- 



10 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

stood, the ministrations of Art may be judiciously, efficiently and 
beneficially applied. 

In Chemistry, attention is devoted primarily to teaching the 
elementary principles of chemical science, without a thorough 
comprehension of which no one can hope to advance into its more 
intricate portions wdth any assurance of satisfaction or success. 
The rules of chemical nomenclature, the phenomena and laws of 
caloric, light and electricity, the properties of simples and com- 
pounds, are displayed in their most intelligible aspects, w^ith the 
avow^ed aim of thus placing at the student's disposal the formulae 
by which, according to his industry and inclination, he may solve 
the more difficult problems with which Chemistry abounds. 

The student may not, as he is not expected to, become an 
expert manipulator or a perfect analyst, but he can, with a 
reasonable amount of diligence and attention, possess himself of 
the cardinal truths which lie at its foundation and determine all 
its results ; understanding which, he may extend his knowledge 
almost infinitely, but ignorant of which he cannot safely or intelli- 
gently advance a single step. Hence he is first taught, as he 
requires first to know, the elements of the science and their con- 
nection with the various sub- divisions into which it is broken up. 
He is required to begin at the beginning, because in no other way 
can he be properly conducted to the end. It would be better, 
indeed, w^ere he to enter upon his professional studies with some 
previous knowledge of the subject; his labor would be lessened 
and his progress more rapidly advanced. Such is not generally 
the case ; the necessities of the majority must, therefore, be con- 
sulted, and for them a clear elucidation of its elementary truths is 
certainly the object to be aimed at and accomplished. 

In Anatomy and Physiology the method pursued is practical 
and demonstrative. The object is to teach Anatomy in such a 
w^ay that its primitive truths being perfectly acquired, the student 
may enlarge and confirm his knowledge by practical dissection 
and private study. No one can expect to become an accom- 
plished anatomist or skillful surgeon merely by listening to a 
course, or to many courses, of abstract or demonstrative lectures, 
however elaborate or minute. As well might an artisan attempt 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 11 

to construct a steam engine, or a watch, solely by his knowledge 
of the laws of physics. Demonstrative exposition must be accom- 
panied by practical examination. While, then, every effort is 
made to exhibit truthfully the position, form, relations, structure 
and uses of the organs, it is insisted, that the most profitable 
knowledge of them must be acquired, under proper guidance, by 
the student for himself and of himself; and that, however much 
may be taught and shown in the lecture hall, practical study in 
the dissecting room is indispensable and essential. Theoretical 
Anatomy cannot stand one in much stead in the exigencies of 
practice. There must be personal familiarity with the mode of 
displaying the parts and the order in which they present them- 
selves. The pupil must use his hands as well as his head. Of 
all subjects in Medicine, Anatomy is the last in which useful 
and available knowledge can be gained from books alone. 
It may happen, indeed, that of much that is taught and learned, 
but a small portion will ever be required in the ordinary duties 
of practice, but the knowledge of that little must be thorough 
and practical. The Anatomy of the great cavities, of the artic- 
ulations, of the blood-vessels and the relations of parts, are 
points which the practitioner will ever need to know and should 
know. Much of what he learns of the more intricate portions 
of the science will soon fade from his memory : the rest will 
remain, because he will have constant occasion to refer to 
and use it. So also of Physiology — its most valuable truths 
are those which are most general in their application ; its most 
appropriate knowledge is practical, not speculative, and the 
surest foundation for an extended acquaintance with it is correct 
comprehension of its primitive and best established laws. No 
attempt is made, therefore, to exhaust all the details of the sub- 
ject, but simply to bring before the student those parts of it which 
he can most readily comprehend and apply. His knowledge 
must be of things — not words. It was a saying of Harvey that 
'' without experience, not other men's, but his own, no man is a 
proper disciple of any part of natural knowledge ; without experi- 
mental skill in Anatomy he no better apprehends its truths than 
the man born blind can iudcre of the nature and difference of 
colors, or one born deaf of sounds." 



12 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

To the department of Obstetrics also belongs the consideration 
of diseases of Women and Children. Obstetrics having made 
great progress of late years, has at length assumed its proper rank 
as an important division of scientific Medicine. Referring chiefly 
to a process which, in the majority of instances, is naturally and 
healthfully conducted to a favorable termination, it also includes 
those more complicated conditions which demand so much self- 
reliance and skill in the professional attendant. The surgeon 
often saves life by his coolness, dexterity and capacity ; the ob- 
stetrician is called upon to perform the same office, not for one 
life but for two, and at a time w^hen life is most desired and death 
most dreaded. That the many escape is no excuse for the igno- 
rance through which the few perish. To enforce and illustrate the 
conditions under which danger may impend, by reference to the 
natural process, the deviations from it, the accidents which occur, 
and the manner of meeting and remedying them, is the purpose 
of scientific Obstetrics. In a branch so eminently practical, the 
lessons inculcated should be simple, intelligible, readily recalled, 
and prudently applied. When to act — when to forbear; how far 
to trust Nature, and when to aid her by the resources of Art ; 
when to sacrifice the less to the more valuable life ; in short, all 
the complications and contingencies which experience has demon- 
strated as most likely to occur, become, in turn, the subject of 
consideration and discussion. 

The course on Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pathology, 
will be divided into two parts. The first includes a description 
of the natural history, preparation and mode of exhibiting medi- 
cinal agents, with the general rules for the management of dis- 
ease ; the second, the history and laws of the great pathological 
processes set up in the body and the changes they produce. The 
mere enumeration of a number, large or small, of well-known or 
obscure drugs, with the safe or unsafe doses in which they may 
be given, is not looked upon as the end of Materia Medica; but 
a full history of their mode of production, properties and physio- 
logical action, with the indications governing their employment. 
It is an axiom in Medicine, that " no remedy becomes such save 
by its timely use;" to determine which, involves something 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 13 

beyond a routine knowledge of the sensible qualities of a drug, or 
the amount in which it may be borne. The principles, therefore, 
which should govern the administration of remedies, are carefully 
unfolded, as the only sure guides to attaining their desired effects. 

In Pathology attention will be directed to the general principles 
governing the development of morbid actions, and the special 
characters by which the structural changes induced may be iden- 
tified The elementary forms of diseased products will be care- 
fully exhibited, with the method of distinguishing real alteration 
from that which simulates it. It is notorious that no well-defined 
or reliable notions of morbid anatomy can be acquired from mere 
description, without the means of palpable and visible demonstra- 
tion. To be able to identify an hypertrophied heart, or a cancer- 
ous liver, or an inflamed lung, one must see the real thing, or a 
faithful delineation of it. In the lectures upon this subject regard 
is had to this necessity; and the parts themselves, or accurate 
representations of them, are constantly referred to. 

The University is in possession of ample means for illustrating 
the instruction given in the various departments. A full collec- 
tion of Anatomical, Surgical, Pathological and Obstetrical draw- 
ings, casts, models and preparations, with a cabinet of specimens 
in Materia Medica, and a complete chemical apparatus, are 
constantly in use. 

For purposes of clinical teaching it has, almost at its own 
doors, the " Baltimore Infirmary,^'' containing a hundred and fifty 
beds, and admitting to its wards all varieties of acute and chronic 
disease. This institution is under the sole charge of the Faculty. 
They can render it, therefore, literally a school of clinical 
Medicine. 

Recognizing the necessity of attendance upon hospital practice, 
this school not only exacts but furnishes it. During the session 
clinical instruction is given by the Professors of Surgery and 
Clinical Medicine, and continued to all matriculates of the school, 
by the attending surgeons and physicians, during the remainder 
of the year without fee. The student is not only exhorted to at- 
tend upon clinical teaching, but the privilege being offered him, 
'he is expected to avail himsielfof it and to improve its advantages. 



14 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

No candidate for graduation can be admitted to examination until 
he has produced evidence of such attendance. 

The opportunities for the studj of Practical Anatomy are, it is- 
believed, unsurpassed. Anatomical material is usually abundant 
and supplied at a moderate expense. The rooms are open early 
in October, and dissection may be carried on in the evening as 
well as during the day ; the rooms being lighted with gas. As it 
is an imperative condition for graduation, that the candidate shall 
produce evidence of attention to the stydy of Practical Anatomy^ 
the Demonstrator endeavors to render this requisition a real ben- 
efit to the student, by devoting stated hours to instructing and 
directing him. The Faculty congratulate themselves upon the 
fact that a large proportion of their classes, not content v/ith meet- 
ing the strict letter of the requirement, show by their re-appearance 
in the rooms for two, and even three years, and their diligent 
application, that they estim^ate fairly the importance of correct 
anatomical knowledge and the advantages for acquiring it. 

The Faculty of this school have no desire to indulge in '' self- 
exaggeration, local or personal.'^ They strive to do their duty 
by diligent attention to the various parts assigned them. They 
rieither attempt, nor expect, to naake all theyourtg men who resort 
to their lecture rooms perfect physicians. They exact from them 
assiduous attendance, reasonable devotion to study, fair apprecia- 
tion of the subjects taught, good characters and habits. They 
allow for the difference in original capacity, means and opportu- 
nity, and apply no invariable test in withliolding or bestowing: 
their honors. 

They advise, and the advice is founded upon actual experience, 
that students attending public lectures should be frequently exam- 
ined ; that constant atten^lance upon clinical practice and instruc- 
tion should be exacted : and that industrious application to the 
study of practical anatomy should be required and enforced. 

If their wishes, with regard to the great point upon which im- 
provement in the character of the profession depends, could be 
met, no one would be sent to them \\\(h an inadequate amount of 
preliminary preparation. They do, honestly and uprightly, all 
they can to train their students m the love and pursuit of scientific 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 15 

truth ; but they are sincerely conscious how imperfectly many of 
them are prepared by previous discipline to appreciate such truth. 
They earnestly urge their pupils to devote at least three years 
to preparatory study, to attend three courses of lectures, and, when 
not engaged in attendance upon lectures, to occupy themselves 
with a course of systematic reading, under the direction of some 
judicious practitioner, or in one of the private medical schools. 
A hurried education, conducted with a view of obtaining a di- 
ploma in the shortest possible time, and at the smallest possible 
expense, is of necessity incomplete and insufficient. The title, 
without the requisite amount of knowledge which it implies,' 
always aggravates the errors committed, and increases-, as it' 
ought to increase, the responsibility of hiiii who commits them. 

By order of the Faculty, 

W. E, A. AIKINy,ii^^, ^ 

Baltimoee, Jaxitabt 15, 1S52. , -^^ . , . 



>t «•*•« ••!• •••«*>«»4 






•ku tM«««/ «» ^0UM 4>»Mf« «0»v^to I >«« 



-^••4-M<^*l^ 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



1851-52 



STUDENTS. 



/ ^ A d amo, Goorgc Frederick 
^ x Amos, Jam es Bussey 

W^nld, FH"'rr^ i ^..nM.n^ .,c. 
J 7l<444«4i50ft7-ftotrert 
^ T^jgg er, E - J wir rd-Rrdgely 

T ii rfl i d i lnHi i ^/Tlnilinrtr 

Board) John Wesley 
t^ Bennett, James Edmond 

g.Qjnr t nj '^nrr^-' Wn^hinr*^r^ 
/; BMft ' tiJU, Willijiir 'Booker 
^ Blasser, James H. 

Bargiii^ift, rharlc.? Johw 
/1 fenov¥n, R i dja 'r d Wae son 

// Brown, Geora^e Richards 

/ 

/i, ^I*u i akkr, Riggin 

^ w rinhn-r f] t ; ^ Vi Ijiia nr r> nwi f]w»^ o 



PRECEPTORS. 

Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Smith, 
Balt'e Ahns House. 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. T. W. Wells, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. L. W. Morris, 
Dr. Leas, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. S. H. Turner, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. Watson, 
Dr. John Buckler, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew, 



// Campbell, George 

/^ Carr, Benjamin Augustus 

/J Carr, John Daniels Matthews Dr. Dunbar, 

riii | fiiri iiii 1 ^Yrl ■ n Baltic Alms House, 

Gai ' toi f«J ^Q < tioomi>»n dioto n Dr. T. L. R. LeitE; ' 

/y Chandlee, Edwin 

GJaanoy^ J i ooph P . Prof. Chew,- •- 

Chi i i i nn^ i 7r > mn [ Th7mr i • fT T* Baltimore Infirmary, 

/j^Clarke, George W. Dr. Gough, 

C i lft^Upr, ^ i 1 1 i T m %j i8 c o nb umy Prof MiltenbergeT,"-* 



RESIDENCE^ 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Connecticut 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. • 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

PennsylvaV 

Sweden. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Tif^tfltS* *•• 
Marylfrrfd. 



CDrs. Goldsboroij^tl*' 
\ and Haiclcasi«l*7 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



17 



STUDENTS. 



^ "/ Sm w fn u] , ,. /i , h IT! 1 1 n i ir N ' i 1 1 1 ^ as 

Giinninglnmj Phni'loo ' Ti D . 
>^^ T>njr^ FivliiMiil WiMiiim 

i j iuM i u, II L 111) WuHu 
^^^mni}f , ^Villi'inq 

Ufliitj Wnltrr Tirn>vfrr 

Dicliiiiriy; John 
tj(||||pay^ Thornton 
^^iil*M^^JM44frm-IV, M. D. 

RrQoii^ ttanoon Mnin ' L r 

'^tiFillinttj Thntrr ^^^^"^^^^ 

l l^ nrmnrJ i n i ) r ii ncni i ^tj Gibji ' Jii 
g<ulJ, Philip OliJ> 

Flfimingj iTnnnr.iiii,i- Ki^hiTth 
E!JiM>li^*ifaiiiuii j)lLUjinh.j[er 
liiuiiuiy, Ouuii^L Wfftet 
Biioflfii Wilhuiii, h. 

nhiirlinj i Tnnmr Thnnm- 
^ i nlrlrhnrniig i hj II I iii j. T 
<' i NnJf1yuiith . T^olio i itj tlon rv 

tlrnir lAlhmt ^yntrin 

(g j j-jffirhrj V i d' i 'rni ' d i Jgi ' jc 
(jifirniin, Koi^ort- 
ITmrlPir,, Wiih'im Wnmy 
Tifcnrfj Wiliinm 
'^ IIuu'luiij, JT)hii'AIe3«Hi(ler 
T47-r|-inn,JPrlrr ^Vnn I 
linlliiigfmnrfh) Rnbort 
U niim- i lt Gourgo Angnj. ^ JM.D, 



PRCEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Dr. Dickson, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Ohio. 

Prof. Smith, Marylcuul. 

Prof. Smith, Maryhtntb 

Prof. Chew, Indiana. 

Dr. Eareckson, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Dr. Jackson, Maryland. 

Dr. N. L. Dashiell, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Univ. Md., 1849, Maryland. 
Dr. T. W. Wells, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. Dunbar,'^- iMmytsW?- ^ 

Dr. Stokes, Maryland. 

Dr. Hinize, "Maryland. 

Balt'e Alms House, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. J. Fisher, Maryl^ndf 

Prof. Miltenberge?7'^«W?nyiffrra: K 
Baltimore Infirmary, INTm^nand. Y 
Prof. Smith, iMar3land. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. Fnlton, ' '^•laTytanl 

Prof. Smith, """MTTT'y land. 

Prof. Chew, ^laryland. 

Prof. Smith, iMarylnnd. 

Dr. Hintze, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, iVfafyTand, 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Bahimore Infirmary, Florida. 
Dr. W. W. Watktns, Marjland. 
Prof. Smith, Ldnisfalj^.*' 

Dr. Mechen, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Ma'^fa'VcT.^ 
Dr. John Evans, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Virginia. 



18 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDENTS. 

Howe, Henry Albin 
Hower, J. A. Castle 
Haylfiin, T. Sommcs 
UffVPlJiiiLiuj Duud 

kolc H ncI, Jam 00 Gidnon < 

Japyfltt, JimiLj Htii r y 

{ 

Johnoon; Jor e mmli 
.Tohnrnnj Tnim Ronjnmiii 
JnhngtQn, Rfiibort 

Junta, DutlJui 

Jonc¥, Jacob Honry 

J ordan! I^- ^Iti ' toii 
•^-^ Kelley, George Bramwell 

T(inin i nfi)djT; . ^rHi^i Ta^lui, M .D. 
^"^ J^j)ii)irii]iiKrfi[iiiii. - 

'^ Kiteiiitey i a iooi ' go PoTfcgi'i g 

^'^ Koch, Francis A. H. 

J^ La.wiil, WiH ' iauj Ht -nry 
/y^, "LiwrnUfi^ Vrinh . 

Linn i i i linfNnth ' Qn Smith 
T inthini i tnij Aoa Shin n 

^/ L>nuh ; Juini S. 

^tMs ^v r i ' hyi ' miu , G-la^jiesJage 

^^ Mogruder, William Edward 
Mannii ig f; An y how} ' Lafuyc ite 
March ftU iji Bd i w t ftrd Waohing ^on 

^yJiiliiiihnl^^ Tnhn yiiln.i 

Y Marsters, William Charles 

^^'^ Mtiitin, AnditAi Jucks oii 

9'^ M uitin; Hugh 

^^ Mnitin) AYillinm Knthnn 



PRECEPTORS. 



RESIDENCE. 



Dr. Wells, ' •> New- York. ' 
Dr. M. M. Garry, Maryland.- 
Prof. Chew, •'^-•♦•-^•-Vtr^wwrn**'* 
Prof. Chew, '*■- Maryland. 

Dr. L. L. Weems, 7 ix/r^'T'l''* 
T^ f r^\ S Maryland. j_ 

Prof. Chew, 3 / ....«.»Jr 

Dr. J. Montgomery, MarylaatL. 

Prof. Chew, Marylooa.. * 

Drs. Stewart, Don->'iiT- , -, 
11 101 >31arviana. ^ 
aldson and Frick, 3 ■ug.^ 

Dr. R. Ward, ¥aIX^^v 

Dr. Garry, .,*... yiigiiiia,.^ 

Univ. of Virginia, VirgJQ[g^^ 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. > 

Prof. Miltenberger,. ^-M*rA'-Uftd*» 

Dr. B. B. Woods, Maryland. 

Univ. of Virginia, yivginia, . . 

Dr. Bramwell, Maryland,. 

Univ. of Md., 1S51, Maryland. 

Dr. Briscoe, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, JMaryland. 

Dr. Inloes, *^*m^ 

Dr. F. Koch, 



Dr. Whaland, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Sniilh, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Prof. Chew,..^., 



Maryland.. 

Peniisylv'a. 

. Maryland. 

. jMafyland. 

Massachu's. 

_., Maryland. 

Maryland. 



Prof. Che\v,..»t..,.^^ Mai 3' land. 
Dr. W. B. Miagi^j^er, Maryland. 
Dr. Edrnondson, Mai y land. 

Prof. Chew, ^larylaiid. 

Prof. Chew, ^Iar\ laud. 

Prof. Smith, .Aiaiyland. 

Dr. Hays, Marylaftd/. 

Dr. J. P. H. Shipley, Delaware. 
Dr. Cuney, Maryland/ 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



19 



PRECEPTORS. 



^^^M^&j^wtwyiiwt ilim i Jii mes 
j^ Millo, 13 ^f44^>-fd 

JVbiiaiii John Hubbwd 
f/ Mitchell, George Alfred 
rJ. •^••'ihp". 'n-i»mnn Ivl-nrd 
fj Miichell, Robert Leeds 

Miiiiiin n 1 fii I 

Mi l 11 Of; Jolwi Rii'lm rd 

jylSkivmyl \\ 11 1 lam H. 

^Villr. ^^-Ti i — '- ^^ — r,i^^: ^.^ 
r-^1Vnrrirj Willinr^ p^».y 
«r^ Nowland, Edward Foard 
Si Qi9immm v, OIu ' uIlo 
Xf O'Neiil, Howard Dennis 

(ilmijaOLj n'hnmgj Bo^4e 
y^ Peddicord, George A. 
^^ Popltini; Tijijirr AlfiTiI 
^/ I^UiboLii^, Philip 
^^ Ph,elpg, Franoio-P. 

^^ PijjLti i ^ Jtnuk ' JR/Ti 

^s- Pmvd i., John Flotcjh er 

liilirrj Thnmn ri P i i n n 
^^^ Reese, John E. 
•^ Ridor, Thomao W -ttfmnrPBrry, Prof. Smitlr,* 
^/' R iiJiihi nn, '^nniiLl H. Dr. Dunbar, 

/ft Rob i n^ran^ Chailuo B« Dr. Ring, 

Fmfifnj a W i lliam Thomaa H. Dr. Dunbar, 
^f tS'^ppingrnn, AllpUotine Aloy's Dr. Sappington 

i Soi iM ^ Raymond Syl r tg ler 
P^ iSUyg; Henry-H. 



Prof. Chew, 

Dr. U. S. Baldwin, 

Prof. Chew, 

Prof, Miitenberger, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Ford, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. Kinnemon, 

Dr. Spence, 

Prof. Smith, 

Prof. Miitenberger, 

Dr. Whaland, 

Dr. Trites, 

Dr. O' Donovan, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Dr. J. H. Owings, 

Dr. Riggs, 

Dr. Wickes, 

Dr. S. Ridout, 

Dr. A. H. Bayley, 

Dr. A. S. Magruder, 

Dr. W. E. Piper, 

Dr. Handy, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. J. F. Perkins, 



^Z v jbi a ldf J i To i lm Will i a m 
S ' ii ' j ^w jt, ' Aiidi ' nv Jcitka on 

}^ Snowden, Alfred M. 
tSniihS Tiunfis- 



Dr. Zimmerman, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. J. Shields, 
Balt'e Alms House, 
Dr. Howard, 
Dr. Slingluii; 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'a. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

A^irginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. ^ 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Ohio. 



20 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDENTS. 

^3 Spn i TOKv. » [. U' \v ' iA Giiffi th 

/■ Sibuau,VV. D. - 

^/ SiovtMJoy F.UTIM i lI Tl)t>u ias 



V 



giTC Tr t o, i Saniucl Wcck y 
T4i(iim-irjiiRinro 

^ V Tlium.is, Mu^eb ' OI ' id Av 

* T l iniiKir i ^Yillinm M n n ' j r mr r;' 

// T^id ing -ij W ^aw ' R ' nuUdH 
Vnirii ii ini fiot uf* Euluii, ]M. D . 

* ^ Wallncc, Jamps Wnsh ingtoa 

/z^ WliIiCT, OlMilcs 

/^/ Wy4^A]phnnfte-AtTgtr5tu3 

Wln i iu i i iii ^limii, UilU ' a i it ' TiRT!^ . 
^^ Wieuilhal, J. H'y St. John B. 

W ii lii, WillJRHi ' lajuLr r o 

Wiluu H yWilliuLii ' ^ . 
*y^Wise, John James 

/ 
4^ ^ WoM'tll, Pjciluiick 



RESIDENCE. 

MaryltMi^." 

'Maryland. 

Maryland-.* 

Mar yh fffel '. *' 

Pennsylv'a. 



PRECEPTORS. 

Prof. Cliew, 

Dr. R. Slenart, *" 

Dr. R. Steuart, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Prof. Smith, 

Baltimore Infirnrary^* 

Dr. Dnnbar, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, -'-'-M^y+and.- • 

Prof. Thomas, Maryland.- 

Dr. D. W. Thomas, Mwyland. 

Dr. Stevenson, WlS^Cirrsrfp/ 

Prof. Chew, - - -•■••'•¥«»i^fH«k*.-r.' 

Dr. Addison^ '■'..•*'MQryland. ^ 

Jefferson Med. Col. Pennsylv'a. 

Dr. Baldwin, 

Dr. Ward, 

Dr. O'Neal, 

Dr. F. White, 

Prof. Chew, 



Dr. Dnnbar, 
Dr. J. Wilson, 
Dr. Dunbar. 
Univ. of Virginia, 
Dr. Mobberly, 
Dr. Wroth, 



Maryland. 

M?rtykMn«l^« 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Loirisiana. 

-Maryland. 

"''•^liW^ttnd. 
"■^T^iiav 
Vfpgtnia. 
- MaryhriMk-r 
Maryland. 



Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 



*^t the Jlnnual Commencement held Mar cJi \(Hh, 1851, the following 
candidates received ike degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



SUBJECTS OF THESIS. 



RESIDENCES. 



Edward Reed Burneston, 
Elkanah D. W. Carper, 
Mortimer A. R. F. Carr, 
James Thomas Chunn, 

George Roberts Cooper, 

Robert Grain, 
Basil Bell Crawford, 
John Thomas Day, 
Thomas Henry Dunn, 
John Perkins Fleming, 
Peter Creed Flournoy, 
J. McL. R. Fontaine, 
Cornelius Wirt Forney, 
John Edward Garrott, 
Vincent Bosley Heaton, 
George Augustus Howard, 
Thomas DoUis Hunt, 
Charles Hyland Jones, 
Samuel Jordan Jones, 
James Bates Keith, 
Arthur Taylor Kennedy, 
John Trippe King, 
Jonathan L. Large, 
Francis Edward Lynch, 
Louis Mackall, Jr., 
John Edward Mcllvain, 



Malaria, Maryland. 

Cancer of Stomach, Maryland. 
Dysentery, Pennsylv'a. 

Hernia, 

Physiological Pecu- 
liarities of Female. 



Virginia. 



Maryland. 



Pneumonia, 

Rheumatism, 

Dysentery, 

Caloric, 

Wounds of Throat, 

Action of Remedies, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maiyland. 

Virginia. 

Pennsylv'a. 

Virfrinia. 



Sympat's of Stomach, Maryland. 



Opium, 

Intermittent Fever, 

Clinical Report, 

Science of Medicine, 

Remittent Fever, 

Pneumonia, 

Peritonitis, 

Gastritis, 

Dyspepsia, 

Etiology, 

Collodion, 

Malaria, 

Epidemics, 

Erysipelas, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Alabama. 

N.Carolina. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'a. 



22 



GRADUATES. 



William T. Montgomery, 
Edward Woodyer Mum ma, 
William Davis Noble, 
Al^ed Thomas Pettit, 
Edward Priestley, 
Charles Henry Pye, 
Pascal Alfred Qui nan, 
Wm. Billingslea Roberts, 
Richard Sappington, 
Franklin Lewis Sewell, 
Edward Lafayette Sheehy, 
Isaac Ricord Stager, 
Richard Eskridge Sutton, 
George Taylor, 
James Henry Thomas, 
Henry Laird Todd, 

Ezra Weis, 

William White, 

John Wilkins, 

William Ringgold Wilmer, 

Henry Park Custis Wilson, 



SUBJECTS OF THESIS. 

Rheumatism, 
Arsenious Acid, 
Inflammation, 
VisMedicat'x Naturae, 
Philosophy of Disea's, 
Diagnosis, 
Inflammation, 
Medical Ethics, 
Dysentery, 
Scarlatina, 
Chemistry, 
Action of Remedies, 
Opium, 
Atmosphere, 
Clinical Report, 
Laryngitis, 
Physiological Pecu- 
liarities of Female, 
Phlebitis, 
Clinical Report, 
Coxalgia, 
Digestion, 



RESIDENCES. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c. 



The next session will begin on Thursday, the 14th of Octo- 
ber, 1852, and close on the 1st of March, 1853. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, Chem- 
istry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Practice, Ob- 
stetrics, ^i^eew dollars each. The ticket of Practical Anatomy is 
ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

Ten students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as 
clinical assistants. The fee is 07ie hundred dollars per year, 
payable in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation and 
lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement of the 
session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon w^hose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two courses 
of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in some other 
respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Faculty, 
on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis, of his own com- 
position, on some subject connected with medical science, or a 
clinical report of not less than six cases of disease, drawn up 
from his own observation. No thesis will be received after the 
time specified above, but by special vote of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for exam- 
ination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this school. 
He must also produce evidence of attendance, during one session, 
on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be de- 



24 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

posited with the Treasurer, before a candidate can be admitted to 
examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a majority of 
votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the candidate may 
be re-examined, if he desire it ; or he may decline a second ex- 
amination, and assume the position of a candidate in whose case 
no decision has been made. 

A public commencement is held soon after the close of the 
examinations, under authority of the Provost and Regents of the 
University, at which the degrees are conferred. No candidate will 
be excused from attendance but by special vote of the Faculty. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on the 
Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is earnestly 
recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate is 
based upon their knowledge of his general attendance and indus- 
try, character and habits, as well as upon the result of his final 
examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood, that 
while any student who has complied with the technical requisi- 
tions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures and the 
deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for examination, they 
reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the right of making 
moral as well as intellectual qualification an element of their 
decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and pro- 
longed absence from Lectures will always be regarded as obsta- 
cles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 

P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 

Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms v;ithout special 

permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

By vote of Faculty : 

W. E. A. AIKIN, Dean. 

'' ^C^ The Janitor, loho may be found at his house on the University grounds, will 
direct gentlemen to cotnfortahle and convenient boarding houses. The expenses of living 
are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country, good boa^'d being obtained at from 
^3 to ^4 per week. 



F R T Y ■ S I X T II 

ANNUAL CIRCULAR AND CATALOCUE 



I 



F T H E 



MEDICAL D E P A R T M J^ N T 



V T H E 






^ 



UAiyERSITl OF HABYLAAD 







r. A LT r AI K K: 
P R I X T E D BY S II E R \V O O D k TO. 



II 



M n c r c T, I 1 I 



>.^^^^, 



/ p >. -.. J t TjS^ 




FORTY-SIXTH 



ANNUAL CIECULAE 



O F T H E 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



O F T H E 



UNIVEESITY OF MARYLAND, 



SESSION 1853-54 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



Attending Lectures Session 18524S. 



BALTIMORE: 
PTxINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 

M D C C C L I I I . 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Hon. JOHN P. KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 

FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

■ PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE 
AND CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 



GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND 
PATHOLOGY. 



BERWICK B. SMITH, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

DEAN. 

PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMART. 

FELIX JEXKINS, M. D., Resident Physician. 
Sister MATILDA COSKERY, Sister Superior. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS, 



RICHARD WATSON BROWN, 
WILLIAM Q. CLAYTOR,M. D. 
R. MERTON JORDAN, M. D. 
WILLIAM GRIFFITH KIDD, 
CHARLES O^DONOVAN, 



FRANCIS P. PHELPS, 

HENRY H. SEYS, 

EDWIN RANDALL TIDINGS, 

JAMES WASHINGTON WALLACE, 

ED. THOS. WHITTINGHAM, M. D. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 



The Forty-Sixtli Annual Session will begin on Thursday, the 
13th day of October, 1853, and end on the 1st day of March, 
1854. A general introductory to the course will be given, after 
which the regular lectures will commence. 

It is the design of the Faculty to give a plain and practical 
course of instruction : such as they consider best adapted to pre- 
pare the student for his future professional duties. Dissenting 
entirely from the doctrine, that the whole science of Medicine is 
to be taught and learned in the public school, they feel at liberty 
to select such portions of it as may be best suited to oral teach- 
ing, and best calculated to benefit and improve those who attend 
upon it. Such instruction presupposes a proper, amount of pre- 
liminary preparation, fair capacity for comprehending w^hat is 
taught, a sincere desire to profit by the opportunities offered, 
some intrinsic love of knowledge, and industry and application in 
its pursuit. It involves, on the part of the teacher, diligent devo- 
tion to the duties of his position, honest effort to display the truth 
accurately and intelligibly, wise discrimination in the choice of 
subjects for investigation, and due care that his instructions are 
presented in an attractive form. On the part of the student, 
active appreciation of what is taught, a clear perception of its 
relations to his future occupation, earnest determination to enlarge 
and extend his knowledge, and a sincere conviction that its 
quantity and quality will depend, in a great degree, upon the 
amount of personal exertion he may bestow, and the energy he 
may exercise in availing himself of the means at his command. 
The extremest exactions of the most ardent reformer of "the 
standard of Medical Education," will fail in stimulating the indo- 
lent, training the inefficient, and instructing the ignorant, unless 
there exist some innate consciousness that the labor of acquiring, 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

as well as of imparting knowledge, is to be performed ; and that 
the process and purpose of education are not merely the routine 
repetition of a series of doctrines and dogmas and passive recep- 
tion of them, but a regular, methodical, continued exercise of the 
mental faculties; so that they may be brought into right relation 
to scientific truth, and be rightly directed to discover, understand 
and apply it. The how to learn, what to learn, and bow to use 
that which is learned, are the main points. Abstract theories of 
education, however rigid they may profess to be in testing the 
qualifications of the fit and rejecting the unfit, will effect little real 
good if the student is left to suppose, that every thing is to be 
done for him, and he is to do nothing for himself: that the dis- 
cipline, through which he finds entrance to a liberal profession, is 
not to be a discipline of true mental development, but one of mere 
intellectual accumulation ; extensive acquisition of the technicali- 
ties of science without any real conception of the great laws and 
principles from which all science springs. 

The chief value of public instruction consists in its ability to 
supply those means for acquiring professional knowledge not 
usually obtainable in a course of private study. 

It would be a mistaken estimate of its design to assume that it 
is to accomplish a complete professional education, or that it is to 
be held responsible for the condition, or position, of all those who 
constitute the Medical profession. It does not piofess to do this. 
It offers to the student certain aids in effecting a specific end. 
It affords him certain facilities for learning those things which it 
is essential that he should learn, and which he would not other- 
wise be likely to learn so thoroughly or so well. Its benefit will 
be proportioned to the degree of preparation, natural adaptation, 
industry, and desire for improvement he may possess. 

The object of professional education being to prepare the stu- 
dent for his duties as a practitioner, it follows, that public instruc- 
tion should be regardful of this in all that it attempts to teach. 
It should insist, that some knowledge of those parts of medical 
science which are indispensably essential should be acquired be- 
fore the responsibilities of professional life are encountered; and 
with this exaction it should furnish the means of meeting it. Of 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

these essentials, a knowledge of the structure of the body, and of 
the diseases to which it is liable, stands at the head. Hence the 
school should be able to teach anatomy and the observation of 
disease practically. Anatomy, because no where else, and at no 
other time, will the student be likely to learn it. Clinical ob- 
servation of disease, because under no circumstances can it be so 
favorably pursued. From clinical instruction alone, can the stu- 
dent learn, what he must learn sooner or later, viz: the true rela- 
tion of Nature and Art. Only in the presence of real disease can 
he begin to understand the value of a just conception of the power 
of remedies, and the rules which should govern their employment. 
The crude notion that the art which professes to treat all disease, 
is able to cure all disease, soon vanishes under the lessons of the 
clinical ward. There he is taught, that "the Physician is the 
Minister and Interpreter of Nature; let him do or contrive what 
he will, unless he follow^s Nature he cannot govern her." 

In these two main elements of public teaching the Faculty of 
this school believe that they need not fear comparison with simi- 
lar institutions in any part of the country. For clinical purposes 
they can control completely the hospital attached to the school, 
its management being in their own hands, independent of all 
direction or supervision. Created for the use of the University, 
and sustained by it, it is available for all that can be designed or 
desired in the way of practical instruction in Medicine or Surgery. 
In the immediate vicinity of the college, attendance upon it is 
convenient, and its wards are always accessible. From information 
recently obtained it is believed, also, that abundance and cheap- 
ness of anatomical material are nowhere more constant conditions 
than in their rooms ; certainly not in any more northern city. 

The regular course of instruction embraces the Principles and 
Practice of Surgery, Chemistry and Pharmacy, the Principles and 
Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Anatomy and Physi- 
ology, Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women and Children, 
Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and Pathology. 

The Surgical course comprises daily lectures on the principles 
of Surgery and Clinical instruction. In the lecture room the 
principle is enforced; in the clinical ward it is illustrated. Those 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

parts of the subject most interesting to the practitioner are se- 
lected and carefully explained. It is not thought necessary or 
expedient to startle the student with the details of extraordinary 
operations, or to weary him with the complexities of rare forms 
of surgical disease, or to embarrass him with the dread of encoun- 
tering the most difficult emergencies of the art. He is taught, 
plainly and intelligibly, principles and their application. The 
management, for example, of those accidents and diseases which 
are of most frequent occurrence; the employment of those means 
which are simplest in their application and most easily obtained ; 
how to act on the occasions which he will be most liable to be 
called upon to meet. Surgical instruction has sometimes been 
charged with exaggerating the difficulties of the art, and dis- 
heartening the student by a formidable array of means requisite 
to overcome them ; with dwelling too much upon the most com- 
plicated and unfrequent cases, to the neglect of those which are 
simple and common ; and with undue appreciation of mere man- 
ual dexterity or mechanical skill. The self-love of the teacher 
may be flattered, and the wonder of the student excited, by the 
details of capital operations, and an exhibition of the celerity and 
coolness with w^hich they may be performed, but it is questiona- 
ble whether such instruction is most useful or proper. A surgical 
operation is, after all, but too often a confession of the incompe- 
tency of the science ; it mutilates because it cannot cure. To 
the patient a limb saved, even if its full use be impaired, is worth 
more than the most perfect stump that the most adroit operator 
could fashion for him. Surgical practice, so far as the most dif- 
ficult operations are concerned, generally concentrates itself in the 
hands of those who have particularly devoted themselves to it ; 
the general practitioner has usually no desire or opportunity to 
engage in it. The more common accidents happen indiscrimi- 
nately to all; of these, all need to be informed. A badly man- 
aged fracture, unreduced dislocation and unrecognized hernia tell 
their own story, and tell it to the disgrace of the surgeon who is 
unable to detect and treat them ; they are standing memorials of 
his ignorance and incompetence. So also of surgical disease : 
that which is most common is absolutely most important. The 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 9 

attention of the student, therefore, is directed, not to those things 
which are intricate, carious and rare, but to those with which he 
will have to deal in daily practice. 

The instructions in the lecture room are illustrated in the clini- 
cal wards. Surgical accidents and diseases are there exhibited 
as realities. The general and local management of disease, the 
expediency or necessity of an operation, how it may be avoided, 
the mode of performing it, the after treatment needful to its suc- 
cess, are all brought before the student in a form most likely to 
awaken his attention and impress his memory. He sees the ap- 
plication of surgical science to the emergencies of practice; learns 
how to act under like circumstances, and is taught to rely upon 
his own knowledge and judgment through the recollection of the 
cases he has personally observed. 

The course of Principles and Practice of Medicine and Clinical 
Medicine includes special lectures, and clinical visits and lectures 
at the Infirmary. The lectures are an exposition of the natural 
history of disease and its treatment. 

As the great source of truth is Nature, not Opinion, it is deemed 
useless to bestow much attention upon the unsubstantial and fan- 
ciful, though ingenious speculations, which have lisen and fallen 
in the progress of medicine, even if they happen to be fortified by 
the authority of a name or a party. The chief object will be to 
teach what is known, not to speculate about the unknown ; to 
place before the student intelligible precepts for identifying dis- 
ease, its differences and resemblances ; to enable him to recognize 
its beginning, understand its progress, anticipate its event, and 
the influences which tend to produce or arrest it ; appealing, for 
information and illustration of the truth of what is taught, to the 
cases which are daily witnessed in the hospital wards. Modern 
medicine diflers from that which has preceded it mainly in this : 
that while it esteems' at their full value the powers of Art, it also 
regards, and wisely regards, the powers of Nature ; teaching the 
true wisdom of watching patiently, observing carefully, acting 
cautiously ; so that the operations of Nature being clearly under- 
stood, the ministrations of Art may be judiciously, efficiently, and 
beneficially applied. 



10 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

In Chemistry, attention is devoted primarily to teaching the 
elementary principles of chemical science, without a thorough 
comprehension of which no one can hope to advance into its more 
intricate portions with any assurance of satisfaction or success. 
The rules of chemical nomenclature, the phenomena and laws of 
caloric, light and electricity, the properties of simples and com- 
pounds, are displayed in their most intelligible aspects, with the 
avow^ed aim of thus placing at the student's disposal the formulae 
by w^hich, according to his industry and inclination, he may solve 
the more difficult problems with w^hich Chemistry abounds. 

The student may not, as he is not expected to, become an 
expert manipulator or a perfect analyst, but he can, with a 
reasonable amount of diligence and attention, possess himself of 
the cardinal truths which lie at its foundation and determine all 
its results ; understanding which, he may extend his knowledge 
almost infinitely, but ignorant of which he cannot safely or intelli- 
gently advance a single step. Hence he is first taught, as he 
equires first to know, the elements of the science and their con- 
nection with the various sub-divisions into which it is broken up. 
Hi is required to begin at the beginning, because in no other way 
can he be properly conducted to the end. It would be better, 
indeed, were he to enter upon his professional studies with some 
previous knowledge of the subject; his labor would be lessened 
and his progress more rapidly advanced. Such is not generally 
the case ; the necessities of the majority must, therefore, be con- 
sulted, and for them a clear elucidation of its elementary truths 
is certainly the object to be aimed at and accomplished. 

In Anatomy and Physiology the method pursued is practical 
and demonstrative. The object is to teach Anatomy in such a 
way that its primitive truths being perfectly acquired, the student 
may enlarge and confirm his knowledge by practical dissection 
and private study. No one can expect to become an accom- 
plished anatomist or skillful surgeon merely by listening to a 
course, or to many courses, of abstract or demonstrative lectures, 
however elaborate or minute. As well might an artisan attempt 
to construct a steam engine, or a w^atch, solely by his knowledge 
of the laws of physics. Demonstrative exposition must be accom- 



ANNUAL CIRCUI-AR. 11 

panied by practical examination. While, then, every effort is 
made to exhibit truthfully the position, form, relations, structure 
and uses of the organs, it is insisted, that the most pYofitcible 
knowledge of them must be acquired, under proper guidance, by 
the student for himself and of himself; and that, however much 
may be taught and shown in the lecture hall, practical study in 
the dissecting room is indispensable and essential. Theoretical 
Anatomy cannot stand one in much stead in the exigencies of 
practice. There must be personal familiarity with the mode of 
displaying the parts and the order in which they, present them- 
selves. The pupil must use his hands as well as his head. Of 
all subjects in medicine, Anatomy is the last in which useful 
and available knowledge can be gained from books alone. 
It may happen, indeed, that of much that is taught and learned, 
but a small portion will ever be required in the ordinary duties 
of practice, but the knowledge of that little must be thorough 
and practical. The anatomy of the great cavities, of the articu- 
lations, of the blood-vessels, and the relations of parts, are 
points which the practitioner will ever need to know and should 
know. Much of what he learns of the more intricate portions 
of the science w^ill soon fade from his memory : the rest will 
remain, because he will have constant occasion to refer to and 
use it. So also of Physiology — its most valuable truths are 
those which are most general in their application ; its most 
appropriate knowledge is practical, not speculative, and the 
surest foundation for an extended acquaintance with it is a correct 
comprehension of its primitive and best established laws. No 
attempt is made, therefore, to exhaust all the details of the sub- 
ject, but simply to bring before the student those parts of it which 
he can most readily comprehend and apply. His knowledge 
must be of things — not words. It was a saying of Harvey that 
"without experience, not other men's, but his own, no man is a 
proper disciple of any part of natural knowledge; without exper- 
imental skill in anatomy he no better apprehends its truths than 
the man born blind can judge of the nature and difference of 
colors, or one born deaf of sounds." 

To the department of Obstetrics also belongs the consideration 



12 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

of diseases of Women and Children. Obstetrics having made 
great progress of late years, has at length assumed its proper rank- 
as an important division of scientific medicine. Referring chiefly 
to a process which, in the majority of instances, is naturally and 
healthfully conducted to a favorable termination, it also includes 
those more complicated conditions which demand so much self- 
reliance and skill in the professional attendant. The surgeon 
often saves life by his coolness, dexterity and capacity; the ob- 
stetrician is called upon to perform the same office, not for one 
life but for two, and at a time w^hen life is most desired and death 
most dreaded. That the many escape is no excuse for the igno- 
rance through which the few perish. To enforce and illustrate the 
conditions under which danger may impend, by reference to the 
natural process, the deviations from it, the accidents w^hich occur, 
and the manner of meeting and remedying them, is the purpose 
of scientific obstetrics. In a branch so eminently practical, the 
lessons inculcated should be simple, intelligible, readily recalled, 
and prudently applied. When to act — when to forbear; how far 
to trust Nature, and when to aid her by the resources of Art; 
w^hen to sacrifice the less to the more valuable life ; in short, all 
the complications and contingences which experience has demon- 
strated as most likely to occur, become, in turn, the subject of 
consideration and discussion. 

The course on Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pathology, 
will be divided into two parts. The first includes a description 
of the natural history, preparation and mode of exhibiting medi- 
cinal agents, with the general rules for the management of dis- 
ease; the second, the history and laws of the great pathological 
processes set up in the body and the changes they produce. The 
mere enumeration of a number, large or small, of w^ell-known or 
obscure drugs, with the safe or unsafe doses in w^hich they may 
be given, is not looked upon as the end of Materia Medica ; but 
a full history of their mode of production, properties and physio- 
logical action, with the indications governing their employment. 
It is an axiom in medicine, that "no remedy becomes such save 
by its timely use ;" to determine which, involves something 
beyond a routine knowledge of the sensible qualities of a drug, or 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 13 

the amount in which it may be borne. The principles, therefore, 
Avhich should govern the administration of remedies, are carefully 
unfolded, as the only sure guides to attaining their desired effects. 

In Pathology attention will be directed to the general principles 
governing the development of morbid actions, and the special 
characters by which the structural changes induced may be iden- 
tified The elementary forms of diseased products will be care- 
fully exhibited, with the method of distinguishing real alteration 
from that which simulates it. It is notorious that no w^ell-defined 
or reliable notions of morbid anatomy can be acquired from mere 
description, without the means of palpable and visible demonstra- 
tion. To be able to identify an hypertrophied heart, or a cancer- 
ous liver, or an inflamed lung, one must see the real thing, or a 
faithful delineation of it. In the lectures upon this subject regard 
is had to this necessity; and the parts themselves, or accurate 
representations of them, are constantly referred to. 

The University is in possession of ample means for illustrating 
the instruction given in the various departments. A full collec- 
tion of Anatomical, Surgical, Pathological and Obstetrical draw- 
ings, casts, models and preparations, with a cabinet of specimens 
in Materia Medica, and a complete chemical apparatus, are con- 
stantly in use. 

For purposes of clinical teaching it has, almost at its own doors, 
the " Baltimore Infirmary," containing a hundred and fifty beds, 
and admitting to its wards all varieties of acute and chronic dis- 
ease. This institution is under the sole charge of the Faculty. 
They can render it, therefore, literally a school of clinical medicine. 

Recognizing the necessity of attendance upon hospital practice, 
this school not only exacts but furnishes it. During the session 
clinical instruction is given by the Professors of Surgery and 
Clinical Medicine, and continued to all matriculates of the school, 
by the attending surgeons and physicians, during the remainder 
of the year without fee. The student is not only exhorted to 
attend upon clinical teaching, but the privilege being offered him 
he is expected to avail himself of it and to improve its advantages. 
No candidate for graduation can be admitted to examination until 
he has produced evidence of such attendance. 



14 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The opportunities for the study of Practical Anatomy are, it is 
beheved, unsurpassed. Anatomical material is usually abundant 
and supplied at a moderate expense. The rooms are open early 
in October, and dissection may be carried on in the evening as 
well as during the day; the roonas being lighted with gas. As it 
is an imperative condition for graduation, that the candidate shall 
produce evidence of attention to the study of Practical Anatomy, 
the Demonstrator endeavors to render this requisition a real ben- 
efit to the student, by devoting stated hours to instructing and 
directing him. The Faculty congratulate themselves upon the 
fact that a large proportion of their classes, not content with meet- 
ing the strict letter of the requirement, show by their re-appear- 
ance in the rooms for two, and even three years, and their diligent 
application, that they estimate fairly the importance of correct 
anatomical knowledge and the advantages for acquiring it. 

The Faculty of this school have no desire to indulge in ^' self- 
exaggeration, local or personal." They strive to do their duty 
by diligent attention to the various parts assigned them. They 
neither attempt, nor expect, to make all the young men who resort 
to their lecture rooms perfect physicians. They exact from them 
assiduous attendance, reasonable devotion to study, fair apprecia- 
tion of the subjects taught, good characters and habits. They 
allow for the difference in original capacity, means and opportu- 
nity, and apply no invariable test in withholding or bestowing 
their honors. 

They advise, and the advice is founded upon actual experience, 
that students attending public lectures should be frequently exam- 
ined; that constant attendance upon clinical practice and instruc- 
tion should be exacted ; and that industrious application to the 
study of practical anatomy should be required and enforced. 

If their wishes, with regard to the great point upon which im- 
provement in the character of the profession depends, could be 
met, no one would be sent to them with an inadequate amount of 
preliminary preparation. They do, honestly and uprightly, all 
they can to train their students in the love and pursuit of scientific 
truth ; but they are sincerely conscious how imperfectly many of 
them are prepared by previous discipline to appreciate such truth. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 15 

They earnestly urge their pupils to devote at least three years 
to preparatory study, to attend three courses of lectures, and, ^vhen 
not engaged in attendance upon lectures, to occupy themselves 
with a course of systematic reading, under the direction of some 
judicious practitioner, or in one of the private medical schools. 
A hurried education, conducted with a view of obtaining a di- 
ploma in the shortest possible time, and at the smallest possible 
expense, is of necessity incomplete and insufficient. The title, 
without the requisite amount of knowledge which it implies, 
always aggravates the errors committed, and increases, as it 
ought to increase, the responsibility of him who commits them. 

By order of the Faculty. 

W. E. A. AIKIN, Dean, 
Baltimore, January 15, 1853. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



1852-53 



Adams, George Frederick 
Ahl, David 
Aldridge, Joiin H. 
Amos, James Bussey 
Anderson, John William 
Armstrong, David Thomas 
Arrington, Benjamin F. 
Atkinson, Robert 
Baer, Edward Ridgely 
Benson, Geo. Wash'ton, M.D. 
Biscoe, William Booker 
Boon, William Henry, M.D. 
Board, Francis Harwood 
Brat tan, Lemuel Rush 
Brown, Richard Watson 
Bruffy, Joseph N. 
Buckler, Riggin 

Burdick, Isaac Day 

Bush, John C. 

Campbell, George Washington 
Carr, Benjamin Augustus 
Carr, Richard Wilson, M.D. 
Chandlee, Edwin 
Chaplain, James Stevens 
Childs, William Walter 
Clarke, George William 



PRECEPTORS. 

Prof. Chew, 
Dr. John Ahl, 
Dr. Wilkins, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. J. M. Finney, 
Dr. E. Hall, 

Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. W. Baer, 
Univ. Maryland 1852, 
Prof. Chew, 
Univ. Maryland 1850, 
Dr. S. G. Reese, 
Dr. S. J. S. Ker, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. W. C. Catlett, 
Dr. John Buckler, 
( Drs. Burdick and ) 
I Gleason, ; 
Dr. Thomas Wells, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew, 
Univ. Maryland 1852, 

Dr. S. T. Kemp, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. D. H. Gough, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

New York. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



17 



STUDENTS. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Claytor,Wm. Gluesenb'y,M.D. Univ. Maryland 1852, Maa^land. 



Covey, Edward 
Collins, George T. 

Coniegys, Henry Cornelius 

Cook, Elisha J.,M.D. 

Costin, William F. 

Crawford, Abraham Nicholas Prof. Miltenberger, 

Crosby, William Penn Dr. C. Dashiell, 



Dr. R. W. Handy, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

CDrs. Goldsborongh Kjarvland 
1 and Hardcastle, |^^^ar)iand. 

Univ. Maryland 1848, Maryland. 
Dr. H. P. C. Wilson, Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 



Curley,Jos. Hitzelberger,M.D. Univ. Maryland 1850, Maryland. 



Dalrymple, Augustine James Prof. Smith, 



Day, Edward William, 
Delashmutt, Van E. 
Denny, William 
Devere, Peter 
Dickerson, Edwin G. P 
Dixon, Basil S. 
Dorsey, Lloyd, Jr. 

Dorsey, Thornton, 



Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Lloyd Dorsey, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof Dunbar, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 



Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



Dr. Lloyd Dorsey, 

Doyle, Augustine Demetrius Drs.Doyle &McNeal, Pennsylva'a. 
Duncan, James Johnson Dr. A. S. Baldwin, Pennsylva'a. 

Duncan, Joseph L. Prof Dunbar, Maryland. 

Eareckson Roderick W.,M.D. Univ. Maryland 1848, Maryland. 

{Dr. Tread well, 7 tit i j 
Prof Dunbar.' JMaryland. 

Dr. T. E. F. Hintze, Maryland. 
Univ. Maryland 1852, Maryland. 
Dr. J. Fisher, Maryland. 



Elliott, Thomas Morgan, 

Eschbach, Joseph A. 
Field, Philip Shay, M.D. 



Fisher, Samuel Groome 

Forney, Cornelius Wirt, M.D. Univ. Maryland 1851, Maryland. 



Fulton, Henry Keerl 
George, Archibald 
Ghiselin, Jas. Thomas, M.D. 
Hammond, George 
Hammond, Thomas E. 
Hammond, William, M.D. 
Hank, J. B. P. 



Dr. R. Fulton, Maryland. 

Prof Smith, Maryland. 

Univ. Maryland 1852, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. E. W. Mobberly, Maryland. 
Univ. Maryland 1847, U. S. Army. 
Maryland. 



18 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDENTS. 

Harrow, John Washington 
Hatcher, Benjamin N. 
Hawkins, John Alexander 
Hay ward, George 
Hewitt, George Washington, 
Higgins, H. Lot 
Hitt, Willis M. 
Holmes, Lewis, 
Hopkins, John W. M. 
Hunter, John Harrison 
Hurtt, Edward Dewitt 
Hutchings, David 
Jacobs, James T. 
Johns, Montgomery, 
Johnson, Thomas Francis 
Jordan Robert Merton, M.D 
Kelly, George Bramwell 
Kennedy, Stephen D. 
Key, Robert Morris 
Kidd, William Griffith 
Kloman, William Christopher 

Lambdin, Wm. Wallace < 

Laney, Joseph Murray 
Laney, Thomas M. 
Lassell, William Henry 
Latham, J. W., M.D. 
Laveille, Uriah 
Lemen, William Martin 
Lomax, Richard Stuart 
Lynch John Stephen 
Machenheimer, Charles Page, 
Magruder, William Edward 
Marshall, John Silas 
Marsters, William Charles 
Martin, Andrew Jackson 
Martin, Hugh 



PRECEPTORS. 



RESIDEXCE. 



Prof. Smith, Virginia. 

Univ. Virginia, Virginia. 

Dr. Mechem, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. W. S. Pittinger, Pennsylva'a. 
Dr. Prescott, Virginia. 

Dr. W. W. Hitt, Indiana. 

Maryland Med. Inst., Maryland. 
Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Dr. T. D. Hurtt, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. Hen. W. Houston, Maryland. 
Maryland Med. Inst., Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Univ. Maryland 1852, Virginia. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. J. H. Briscoe, Maryland. 
Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 
Dr. E. P. Duvall, Maryland. 
Drs^ Maxwell and|j^^ ^^^^^^ 

t niney, 3 -^ 

Prof. Smith, Louisiana* 

Dr. Jas. Stewart, Pennsylva^a. 

Prof. IMiltenberger, Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Dr. G. Carmichael, Virginia. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. W. B. Magruder, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof, Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. Hays, Prof. Chew, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Delaware: 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



19 



STUDENTS. 



PRECEPTORS. 



RESIDENCE. 



Martin, William Nathan 
McKinnon, Matthew James 
McManus, Felix S. 
McMechan, William T. 
Mills, Bernard 
Mitchell, George Alfred 
Mitchell, R. Larken 
Mitchell, Thomas Edward 
Motter, Edward Smith 
Murray, William H. 
Nixon, George Washington 
Norris, Samuel J. 
Norris, William Henry 
O'Donnell, Joseph James 
O'Donovan, Charles, 
Outten, Cincinnatus 
O wings, James Henry 
Page, John W\,M.D. 
Perkins, James Alfred 
Perine, R. B. 
Pettebone, Philip, Jr. 
Phelps, Francis P., Jr. 
Phillips, Samuel 
Piper, Jackson 
Powell, John Fletcher 
Roach, Elisha James 
Robertson, Fenwick 
Robertson, Samuel H. 
Robins, E. S. C. 

Robinson, Chas. Benjamin < 

Rogers, Winston D. 

Sappington,Aug. Aloysius ■< 

Scott, Walter F. 
Seys, Henry H, 
Shields, John William 



Dr. E. S. Currey, Maryland. 
Dr. Baldwin, Pennsylva'a. 

Dr. F. R. McManus, Maryland. 
Dr. John Frissell, Virginia. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. J. W. Leach, Virginia. 
Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. Getzendanner, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 
Drs. Reese & Waland, Maryland. 
Dr. W. H. Stokes, Maryland. 
Baltimore Infirmary Maryland. 
Dr. G. W. Cowdery, Virginia. 
Dr. Worthington, Maryland. 
Univ. Maryland 1S48, N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 
Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Dr. A. S. Magruder, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. W. R. Handy, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 
Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. J. C. Robins, Pennsylva'a. 
Dr. Kinnemon, ") ^r | i 

Prof. Miltenberger, ^^ ^"^^ ^ 
Dr. W. L. Nilson, Pennsylva'a. 

Prof. Miltenberger, 3 
Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Dr. Kinnemon, Maryland 



20 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



STUDENTS. 

Sinclair, Duncan 
Smith, Nathan R. 
Snowden, Arthur W. 
Sohn, Edward Christian 
Sparrow, Lewis Griffith 
Steele, Joseph W. 
Steiner, J., M.D. 
Steinhofer, Christian 
Stevens, Edward Thomas 
Stoddard, John B. 
Streets, Samuel Wesley 
Sutton, Lewis James 
Taliaferro, Ben. 
Tarr, Charles Edward 
Taylor, George, M.D. 
Thomas, James Carey 
Thomas, Moses Shaw 
Thompson, VYm. Henry, Jr. 
Tidings, Edwin Randall 
Tingle, E. M. 
Wallace, J. Veasey 
Wallace, James Washington 
Walter, Charles 
Waters, Edmund George 
Watts, John Stealey 
Webster, Henry W., Jr., M.D. 
Weems, George Washington 
White, Alphonso Augustus 
White, Arthur 

Whittingham, E. Thos., M.D. 
Wiendahl, J. Henry 
Wise, John James 
Wood, Isaac N. 

Worrell, Frederick 



PRECEPTORS. 



{ 



Dr. A. D. McNair, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Miltenberger 
Drs.Coblentz & Scott, 
Prof. Chew, 
Bait. Alms House, 

Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. R. E. Sutton, 
Dr. W.Jones, Univ. Va. 
Prof. C. C. Cox, 
Univ. Maryland 1850, 
Prof. Thomas, 
Dr. W. Thomas, 
Prof Chew, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. J. R. Ward, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Univ. Maryland 1850, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. F. White, 
Dr. C. H. Ohr, 
Univ. Maryland 1852, 
Bait. Alms House, 
Prof Dunbar, 
Dr. E. W. Mobberly,^ 
Dr. Wroth and 1 

Prof. Miltenberger, 3 



RESIDENCE. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a, 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Louisiana. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland 



GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held March 9th, l8o2, the following 
candidates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



Edward Augustus Arnold, 
Roberts Bartholow, . 
John Wesley Beard, 
George Washington Benson, 
Charles John Borgman, 
William Davidson Burkhardt. 
Richard Wilson Carr, . 
James Pendleton Carter, . 
Joseph P. Chaney, 
William Quesenbury Clay tor 
James Crook, 

Charles T. D. Cunningham, 
Henry Watts Davis, 
Walter Brewer Dent, 
John Dickson, 
Hanson Maurer Drach, 
Augustine Walsh Emory, 
George Gibson Farnandis, 
• Philip Shay Field, 
Jenorious Kobreth Fleming, 
James Macalester Flint, 
George Willet France, 
William Frey, Jr., 
James Thomas Ghiselin, . 
Henry T. Goldsborough, 
Robert Henry Goldsmith, . 
Robert Gorman, . 
Albert Waterman Gray, 
Edward Jesse Griffith, . 
William Henry Hardey, . 
Williain Hart, 
Peter Wood Hawkins, 



RESIDENCE. 

Connecticut, 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Sweden. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

Ohio. 

Maryland. 

Indiana. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. ' 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Florida. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Louisiana. 

Maryland. 



22 



GRADUATES. 



NAMES. 

Robert Hollings worth, . 
T. Semmes Hoxton, 
James Gideon Ireland, . 
James Henry Jarrett, 
Charles Wesley Jefferson, 
Jeremiah Johnson, . 
John Benjamin Johnson, 
Robert Johnston, 
Buckler Jones, 
Jacob Henry Jones, . 
R. Merton Jordan, 
George Perregrin Knotts, . 
Nathan Smith Lincoln, . 
Asa Shinn Linthicum, 
Anthony La Fayette Manning, 
Edward Washington Marshall 
John McCleary, . 
John Hubbard Minor, 
Samuel Lee Moores, 
John Richard Muller, 
David Edvin Mumford, 
Francis Constantine Neale, 
Edward Foard Nowland, 
Thomas Boyle Owings, . 
John Carnes Price, 
Thomas William Perry Rider 
William Thomas H. Ross, 
Raymond Sylvester Seiss, . 
Andrew Jackson Smoot, 
James Soule, . 
Lewis Stonesifer, • 
Edward Elisha Stonestreet, 
Bruce Thomas, 
William Montgomery Thomas, 
Edward Thomas Whittinghara 
William Lewis Willis, 
William G. Wilson, 
William Jackson Wroth, . 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Massachuse's. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Mar.yland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Ohio. 

Pennsylvania. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Wisconsin. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



10 



FEES, STATUTES, &c. 



The next session will begin on Thursday, the 13th of Octo- 
ber, 1853, and close on the 1st of March, 1854. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, Chem- 
istry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Practice, Ob- 
stetrics, fifteen dollars each. The Ticket of Practical Anatomy is 
ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

Ten students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as clinical 
assistants. The fee is one hundred dollars per year, payable in 
advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and pay 
the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation and lec- 
ture tickets must be taken out at the commencement of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon wdiose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two courses 
of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in some other 
respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Faculty, 
on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis, of his own com- 
position, on some subject connected with medical science, or a 
clinical report of not less than six cases of disease, drawn up from 
his own observation. No thesis will be received after the time 
specified above, but by special vote of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for exam- 
ination on the various branches of Medicine tausfht in this school. 

o 

He must also produce evidence of attendance, during one session, 
on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be de- 



24 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

posited with the Treasurer, before a candidate can be admitted to 
examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a majority of 
votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the candidate may 
be re-examined, if he desire it: or he may decUne a second ex- 
amination, and assume the position of a candidate in whose case 
no decision has been made. 

A public commencement is held soon after the close of the 
examination, under authority of the Provost and Regents of the 
University, at which the degrees are conferred. No candidate will 
be excused from attendance but by special vote of the Faculty. 

8. The several Professors wull hold public examinations on the 
Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is earnestly 
recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate is 
based upon their knowledge of his general attendance and indus- 
try, character and habits, as well as upon the result of his final 
examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood, that 
while any student who has complied with the technical requisi- 
tions, viz: matriculation, attendance upon Lectures and the 
deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for examination, they 
reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the right of making 
moral as well as intellectual qualifications an element of their 
decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and pro- 
longed absence from Lectures will always be regarded as obsta- 
cles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, P. 
M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians and Medi- 
cal Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without special per- 
mission from the Professor or Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

By vote of Faculty, 

W. E. A. AIKIN, Dean. 

|I3=* The Janitor, who may he found at his house on the University grounds, icill 
direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The expenses of living 
are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country, good boarding being obtained at 
from ^3 to $4 per week. 



V^^=^^iJ^^"^ 




t:5?P) 



THE 



BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 




I Is conslanlly open for the reception and care of the sick. |^ 
The patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, r 
and nursed by the Sisters of Cliarity. An addition ha- ^ 
recently been erected, containing commodious private apart- 
ments separate from the more pubhc portion of the house. 
Persons from a distance requiring surgical treatment, or op- 
erations;, will find the Institution admirably adapted to this 
purpose. 

Board from three to te7i dollars per week, according to the 
accommodations required. 



«^^^^^^!^^S^^^^^^^^ 






I 



4"' 



FOETY-SEVENTH 



ANiUAL CIRCULAR AND CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



UNIVERSITY OF JWABYIAI^I). | 




SE:ssionxr los-O:- 



•33. 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO. 



M D C C C L I V . 



^^r^^^^^s?^' 




FORTY-SEVENTH 



ANNUAL CIRCUIAR 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 



SESSION 1854-55 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



Attendins: Lectures Session 18§3-54. 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO. 



M D C C C L I V . 



UNIVEllSITY OF MARYLAND. 

IIox. JOHN P. KENNEDY, LL.D., Provost. 

FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 
NATHAN R. S.^IITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AlKIN, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHE3IISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF 3IEDICINE 
AND CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANAT03IY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND 
PATHOLOGY. 



BERWICK B. SMITH, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

DEAN. 



PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



orncERS or infirmary. 

FELIX JEx\KINS, M. D., Resident Physician. 

Sister LUCY, Sister Superior. 

ROBERT M. JORDAN, M. D., Clinical Reporter. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 

JAMES BUSSEY AMOS, BENJAMIN ALEXANDER JAMESON, 

ROBERT ATKINSON, WILLIAM E. MAGRUDER, 

EDWARD RIDGELY BAER, M. D. JAMES EDWARD PERKINS, 

WILLIAM F. COSTIN, WILLIAM HENRY THOMPSON, Jr. 

GEORGE HAMxMOND, FREDERICK WORRELL. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAE. 

The Forty -Seventh Annual Session will begin on Monda}^, 
the 9th day of October, 1854, and end on the 1st day of March, 
1855. A general introductory to the course will be given, 
after which the reiziular lectures will commence. 

It is the design of the Faculty to give a plain and practical 
course of instruction : such as they consider best adapted to 
prepare the student for his future professional duties. Dis- 
senting entirely from the doctrine, that the whole science of 
Medicine is to be taught and learned in tlie public school, 
they feel at liberty to select such portions of it as may be best 
suited to oral teaching, and best calculated to benefit and 
improve those wlio attend upon it. Such instruction presup- 
poses a proper amount of preliminary preparation, fair ca- 
pacity for comprehending what is taught, a sincere desire to 
profit by the opportunities oifered, some intrinsic love of 
knowledge, and industry and application in its pursuit. It 
involves, on the part of the teacher, diligent devotion to the 
duties of his position, honest effort to display the truth accu- 
rately and intelligibly, w^ise discrimination in the choice of 
subjects for investigation, and due care that his instructions 
are presented in an attractive form. On the j^art of the stu- 
dent, active appreciation of what is taught, a clear perception 
of its relations to his future occupation, earnest determination 
to enlarge and extend his knowledge, and a sincere conviction 
that its quantity and quality Avill depend, in a great degree, 
upon the amount of personal exertion lie may bestow, and 
the energy he may exercise in availing himself of the means 
at his command. The extremest exactions of the most ardent 
reformer of " the standard of Medical Education," will fail 
in stimulating the indolent, training the inefiicient, and in- 
structing the ignorant, unless there exist some innate con- 
sciousness that the labor of acquiring, as well as of imparting, 
knowledge, is to be performed ; and that the process and pur- 
pose of education are not merely the routine repetition of a 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

series of doctrines and dogmas and passive reception of tliem, 
but a regular, methodical, continued exercise of the mental 
faculties ; so that they may be brought into right relation to 
scientific truth, and be rightly directed to discover, under- 
stand and apply it. The how to learn, what to learn, and 
how to use that which is learned, are the main points. Ab- 
stract theories of education, however rigid they may profess 
to be in testing the qualifications of the fit and rejecting the 
iinfit, will efi'ect little real good if the student is left to sup- 
pose, that every thing is to be done for him, and he is to do 
nothing for himself: that the discipline, through which he 
finds entrance to a liberal profession, is not to be a discipline 
of true mental development, but one of mere intellectual 
accumulation ; extensive acquisition of the technicalities of 
science without any real conception of the great laws and 
principles from vrhich all science springs. 

The chief value of j)ublic instruction consists in its ability 
to supply those means for acquiring professional knowledge 
not usually obtainable in a course of private study. 

It w^ould be a mistaken estimate of its design to assume 
that it is to accomplish a complete professional education, or 
that it is to be held responsible for the condition, or position, 
of all those who constitute the Medical i:>rofession. It does 
not profess to do this. It offers to tlie student certain aids in 
effecting a specific end. It affords him certain facilities for 
learning those things which it is essential that he should 
learn, and which he would not otherwise be likely to learn 
so thoroughly or so well. Its benefit will be proportioned to 
the degree of preparation, natural adaptation, industry, and 
desire for improvement he may possess. 

The object of professional education being to prepare the 
student for his duties as a practitioner, it follows, that public 
instruction should be regardful of this in all that it attempts 
to teach. It should insist, that some knowledge'of those parts 
of medical science which are indispensably essential should 
be acquired before the responsibilities of professional life are 
encountered; and with this exaction it should furnish the 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

means of meeting it. Of these essentials, a knowledge of the 
structure of the body, and of the diseases to whidi it is liable, 
stands at the head. Hence the school should be able to teach 
anatomy and the observation of disease practically. Anat- 
omy, because no where else, and at no other time, will the 
student be likely to learn it. Clinical observation of disease, 
because under no circumstances can it be so favorably pur- 
sued. From clinical instruction alone, can the student learn, 
what he must learn sooner or later, viz : the ti'ue relation of 
Nature and Art. Only in the presence of real disease can 
he begin to understand tlie value of a just conception of the 
power of remedies, and the rules which should govern their 
employment. The crude notion that the art which professes 
to treat all disease, is able to cure all disease, soon vanishes 
under the lessons of the clinical ward. There he is taught, 
that ^' the Physician is the Minister and Interpreter of Na- 
ture ; let him do or contrive what he will, unless he follows 
Nature he cannot govern her.'' 

In these two main elements of public teaching the Faculty 
of this school believe that they need not fear comparison with 
similar institutions in any part of the country. For clinical 
purposes they can control completely the hos^Dital attached to 
the school, its management being in their own hands, inde- 
pendent of all direction or supervision. Created for the use 
of the University, and sustained by it^ it is available for all 
that can be designed or desired in the way of practical in- 
struction irt Medicine or Surgery. In the immediate vicinity 
of the college, attendance upon it is convenient, and its wards 
are always accessible. From information recently obtained 
it is believed, also, that abundance and cheaj^ness of anatom- 
ical material are no where more constant conditions than in 
their rooms ; certainly not in any more northern city. 

The regular course of instruction embraces the Principles 
and Practice of Surgery, Chemistry and Pharmacy, the Prin- 
ciples and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Anat- 
omy and Physiology, Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women 
and Children, Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and Pathology. 



8 ' ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The Surgical course comprises daily lectures on the prin- 
ciples of Surgery and Clinical instruction. In the lecture 
room the principle is enforced ; in the clinical ward it is 
illustrated. Those parts of the subject most interesting to 
the practitioner are selected and carefully explained. It is 
not thought necessary or expedient to startle the student 
with the details of extraordinary operations, or to weary him 
with the complexities of rare forms of surgical disease, or to 
embarrass him with the dread of encountering the most dif- 
ficult emergencies of the art. He is taught, plainly and in- 
telligibly, principles and their application. The manage- 
ment, for example, of those accidents and diseases which are 
of most frequent occurrence ; the employment of those means 
which are simplest in their application and most easily 
obtained ; how to act on the occasions which he will be most 
liable to be called upon to meet. Surgical instruction has 
sometimes been charged with exaggerating the difficulties of 
the art, and disheartening the student by a formidable array 
of means requisite to overcome them ; with dwelling too much 
upon the most complicated and unfrequent cases, to the ne- 
glect of those which are simple and common ; and with undue 
appreciation of mere manual dexterity or mechanical skill. 
The self-love of the teacher may be flattered, and the wonder 
of the student excited, by the details of capital operations, 
and an exhibition of the celerity and coolness with which they 
may be performed, but it is questionable whether such in- 
struction is most useful or proper. A surgical operation is, 
after all but too often a confession of the incompetency of 
the science ; it mutilates because it cannot cure. To the pa- 
tient a limb saved, even if its full use be impaired, is worth 
more than the most perfect stump that the most adroit oper- 
ator could fashion for him. Surgical practice, so far as the 
most difficult operations are concerned, generally concentrates 
itself in the hands of those who have particularly devoted 
themselves to it ; the general practitioner has usually no 
desire or opportunity to engage in it. The more common 
accidents happen indiscriminately to all ; of these, all need 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 9 

to be informed. A badly managed fracture, unreduced dis- 
location and unrecognized hernia tell their own story, and 
tell it to tlie disgrace of the surgeon who is unable to detect 
and treat them ; they are standing memorials of his ignorance 
and incompetence. So also of surgical disease : that which 
is most common is absolutely most important. The attention 
of the student, therefore, is directed, not to those things which 
are intricate, curious and rare, but to those with which he 
will have to deal in daily practice. 

The instructions in the lecture room are illustrated in the 
clinical wards. Surgical accidents and diseases are there 
exhibited as realities. The general and local management 
of disease, the expediency or necessity of an operation, how 
it may be avoided, the mode of performing it, the after treat- 
ment needful to its success, are all brought before the student 
in a form most likely to awaken his attention and impress 
his memory. He sees the application of surgical science to 
the emergencies of practice ; learns how to act under like cir- 
cumstances, and is taught to rely upon his own knowledge 
and judgment through the recollection of the cases he has 
personally observed. 

The course of Principles and Practice of Medicine and Clin- 
ical Medicine includes special lectures, and clinical visits and 
lectures at the Infirmary. The lectures are an exposition of 
the natural history of disease and its treatment. 

As the great source of truth is Nature, not Opinion, it is 
deemed useless to bestow much attention upon the unsubstan- 
tial and fanciful, though ingenious speculations, which have 
risen and fallen in the progress of medicine, even if they 
happen to be fortified by the authority of a name or a party. 
The ciiief object will be to teach what is known, not to spec- 
ulate about the unknown ; to place before the student intelli- 
gible precepts for identifying disease, its difierences and re- 
semblances ; to enable him to recognize its beginning, under- 
stand its progress, anticipate its event, and the influences 
which tend to produce or arrest it ; appealing, for information 
and illustration of the truth of v/hat is taught, to tlie cases 



10 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

which are daily witnessed in the hospital wards. Modern 
medicine differs from that which has preceded it mainly in 
this : that while it esteems at their full value the powers of 
Art, it also regards, and wisely regards, the poAvers of Na- 
ture ; teaching the true wisdom of watching patiently, observ- 
ing carefully, acting cautiously; so that the operations of 
Nature being clearly understood, the ministrations of Art 
may be judiciously, efficiently, and beneficially applied. 

In Chemistry, attention is devoted primarily to teaching 
the elementary principles of chemical science, without a 
thorough comprehension of which no one can hope to advance 
into its more intricate portions with any assurance of satis- 
faction or success. The rules of chemical nomenclature, the 
phenomena and laws of caloric, light and electricity, the 
properties of simples and compounds, are displayed in their 
most intelligible aspects, with the avowed aim of thus placing 
at the student's disposal the formulse by which, according to 
his industry and inclination, he may solve the more difficult 
problems with which Chemistry abounds. 

The student may not, as he is not expected to, become an 
expert manipulator or a perfect analyst, but he can, with a 
reasonable amount of diligence and attention, possess himself 
of the cardinal truths which lie at its foundation, and deter- 
mine all its results ; understanding which, he may extend his 
knowledge almost infinitely, but ignorant of which he cannot 
safely or intelligently advance a single step. Hence he is 
first taught, as he requires first to know, the elements of the 
science and their connection with the various sub-divisions 
into which it is broken up. He is required to begin at the 
beginning, because in no other way can he be properly con- 
ducted to the end. It would be better, indeed, were he to 
enter upon his professional studies with some i)revious knowl- 
edge of the subject ; his labor would be lessened and his prog- 
ress more rapidly advanced. Such is not generally the case ; 
the necessities of the majority must, therefore, be consulted, 
and for them a clear elucidation of its elementary truths is 
certainly the object to be aimed at and accomplished. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. U 

In Anatomy and Physiology the method pursued is practi- 
cal and demonstrative. The ohject is to teach Anatomy in 
such a way that its primitive truths being perfectly acquired, 
the student may enlarge and confirm his knowledge by prac- 
tical dissection and private study. No one can expect to be- 
come an accomplished anatomist or skillful surgeon merely 
by listening to a coursCj or to many courses, of abstract or 
demonstrative lectures, however elaborate or minute. As 
well might an artisan attempt to construct a steam engine, 
or a watch, solely by his knowledge of the laws of physics. 
Demonstrative exposition must be accompanied by practical 
examination. While, then, every effort is made to exhibit 
truthfully the position, form, relations, structure and uses of 
the organs, it is insisted, that the most profitable knowledge 
of them must be acquired, nnder proper guidance, by the 
student for himself and of himself; and that, however much 
may be taught and shown in the lecture hall, practical study 
in the dissecting room is indispensable and essential. Theo- 
retical Anatomy cannot stand one in much stead in the exi- 
gencies of practice. There must be personal familiarity with 
the mode of displaying the parts and the order in which they 
present themselves. The pupil must use his hands as well as 
his head. Of all subjects in medicine, Anatomy is the last 
in whicli useful and available knowledge can be gained from 
books alone. It may happen, indeed, that of much that is 
taught and learned, but a small portion will ever be required 
in the ordinary duties of practice, but the knowledge of that 
little must be thorough and practical. The anatom}'- of the 
great cavities, of the articulations, of the blood-vessels, and 
the relations of parts, are points which the practitioner will 
ever need to know and should know. Much of wliat lie learns 
of the more intricate portions of the science will soo!i fade 
from his memory : the rest will remain, because he will have 
constant occasion to refer to and use it. So also of Pliysi- 
ology — its most valual)le truths are those which arc most 
general in their application ; its most appropriate knowledge 
is practical, not speculative, and the surest foundation for an 



12 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

extended acquaintance witli it is a correct compreliension of 
its primitive and best established laws. No attempt is made, 
therefore, to exhaust all the details of the subject, but simply 
to bring before the student those parts of it which he can 
most readily comprehend and apply. His knowledge must 
be of things— not words. It was a saying of Harvey that 
"" without experience, not other men's, but his own, no man 
is a proper disciple of any part of natural knowledge ; with- 
out experimental skill in anatomy he no better apprehends 
its truths than the man born blind can judge of the nature 
and difference of colors, or one born deaf of sounds." 

To the department of Obstetrics also belongs the consider- 
ation of diseases of Women and Children. Obstetrics having 
made great progress of late years, has at length assumed its 
proper rank as an important division of scientific medicine. 
Eeferring chiefly to a process which, in the majority of in- 
stances, is naturally and healthfully conducted to a favorable 
termination, it also includes those more complicated condi- 
tions which demand so much self-reliance and skill in the 
professional attendant. The surgeon often saves life by his 
coolness, dexterity and capacity; the obstetrician is called upon 
to perform the same office, not for one life but for two, and 
at a time when life is most desired and death most dreaded. 
That the many escape is no excuse for the ignorance through 
which the few perish. To enforce and illustrate the condi- 
tions under which danger may impend, by reference to the 
natural process, the deviations from it, the accidents which 
occur, and the manner of meeting and remedying them, is 
the purpose of scientific obstetrics. In a branch so eminently 
practical, the lessons inculcated should be simple, intelligi- 
ble, readily recalled, and prudently applied. "When to act — 
when to forbear ; how far to trust Nature, and when to aid 
her by the resources of Art ; when to sacrifice the less to the 
more valuable life ; in short, all the complications and con- 
tingencies which experience has demonstrated as most likely 
to occur, become, in turn, the subject of consideration and 
discussion. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 13 

The course on Materia Medica^ Therapeutics and Pathol- 
ogy, TN'ill be divided into two parts. The first includes a 
description of the natural history, preparation and mode of 
exhibiting medicinal agents, with the general rules for eth 
management of disease ; the second, the history and laws of 
the great pathological processes set up in the body and the 
changes they produce. The mere enumeration of a number, 
large or small, of well-known or obscure drugs, with the safe 
or unsafe doses in which they may be given, is not looked 
upon as the end of Materia Medica ; but a full history of their 
mode of production, properties and pliysiological action, with 
the indications governing their employment. It is an axiom 
in medicine, that '^ no remedy becomes such save by its timely 
use ; " to determine which, involves something beyond a 
routine knowledge of the sensible qualities of a drug, or the 
amount in which it may be borne. The principles, therefore, 
which should govern the administration of remedies, are 
carefully unfolded, as the only sure guides to attaining their 
desired effects. 

In Pathology attention will be directed to the general 
principles governing the development of morbid actions, and 
the special characters by which the structural changes in- 
duced may be identified. The elementary forms of diseased 
products will be carefully exhibited, with the method of dis- 
tinguishing real alteration from that which simulates it. It 
is notorious that no well-defined or reliable notions of morbid 
anatomy can be acquired from mere description, without the 
means of palpable and visible demonstration. To be able to 
identify an hypertrophied heart, or a cancerous liver, or an 
inflamed luno^, one must see the real thins:, or a faithful de- 
lineation of it* In the lectures upon this subject regard is 
had to this necessity ; and the parts themselves, or accurate 
representations of them, are constantly referred to. 

The University is in possession of ample means for illus- 
trating the instruction given in the various departraerts. A 
full collection of Anatomical, Surgical, Pathological and 
Obstetrical drawings, casts, models and preparations, with a 



14 ^ ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

cabinet of specimens in Materia Medica, and a complete chem- 
ical apparatus, are constantly in use. 

For purposes of clinical teaching it has, almost at its own 
doors, the '^ Baltimore Infirmary," containing a hundred and 
fifty beds, and admitting to its wards all varieties of acute 
and chronic disease. This institution is under the sole charge 
of the Faculty. They can render it, therefore, literally a 
school of clinical medicine. 

Recognizing the necessity of attendance upon hospital 
practice, this school not only exacts but furnishes it. Dur- 
ing the session clinical instruction is given by the Professors 
of Surgery and Clinical Medicine, and continued to all ma- 
triculates of the school, by the attending surgeons and physi- 
cians, during the remainder of the year without fee. The 
student is not only exhorted to attend upon clinical teaching, 
but the privilege being offered him he is expected to avail 
himself of it and to improve its advantages. jSTo candidate 
for graduation can be admitted to examination until he has 
produced evidence of such attendance. 

The opportunities for the study of Practical Anatomy are, 
it is believed, unsurpassed. Anatomical material is usually 
abundant and supplied at a moderate expense. The rooms 
are open early in October, and dissection may be carried on 
in the evening as well as during the day ; the rooms being 
lighted with gas. As it is an imperative condition for grad- 
uation, that the candidate shall produce evidence of attention 
to the study of Practical Anatomy, the Demonstrator endeav- 
ors to render this requisition a real benefit to the student, by 
devoting stated hours to instructing and directing him. The 
Faculty congratulate themselves upon the fact that a large 
proportion of their classes, not content with meeting the 
strict letter of the requirement, show by their re-appearance 
in the rooms for two, and even three years, and their diligent 
application, that they estimate fairly the importance of correct 
anatomical knowledge and the advantages for acquiring it. 

The Faculty of this school have no desire to indulge in 
" self-exaggeration, local or personal." They strive to do 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 15 

their duty by diligent attention to the various parts assigned 
them. They neither attempt, nor expect, to make all the 
young men who resort to their lecture rooms perfect physi- 
cians. They exact from them assiduoi^s attendance, reasona- 
ble devotion to study, fair appreciation of the subjects taught, 
good characters and habits. They allow for the difference in 
original cai3acity, means and opportunity, and apply no in- 
variable test in withholding or bestowing their honors. 

They advise, and the advice is founded upon actual experi- 
ence, that students attending public lectures should be fre- 
quently examined; that constant attendance upon clinical 
practice and instruction should be exacted ; and that indus- 
trious application to the study of practical anatomy should 
be required and enforced. 

If their wishes, with regard to the great point upon which 
improvement in the character of the profession depends, could 
be met, no one would be sent to them with an inadequate 
amount of preliminary preparation.. They do, honestly and 
uprightly, all they can to train their students in the love 
and pursuit of scientific truth ; but they are sincerely con- 
scious how imperfectly many of them are prepared by pre- 
vious discipline to appreciate such truth. 

They earnestly urge their pupils to devote at least three 
years to preparatory study, to attend three courses of lectures, 
and, when not engaged in attendance upon lectures, to occu- 
py themselves with a course of systematic reading, under the 
direction of some judicious practitioner, or in one of the pri- 
vate medical schools. A hurried education, conducted with 
a view of obtaining a diploma in the shortest possible time, 
and at the smallest possible expense, is of necessity incom- 
plete and insufficient. The title, without tlie requisite 
amount of knowledge which it implies, always aggravates 
the errors committed, and increases, as it ought to increase, 
the responsibility of him who commits them. 
By order of the Faculty, 

W. E. A. AIKIN, Dean, 

Baltimore, January 15, 1854. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



18 5 3-54. 



Aldridge, John H. 
Amos, James Bussey 
Anderson, John William 
Ashlin, Charles A. 

Atkinson, Robert 

Bishop, Elijah Tracy 
Bishop, H. F. 
Blount, Joseph E. 
Board, Francis Harwood 
Boarman, William J. 
Brattan, Lemuel Rush 
Brent, Henry W. 
Brewer, Charles 

Briscoe, Henry 

Brock, Jesse Wyandotte 

Bruce, William H. 
Buckley, J. James 
Buffington, John F. 
Burgess, John J. 

Bush, John C. 

Chaplain, James Stevens 

Chatard, Silas Marean 
Chew, Henry B. 
Childs, William Walter 
Clarke, G. W. 



Bait. Infirmary, 
Dr. Dunbar, 



PRECEPTORS. 

Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. J. M. Finney, 
Starlino- Med. Coll. 

:"■'! 

Dr. Bishop, 
Dr. J. A. Bates, 
Prof Smith, 
Dr. S. G. Reese, 
Dr. Walt. F. Boarman, 
Dr. S. J. S. Ker, 
Prof Miltenberger, 
Prof Smith, 
Prof Chew and 
Dr. J. Waring. 
{ Dr. J.Bracken & ) 
I Prof Chew, I 

Prof Smith, 
Dr. R. E. Brumwell, 
Dr. J. Swope, 
Prof Smith, 
^ Dr. Thos. Wells & > 
I Prof Miltenberger, ) 
( Prof Miltenberger 
I & Dr.S.T. Kemp, 
Md. Med. Institute, 
Dr. G. M. Bosley, 
Prof Chew, 



EESIDENCB. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Ohio. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Massachus't. 

N. Carolina. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Ohio. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland, 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



17 



Clawson, James Emory 
Collins, George T. 
Comeg'3's, Henry Cornelius 
Costin, William F. 
Covey, Edward N. 
Curtis, Humphrey H. Jr. 
Dalrymple, Augustin J. 
Daniel, Spencer 
Delashmutt, Van E. 
Devere, Peter 



Prof. Roberts, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof W. R. Handy, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. A. J. Askew, 
Dr. Lloyd Dorsey, 
Prof Dunbar, 
Dickenson, Edwin Geo. Parker Prof Miltenberger, 



Dixon, Basil S. 
Dorsey, J. Thomas 
Dorsey, Lloyd Jr. 
Dorsey, Robert W. 
Doyle, Augustin Demetrius 
Duncan, James Johnston 
Eschbach, Joseph A. 
Espine, Raphael 
Faunt Le Roy, Robert B. 
Ferguson, David C. 
Ferguson, Oscar A., M. D. 
Fisher, Samuel Groome 
t ulton, Henry Keerl 
Gantt, Walter Chandler 
Gibson, George S. 
Glacken, Joseph 
Greentree, Hiram 
Gunby, H. H. 
George, Archibald 
Hammond, George 
Hammontree, John S. 
Hank, James Bernard Peale 
Hay, Jacob Jr. 
Healy, James E. 
Hebb, Thomas W., M. D. 
Hendnx, Henry A. 
Hering, Edw in A. 



Prof Chew, 
Md. Med. Institute, 
Dr. Lloyd Dorsey, 
Md. Med. Institute, 
Drs. Doyle &McNeal, 
Dr. A. S. Baldwin, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Dr. Cherbonnier, 
Univ. of Virginia, 
Dr. J. R. Hendricks, 
Univ. Md., 1849, 
Md. Med. Institute, 
Dr. Robert Fulton, 
Rev. S. Ridout, M. D. 
Md. Med, Institute, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Brewer, 
Prof Chew, 
Prof. Smith, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. A. S. Kunkle, 
Dr. J. W. F. Hank, 
Di s. Jac. & Jno. Hay, 
Prof Smith, 
Nat. Med. Coll., 1853, 
Dr. J. Gerry, 
Dr. Sid well. 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryiaud 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Maryland. 

Cuba. 

Virginia. 

Virsrinia. 

o 

Mayland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

jMaryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mainland. 

Ohio. 

Mar-yland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Maryland. 

^Maryland. 

Indiana. 

Maryland* 



18 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



Hering, Joshua Webster Dr. Mathias, Maryland. 

Hewitt, George Washington | j^^^.^.^^ MTchael" \ Pensylvan'a. 

Holmes, Lewis Md. Med. Institute, Maryland. 

Hopkins, John W., "^I. Prof. Dr.nbar. Virginia. 

' Houston, Joseph M. Drs. Houston &Woire, Delaware. 

Hower, Jonat. Anthony Castle Dr. M. M. Garry, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

( ^™ * T'u^Z' \ Maryland. 
^ ger & Dr. Hurtt, 3 

Univ. Maryland, 1853, Maryland. 

Dr.H.W. Houston, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 



Hunter, John Harrison 

Hurtt, Edgar Dewitt 

Hutchings, David, M. D. 
Jacobs, Jan.es T. 
Jameson, Benjamin Alexander 
Johnson, A. J. 
Johnson, William H., M. D. 
Jordan, R. M., M. D. 
Kennedy, Booth 
Kennedy, Stephen Dandridge 
Key, Robert Morris 
Kloman, William Christopher 
Lambdin, William Wallace 
Late, William M. 

Latimer, Matthias R. 

Lemen, William Martin 
Lewis, Granville R. 



Dr. Clendinen, Maryland. 

Univ. Maryland, 1849, Virginia. 
Univ. Maryland, 1852, Virginia. 
Dr. F. D. Mitchell, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. J. H. Briscoe, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. J. M. Finney Maryland. 

Dr. W. Dunkin, Virginia. 

Miltenber- ] 
J. H. 



CProf. Milt 

< ger & Dr. 

^ Bayne, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. Z. Lewis, 

C Prof 



Lewis, John W. 

Linthicum, Hezekiah 
Lloyd, Francis M. 
Lomax, Richard Stuart 
Lowndes, Charles 
Lynch, Jethro 
Mace, Carville V. 
Magruder, William Edward 
Marshall, John S., M. D. 
McCullough, John K. 



ger 
Askew 



: MiltenberO 
& Dr. A. J. > 

3W, ) 



Maryland. 

Virginia. 
Virginia. 



N. Carolina. 



Maryland. 
Marvland. 



Dr. Wilson, 

Dr. Kemp, 

Dr. J.F Carmichael, 

Prof Miltenberger, 

Prof Monkur, 

Drs. Mace & Large, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Univ. Maryland, 1853, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 



Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



19 



McLane, Moses 
McManus, Felix S. 
McMechen, William T. 
McSherry, James Whann 
Mills, Bernard, M. D. 
Mitchell, Richard Tasker 

Motter, Edward Smith 

Murray, William H. 
Neal, Anselm Washington 

Norris, Samuel J. 

O'Donnel Joseph James 

O'Donnoghue, Florence 
Outten, Cincinnatus 

Ovvings, James Henry 

Perkins, James Alfred 
Perrie, Richard B. 

Perry, H. F. 

Pettebone, Philip, Jr.' 
Philips, Sa'Tiuel, M, D. 
Powell, John William 
Purnell, James B. R., M. D. 



Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 



Prof. Dunbar, 

Dr. F. R. McManus 

Dr. John Tripell, 

Prof. Dunbar, Virginia 

Univ. Maryland, 1853, Maryland 

Dr. J. W. Leach, 
C Prof. Piggott, & 1 
\ Dr.Getzendanner y 

Prof Smith, 

Prof. Cox, 
C Drs. W. Norris ") 
( and Dunbar, y 

C Dr. W. H. Stokes ) 
^ and Prof. Milten- V 
^ berger, ) 

Prof Miltenberger, 

Dr. G. W. Cowdery, 
( Prof. Miltenber- "^ 



Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

D. Columb. 
Virginia. 



ger & Dr. T. C. > 

VVorthington, j 



Maryland. 



Baltimore Infirmary. 

Prof Smith, 
C Prof Chew, and ) 
I Dr. J. R. Ward, \ 

Prof Miltenberger, 

Univ. Maryland, 1853, Maryland. 

Md. Med. Institute, N. Carolina. 

Univ. Maryland, 1850,^ Maryland. 



Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



Richardson. Chas. Chesterfield Dr. Chas. Richardson, Maryland. 



Roach, Elisha James 
Robertson, Fenwick 


Prof Smith, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 
Maryland. 


Scott, Richard J. 


Dr. W. K. Osborn, 


Maryland. 


Slaughter, James M. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Siemens, Albert B. 
Smith, Fielder Bowie 


C rrOi\ Chew ^ 
} and Dr. C. V 

( Humphreys, ) 

( Prof. Dunbar and ji 

;; Dr. Hall, ] 


Maryland. 
Maryland. 


Smith, John Sparrow 


Prof Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Smith, Reuben 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Virginia. 



20 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



Sohn, Edward Christian 

Stanforth, Richard < 

Steele, Joseph W. 
Steinhofer, Christian 

Stewart, Ebenezer J., M. D. j 

Stockett, Charles W. 
Stoddard, John B. 
Sutton, Lewis James 
Tarr, Charles Edward 
Tate, Theodore T. 
Thomas, James Carey 
Thompson, John C. 

Thompson, Rezin Ricketts < 

Thompson, William Henry, Jr. 
Tracy, William Rufus 
Tull, Rev. J. Emory 
Weems, George Washington 
^^'hite, Arthur 

White, Silas C. 

Wiendahl. Jacob Henry 
Wise, John James 

Wood, Isaac Newton 

Worrell, Frederick 
Vandersloot, Frederick Wm. 
Vaughan, Henry, Jr. 



Prof. Miltenberger, 
Prof. Chew & Dr. ) 
Wm. Macdaniel, ) 
Bait. Alms House, 
Prof. Smith, 
Western Reserve 
College, 1853, 
Md. Med. Institute, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. R. E. Sutton, 
Profs. Chew & Cox, 
Dr. J. N. Smith, 
Prof. Thomas, 
Drs. O. and J. Crook, 
Prof Chew and ") 
Drs. Heaton and > 
Osborn, ) 

Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. Bull, 

Prof. Chew, 

Drs. Smith and Ohr, 

Dr. J. H. White ) 
& Dr. Wilson, ] 
Bait. Alms House, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Frot. Miltenber- J 
ger & Dr. E. W. V 
Mobberly, ) 

Baltimore Infirmary, 
Drs. Haller & Wilson 
Dr. Bordley, 



Pennsylva'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Massachus't. 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Maryland. 

Ohio. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Louisiana. 
Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

, Pennsylva'a. 

Mississippi. 



GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held March Sth, 1853, the following 
candidates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



RESIDENCE. 



George Frederick Adams, 
David Ahl, 

Edward Ridgely Baer, 
William Booker Biscoe, . 
Richard Watson Brown, 
Riggin Buckler, . 
Isaac Day Burdick, 
Benjamin Augustus Carr, 
Abraham Nicholas Crawford, 
Edward William Day, 
William Denny, 
Thornton Dorsey, 
Thomas Morgan Elliot^ 
John Washington Harrow, 
John Alexander Hawkins, . 
H. Lot Higgins, 
David Hutchings, 
Montgomery Johns, 
Thomas Francis Johnson, 
William Griffith Kidd, . 
Thomas M. Laney, 
William Henry Lassell, . 
Uriah Laveille, 
John Steven Lynch, 
Charles Page Machenheimer, 
John Silas Marshall, 
William Charles Masters, 
Andrew Jackson Martin, 
Hugh Martin, 
William Nathan Martin, 



Maryland. 
Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 

. Maryland. 

New York. 

. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 

. Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 

. Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Delaware. 
. Maryland. 



22 



GRADUATES. 



Matthew James McKinnon, . 

Bernard Mills, 

George Alfred Mitchell, 

Thomas Edward Mitchell, 

"William Henry Korris, 

Charles O'Donovan, 

Francis Philip Phelps, 

Samuel Philips, 

Jackson Piper, 

John Fletcher Powell, 

Samuel H. Koherston, 

Charles Benjamin Rohinson, 

Winston D. Rogers, . 

Augustine Aloysius S^ippington, 

Henry H. Seys, 

John William Shields, 

Lewis Griffith Sparrow, 

Edward Thomas Stevens, 

Samuel Wesley Streets, . ,. 

Ben. Taliaferro, . 

Moses Shaw Thomas, 

Edwin Randall Tidings, . 

Edwin McKnight Tingle, 

J. Veasey Wallace, 

James Washington Wallace, 

Charles Walter,^ 

Edmund George Waters, 

John Stealey Watts, 

Alphonso Augustus White, . 



Pennsylvania. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Mai-yland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 

. Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Virginia. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 

. Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 



y'^ 



FEES, STATUTES, &c. 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 9th of Octo- 
ber, 1854j and close on the 1st of March, 1855. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, Chem- 
istry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Practice, 
Ohstetrics, ffteen dollars each. Tlie Ticket of Practical Anat- 
omy is ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

Ten students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as 
clinical assistants. The fee is 07ie hundred dollars per year, 
payable in advance. 

STATUT3GS. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on .pr before the 14th day of February, a thesis, of 
his own composition, on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by special vote of 
the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 
school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 



24 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

deposited with the Treasurer, before a candidate can be ad- 
mitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Shouhl the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desire it ; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

A public commencement is held soon after the close of the 
examination, under authority of the Provost and Kegents of 
the University, at which the degrees are conferred. No can- 
didate will be excused from attendance but by special vote of 
the Faculty: 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the result 
of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood, 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures will always be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sunday excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 
Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. By vote of Faculty, 

W. E. A. AIKIN, Dean, 

|E3^ The Janitor^ who may he found at his house on the University grounds, will 
direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The expenses of living 
are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country, good boarding being ^obtained at 
from $3 to $4 per week. 




:;S^^^S^^^^=^g^^^^£^^^^S^^^^g:^£i 



THE 



BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 




I 



— - 



Is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. 
The patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, 
and nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has 
recently been erected, containing commodious private apart- 
ments separate from the more public portion of the house. 
Persons from a distance requiring surgical treatment, or op- 
erations, will find the Institution admirably adapted to this 
purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the 
accommodations required. 




V 




;^S^£^^;^g^.^3:^£^^^;^^^£,^> '.-^ 



FORTY -EIGHTH 




ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



I MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



I Snilieriitg 0! P^arghni, 




SESSION 1855-50 



BALTIMORE. 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOP & CO 



51 D c c c r, V 






FORTY-EIGHTH 



ANNUAL CIECULAR 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OE MARYLAND, 

SESSION 1855-56, 



CATALOGUE OE MATRICULATES, 



SES S ION 1854-55. 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 

MDCCCLV. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL.D., Provost. 

FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 
PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 
PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

F MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D. 

LECTURER ON EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ^nCROSCOPY. 



BERWICK B. SMITH, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



GEORGE W. 3IILTENBERGER, M. D. 

DEAN. 



PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

JOHN A. DOYLE, M. D Resident Physician. 

Sister LUCY IGXATIA Sister Superior. 

ROBERT ATKINSON, M. D Clinical Reporter. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 

CHARLES BREWER, CHARLES LOWNDES, 

HENRY BRISCOE, FLORENCE O'DONNOGHUE, 

HENRY A. HENDRIX, J. EMORY TULL, 

JOSEPH M. HOUSTON, REZIN RICKETTS THOMPSON, 

JOHN HARRISON HUNTER, ALBERT HARRISON DICKINSON, 

BENJAMIN ALEXANDER JAMESON, THOMAS MARTIN JORDAN. 



ANNUAL CIUCULAll. 



The forty-eightli session will begin on Monday, October 
8th, 1855, and end on the first of March, 1856. 

The Faculty, for the last three years, have abandoned the 
custom of devoting the first week of the session to a series 
of introductory lectures, from a conviction, that the time can 
be more profitabl}^ occupied by entering, at once, upon the 
real object of public instruction — the communication of 
professional knowledge. There will be, therefore, but one 
general introductory, after which the regular lectures will 
commence. 

The views of the Faculty upon the character and objects of 
medical education have been fully and frankly expressed in 
former years. They do not consider it necessary to repeat 
them. Their aim will be to teach, not all that is known, but 
such knowledge as may be best adapted for oral instruction, 
and most likely to be useful to the student in his future pro- 
fessional life. They seek and strive to make their instruc- 
tions plain and 2)ractical, requiring, on the part of the pupil, 
a proper amount of preliminary preparation, fair ca])acity 
for com2:)reh ending what is taught, a sincere desire to profit 
by the opportunities offered to liim, some intrinsic love of 
knowledge, and industry and application in its pursuit : 
promising, on their part, diligent devotion to their duties, 
and honest effort to display the truths of science accurately 
and intelligibly. Though they do not believe that a medical 
education can be begun and finislied in a public school, they 
are fully convinced that, properly prepared for it, with a true 
estimate of its 2'Ui'poses and uses, the student will find the 
training and discii)line to which he is there subjected, of in- 
finite value in guiding him to a knowledge of the principles 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

and practice of the Science and the Art to which his life is 
to be devoted. Its great object is to teach truth : but it 
cannot, never has, and never will, convert the ignorant, idle, 
incompetent and inefficient, into apt and accomplished fol- 
lowers of a liberal profession. There must be some ability 
to understand and apply what is taught : some endeavor to- 
wards active appreciation, and some recognition of the fact, 
that education, in Science or Art, cannot be reduced to a 
mere process of passive reception. The pupil must see clear- 
ly, that, whoever may be his teacher, and however attractive 
and complete may be the instructions, he can only make the 
advantages he enjoys available for the end he has in view, by 
industrious and intelligent personal effort. 'The public teacher 
and private preceptor can do much in exciting and develop- 
ing the intellectual powers of those with whom they may be 
brought into relation : the pupil himself, judiciously directed 
and rightly inclined, by careful cultivation of his mental 
faculties and assiduous attention to his duties, can do vastly 
more. The skillful craftsman becomes such not solely by the 
teachings of his master, but by his own patience, persever- 
an'ce and energy. If this be true of the practitioner of an 
Art, it can hardly be less true of the students of a Science. 

The course of instruction in the University embraces the 
Principles and Practice of Surgery, Chemistry and Pharmacy, 
the Principles and Practice of Medicine, Anatomy and Phys- 
iology, Obstetrics^ Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and Pa- 
thology, Experimental Physiology and Microscopy. 

Clinical instruction in Medicine and Surgery^ is given at 
the " Baltimore Infirmary," which contains a hundred and 
fifty beds, is in the immediate neighborhood, belongs to the 
University and is under the control and management of the 
Faculty. It was originally established, for purposes of clini- 
cal instruction^, during the connection of the late Professor 
Granville Sharpe Pattison with the University, and has been 
maintained as such over thirty years. That it has admirably 
fulfilled the designs of its founders, the Faculty have the as- 
surance of their own observation, and the testimony of the 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

numerous active members of the profession who have been 
trained within its walls. As an adjunct to the course of in- 
struction it has been, and continues to be of inestimable worth. 
Abstract teaching has its value, yet it can scarcely hope to 
reach its highest good without the aid of palpable and visible 
demonstration. A lecture on typhoid fever, or pneumonia, or 
fracture, or hernia, may contain all that is needful to be known, 
but without a direct appeal to the senses, by actual exhibition 
of the patient, this knowledge will inevitably be vague and 
imperfect. The use of clinical instruction consists in the pow- 
er it bestows of identifying disease : it presents the reality to 
be compared and contrasted with the ideal conception of it. 

The wards of the Infirmary are open to all matriculates of 
the school throughout the year. During the Session, Clin- 
ical lectures are given four times a week, in Medicine and 
Surgery, and the student is at liberty to attend the daily 
visits of the Pliysician and Surgeon. 

The opportunities for studying practical anatomy are am- 
ple. Material is usually abundant and supplied at moderate 
expense. The rooms are opened early in October, and, being 
lighted by gas, dissections may be carried on at night. The 
Faculty require of all candidates for graduation evidence of 
attendance on clinical instruction and practical anatomy, 
because they believe, that no one ought to be permitted to 
treat the living who has not observed the diseases of the liv- 
ing and learned something of the structure of the human 
body. It was a saying of Harvey, that '^without experience, 
not other men's but his own^ no man is a disciple of any part 
of natural knowledge ; without experimental skill in anat- 
omy, he no better apprehends its truths than a man born 
blind can judge of the nature and difference of colors, or one 
born deaf of sounds." 

Since the last session the Faculty have created a new de- 
partment, which they are convinced will prove attractive and 
useful — the Lectureship on ^'Experimental Physiology and 
Microscopy." The gentleman who has been placed in charge 
of these branches has been long and well known as a most 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

accom2)lished Physiologist and Microscopist. An alumnus 
of the school, he will bring to it the results of experience, 
skill, industry and zeal. A- residence of several years 
abroad having yielded to him extraordinary facilities for 
becoming perfectly familiar with the discoveries and doc- 
trines of modern Physiology, possessing a great natural apti- 
tude for the acquirement and communication of the knowl- 
edge it will be his duty to teach, the Faculty confidently an- 
ticipate, that their classes will find in his instructions much, 
not merely of novelty and interest, but of absolute utility ; 
much, indeed, which, in the present progressive condition of 
medical science, it becomes every educated physician to know. 

The ''University of Maryland" has nearly reached the first 
half century of its existence, and is, it is believed, the fourth 
oldest school in the United States. Its alumni are distributed 
over the whole South and West. Many of them have entered 
the public service.* 

The Faculty congratulate them upon the present prosperi- 
ty of their alma mater ^ and trust that in their hands the honor 
and usefulness of the trust committed to them may suffer no 
diminution. 

By order of the Faculty, 

G. W. MILTENBERGER, Dean, 

Baltimore, January 25, 1855. 

*At the last examination (1853) of candidates for admission into the medical 
department of the "United States Army," four gentlemen from the "University 
of Maryland, ' ■ one of them an under-graduate, presented themselves. They were 
all accepted. 



I 



CATALOGUE OF M A TKICUL A TES. 



SESSION 1854-55. 



NAMES. 

Aldridge, John H. 
Atkinson, Edwin Eagle 
Atkinson, Robert, M. D., 
Baden, Joseph Abell 
Barber, Philip D, 
Bennett, J. Edmond 
Benson, George W. 
Best, William Janney 
Betts, Solomon, Jr., 
Billingslea, Uriah H. 
Birch, Andrew D. 
Bishop, Elijah Tracie 
Boarman, William J. 
Bowlen, George W. 
Brent, Henry Waring 
Brewer, Charles 
Brewer, G. G. 
Briscoe, Henry 

Brock, Jesse Wyandotte 

Brooke, Alexander Mortimer 
Bruce, William H. 

Buckley, Jesse J. 

Burke, H. R. 

Carson, W^illiam Cowan 

Chatard, Silas Marean 



PRECEPTORS. 



Prof. Smith, 

Dr. J. A. Hotton, 

Univ. Maryland 1854, 

Dr. W. Sands, 

Prof. Chew, 

Prof. Smith, 

Univ. Maryland 1850, 

Dr, Janney, 

Dr. Newman, 

Dr. Billingslea, 

Dr. Bishop, Pf. Smith, 

Prof. Miltenberger, 

Drs. Eaton &Baldwin, 

Prof. Miltenberger, 

Dr. A. Claude, 

Dr. Brewer, 

Pf. Chew, Dr. Waren, 

Dr. J. Bracken, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Smoot, 

Prof. Miltenberger, 

Prof Smith, 

Dr. Bromwell, 

Prof Smith, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Rowland, 
Md. Med. Institute, 



] 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Ohio. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Louisiana. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



10 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMES. 

Clagett, Benjamin Franklin 
Clarke, G. W. 
Clawson, James Emory 
Cole, Merry man, Jr., 
Conner, George J. 
Covey, Edward N. 
Cowles, Joseph Loyal 
Cronmiller, John, Jr., 
Crook, James 
Dalrymple, Augustin J. 
Daniel, Spencer 
Davis, Francis M'Cauley 
Dawson, William Hambleton, 
Dickinson, Albert Harrison 
Dorsey, Lloyd, Jr., M. D., 
Dorsey, Robert W. 
Downing, Stratton B. 
Duke, James J. 
Duncan, Joseph L. 
Edmonds, Henry Jeter 
Espin, Jose Raphael 
Everhart, Oliver Troxel 
Fisher, Samuel Groome, M.D. 

Ferguson, David Campbell < 

Garrott, Erasmus 
Gibson, George 
Glacken, Joseph 
Glenn, William Ellis 
Gorgas, Ferdinand J. S. 
Greentree, Hiram 
Gunby, Hiram Henry 
Hall, John Edward 

Hamilton, Alexander Duvall^ 

Hammontree, John Samuel 
Harris, Morgan 



PRECEPTORS. 



Dr. G. Clagett. 



RESIDENCE. 



Pennsylva'a. 
Maryland; 
Georgia. 
Maryland. 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Bait. "Med. Institute, Maryland. 
Dr. M. Cole, Jr., Maryland. 
Dr. G. Z. Bretz, 
Dr. W. R. Handy, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. J. Cronmiller, 
Univ. Maryland 1852, Ohio. 
Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 
Prof. Miltenberger, N. Carolina. 
Dr. Grimes, Maryland. 

Dr. J. Dawson, Maryland. 

Dr. S. J. Dickinson, Maryland. 
Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 
Md. Med. Institute, Maryland. 
Dr. A. W. Downing, Virginia. 
Pf. Chew, Dr. Dorsey, Maryland. 
Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

University Virginia, Virginia. 
Dr. Cherbonnier, Cuba. 

Dr. H. E. Beltz, Maryland. 

Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Dr. } ^j. . . 

Hendricks, \ ^^^S^"^^' 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. Donaldson, Maryland. 

Pf.Smith,Dr.Rowland,Maryland. 
Pf.Dunbar,Dr.Leeper, Ireland. 
Dr. Bretz, Pennsylva'a. 

Dr. Brewer, Maryland. 

Pf. Chew, Dr. Morris, Maryland. 
Dr. J. Crane, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, 
Dr. Clayton, 



Maryland. 



Dr. Kunkle, 

Dr. J. H. Reeder, 



Ohio. 
Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



11 



XAMES. PRECEPTORS. 

Hay, Jacob 

Healy, James E. 

Hellen, William D. 

Hendrix, Henry A. 

Hering, Edwin Augustus 

Hering, Joshua Webster 

Hodges, William E. 

Hodson, Eugene 

Holmes, Lewis 

Hoof, Edward Lee 

Hopkins, John W. M. 

Houston, Joseph M. 

Humes, George Washington 

Hunter, John Harrison 

Iddings, C. Edward 

Iglehart, David Thomas 

Ireland, John Fielder 

Jacobs, James T. 

Jameson, Benjamin Alexander 

Jennings, N. Hynson 

Johnson, Andrew Jackson 

Johnson, John Dice 

Jordan, Thomas Martin 

Jordan, Robert Merton, M.D., 

Keech, Thomas A. R. 

Kemp, John Dodson 

Kennedy, Booth 

Kennedy, Stephen Dandridge 

Key, Robert Morris, M.D., 

Kilpatrick, James W. 

Kloman, William Christopher 

Koechling, Charles W. 

Lambdin,Wm. Wallace, M.D., 

Laney, William Housel 

Latimer, Matthias Randolph 

Lemen, William Martin Prof. Dunbar, 



Prof. Chew, Pennsylva'a. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Pr. Chew, Dr. Sedwick, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Pennsylva'a, 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 

Dr. Jacob, Maryland. 

Dr. E. F. Smithers, Maryland. 

Md. Med. Institute, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Delaware. 

Dr. Landis, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Virginia. 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 

Dr. W. H. Handy, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. H. W. Houston, Maryland. 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Dr. J. P. Polk, Maryland. 

Dr. W. H.Clendenin, Maryland. 
Dr. R. B. Dice, Virginia. 

Dr. J. L. Free, Pennsylva'a. 

Univ. Maryland 1852, Virginia. 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. Crook, Prof. Smith, Ohio. 
Pf.CheWjDr.Mitchell, Maryland. 
Prof Smith, Maryland. 

Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 

* N. Carolina. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Smith, Maryland. . 

Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 
Prof. Dunbar, JNIaryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 
Virginia. 



12 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMES. 

Linthicum, Hezekiah 



PRECEPTORS. 



RESIDENCE. 



Lloyd, Francis Mar 



'1011 



Lomax, Richard Stewart < 

Lowndes, Charles 
Lynch, Jethro 
Maccubbin, John 
Mace, Carville V. 
Macgill, Charles G. W. 
Massengale, Benjamin A. H. 
McCauley, Lawrence 
McCulloh, John K. 
McDowell, James H. 
McGary, Peter J. 
McGee, Thomas C. 
McLane, Moses 
McLeod, A. H. 
McManus, Felix Shulze 

McSherry, James Whann ■< 

Mitchell, R. Tasker, M.D., 
Moore, Reuben H» 
Mudd, James Marcellus 
Mudd, Samuel A. 
Murray, Wm. Henry, M.D., 
Neal, Anselm Washington 
Nickerson, Charles Edward 
Norfolk, William Henry 
O'Donnoghue, Florence 
Outten, Cincinnatus 
Percival, Charles, M.D., 
Perrie, Richard B. 
Perry, Heman Felton 
Pettebone, Philip, M.D., 
Richardson, Chs. Chesterfield, 
Roach, Elisha James 



Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenbers^er, ") at i i 
Dr. Kemp, ^ jMaryland. 

Prof. Chew, Dr. 7 ^,. . . 
Carmichael jVirgima. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 

Dr. Monkur, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Drs. Mace and Large, Maryland. 

Dr. C. Macgill, Maryland. 

Dr. Lyles, Mississippi. 

Dr. D. A. O'Donnell, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. C. Macgill, Virginia. 

Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Dr. G. C. M. Roberts, Maryland. 

Dr. F. R. McManus, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, ") it- • • 

Dr. McSherr;, | Virginia. 

Univ. Maryland 1854, Virginia. 
Prof. Dunbai, Maryland. 

Dr. Mudd, Maryland. 

Dr. Mudd, Maryland. 

Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 
Prof. Chew, Dr. Cox, Maryland. 
Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Pf. Dunbar, Dr. Bird, Maryland. 
Baltimore Infirraarv, Dist. of Col, 
Dr. Cowdery, Virginia. 

Univ. Pennsyl'a 1846, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Dr. Ward, New York. 
Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 
Dr. Richardson, Maryland. 

Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland, 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



13 



Rogers, Henry Clay 

Roman, Philip F. 

Sappington, A. S. 

Scarboro, Silas 

Scheldt, Otho F. 

Scott, Richard John 

Scott, Rufus 

Scott, Walter 

Shower, Theodore A. 

Sinclair, Duncan 

Slaughter, James Mackson 

Siemens, Albert Brown 

Smith, James 

Smith, John Sparrow 

Smith, Nathan R., Jr., 

Smith, Fielder Bowie 

Smith, Reuben 

Snowden, Arthur M. 

Stanforth, Richard 

Steele, Joseph Wesley 

Steele, Thomas B., M.D., 

Steinhofer, Christian, M.D., 

Stockett, Charles W. 

Stonebraker, Abraham S. 

Taylor, John Bailey 

Thomas, Philip Francis, Jr., 

Thompson, John Christopher Dr. Crook, Pf. Smith, 

Thompson, Resin Ricketts Baltimore Infirmary, 



PRECEPTORS. 

Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. Whaland, 
Pf.Dunbar,Dr. Warner, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr.Osburn, Pf.Chew, 
Dr. W. R. Scott, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. Shower, 
Dr. McNair, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof.Dunbar,Dr.Hall, 
Pf.Dunbar, Dr.Smith, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Smith, 
Univ. Maryland 1844, 
Univ. Maryland 1854, 
Md. Med. Institute, 
Dr. Grimes, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Chew, 



Thompson, Thomas J. 
Truitt, David 
Tuck, Washington G. 
Tull, J. Emory 



Van Bibber, Frederick 

Vaughan, Henry 

Vandersloot, Frederic William Dr. Huber, 

Vandersloot, Frederic Wm., Jr. Dr. Haller, 



Dr. A. C. Thompson, 
Dr. McKew, 
Md. Med. Institute, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. Van Bibber, 
Dr. Bordley, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

U. S, Navy. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Ohio. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mississippi. 

Pennsylva'a. 

Pennsylva'a. 



14 CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Wales, Philip Skinner Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Weems, George W., M.D., Univ. Maryland 1854, Maryland. 

Westmoreland, William G. N. Carolina. 

Williams, P. W. Prof. Dunbar, Virginia. 

Williams, Thomas H. B. Dr. Lyles, Mississippi. 

Willing, James S. Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Wilson, Robert Taylor Dr. Wilson, Dist. of Col. 



GRADUATES 



At the Annual Commencement held March 1th, 1854, the following Can- 
didates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


James Bussey Amos, 


. Maryland. 


Jolin William Anderson, 


Maryland. 


Charles Alexander Ashlin, 


Ohio 


Kobert Atkinson, 


Maryland. 


Francis Harwood Board, 


North Carolina 


Lemuel Bush Brattan, 


Maryland. 


John J. Burgess, 


Maryland. 


John C. Bush, . . 


Maryland. 


James Stevens Chaplain, 


Maryland. 


William Walter Childs, . 


Maryland. 


George Timothy Collins, 


Maryland. 


Henry Cornelius C<5fnegys, . 


Maryland. 


William Francis Costin, 


Maryland. 


Augustin James Dalrymple, 


Maryland. 


Van Elias Delashmutt, 


Maryland. 


Edwin George Dickenson^ . 


Maryland. 


Basil Suel Dixon, 


Maryland. 


Lloyd Dorsey, Jr., . 


Maryland. 


Augustine Demetrius Doyle, . 


. Pennsylvania. 


James Johnson Duncan, . 


Pennsylvania. 


Joseph A. Eschhach, . 


Maryland. 


Eobert Bruce Faunt Le Koy, 


Virginia. 


Samuel Groome Fisher, 


Maryland. 


Archibald George, . 


Maryland. 


George Hammond, 


Maryland. 


George Washington Hewitt, 


Pennsylvania. 


John W. M. Hopkins, . 


Virginia. 


Jonathan Anthony Castle Hower, . 


Maryland. 


Edgar Dewitt Hurtt, . 


Maryland. 



16 



GRADUATES. 



NAMES. 

Robert Morris Key, 
William Wallace Lambdin, 
John Winborn Lewis, 
William Edward Magruder, 
William Taylor McMecben, 
Richard Tasker Mitchell, 
Edward Smith Motter, 
William Henry Murray, 
Samuel James Norris, 
Joseph James O'Donnell, 
James Henry Owings, 
James Alfred Perkins, . 
Philip Pettebone, Jr., 
Elisha James Roach, . 
Fenwick Robertson, 
Edward Christian Sohn, 
Christian Steinhofer^ 
Lewis James Sutton, . 
Charles Edward Tarr, 
James Carey Thomas, . 
William Henry Thompson, Jr 
George Washington Weems, 
Arthur White, 
Silas Chapman White, . 
Jacob Henry Wiendahl, . 
John James Wise, 
Isaac iS"ewton Wood, 
Frederick Worrell, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
North Carolina. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Pennsylvania. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Louisiana. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



■Deceased October, 1854. 



J 



■\ 



FEES. STATUTES, &c. 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 8th of October, 
1855, and close on the first of March, 1856. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, Chem- 
istry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Practice of 
Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each ; for Experimental 
Physiology and Microscopy, five dollars; Practical Anatomy, 
ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

Ten students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as 
clinical assistants. The fee is one hundred dollars per year, 
payable in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is ^yq dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two cour- 
ses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in some 
other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Fa- 
culty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of his 
own composition, on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by special vote of 
the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 



18 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

scliool. He must also produce evidence of attendancCj during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which "is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before a candidate can be ad- 
mitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the can- 
didate may be re-examined, if he desire it ; or he may decline 
a second examination, and assume the position of a candidate 
in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the result 
of his final examination. 

Tlie Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood, 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and pro- 
longed absence from Lectures will always be regarded as ob- 
stacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sunday excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 
Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without spe- 
cial permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of Anat- 
omy. By vote of Faculty, 

QEOEGE W. MILTENBEKGER, Dean, 

J^t* The Ja7iitor, icho may he found at his house on the University grounds^ will 
direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient hoarding houses. The expenses of living 
are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country, good hoarding being obtained at 
from $3 to $4^er week. 



■^B&6/«-- ^«r£y Y ^^:< ■^es:^/*' 



THE 



BALTIMORE INFIEMARl' 



T 





is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the Universityj and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently 
been erected^ containing commodious private apartments sej)arate 
from the more public portion of the house. Persons from a dis- 
tance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find the 
Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from iliree to ten dollars 23er week, according to the 
accommodations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. J. A. Doyle, Resi- 
dent Physician. 



5^^^^^^^^5S?^^^^^^9^^ 




REGISTER 



OF THE 



FACULTY, OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 

OF THE 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT, 

(THE SCHOOL OF LETTERS) 

UNDER THE 

FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

(WITH THE COURSE OF STUDY, CLASSES, TERMS, &c.) 
Session 1855 — 56. 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY JOHN D. TOY 

1856. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, L. L. D. 

PROVOST. 



FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, AND MEMBERS OF THE 
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

Rev. E. a. DALRYMPLE, Dean. 

professor of ancient languages. 

Rev. GEORGE W. BURNAP, D.D. 
J. R. W. DUNBAR, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

J. H. ALEXANDER, L.L.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS. 

CAMPBELL MORFIT, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY. 



OFFICERS 



Rev. E. a. DALRYMPLE, A. M. 

PRESIDENT AND PROFESSOR OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

J. H. ALEXANDER, L.L.D. 

PROFESSOR OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. 

CAMPBELL MORFIT, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY. 

RICHARD COTTER, A.M. 

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS. 

CHARLES H. DUPUY, 

PROFESSOR OF FRENCH AND GERMAN. 

A. J. DALRYMPLE, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH BRANCHES. 

AUGUSTUS JOHN, 

PROFESSOR OF DRAWING. 

Rev. ROBERT PIGGOT, 

PROFESSOR OF PENMANSHIP. 



STUDENTS. 

Session 1854 and 1855. 

HENRY EUGENE ALEXANDER, Baltimore, Md. 

JULIAN I. ALEXANDER, '' " 

EUGENE CARRINGTON, Richmond, Va. 

PHILIP HENRY COAKLEY, Baltimore, Md. 

PHILIP ASHTON LEE CONTEE, Washington, D. C. 

HENRY CLAY CORNER, Baltimore, Md. 

JOHN ALFORD GABLE, '' " 

WILLIAM R. GARDNER, '' '' 

CHARLES EDWARD GRINNELL, " '' 

HENRY HOLT, '' " 

MORRIS KEMP, '' " 

BENJAMIN HENRY LATROBE, " " 

ROBERT WILLIS Mcdowell, '^ '^ 

JAMES McEVOY, '^ " 

WILLIAM MURRAY, '' 

ALBERT NEILSON, " <' 

EUGENE POULTNEY, : '' '^ 

DANIEL BOWLY THOMPSON, '' '' 

JOHN WILLIAM THOMPSON, '^ '^ 

THOMAS BURNESTON WOODWARD, " " 

WILLIAM WOODWARD, '^ '« 

ABRAHAM WARWICK, Richmond, Va. 

CLARENCE WARWICK, " '^ 

— 23. 



STUDENTS. 

Session 1855 and 1856. 

EDWIN FRANKLIN ABELL, Baltimore, Md. 

GEORGE WILLIAM ABELL, " 

SAMUEL ALLEN, 

ISAAC EDMONSON ATKINSON, " " 

WILLIAM BUCKLER AUSTIN, 

JAMES EDMONDSON BARROLL, " " 

JOHN bernt:y, 

WILLIAM GRAHAM BOWDOIN, " 

WALLACE ALEXANDER BOWIE, '' " 

CHARLES HENRY BREDEMEYER, '' " 

ISAAC BROOKS, '' " 

FRANK BROWN '' '^ 

FREDERICK BROWN, '' '^ 

GEORGE WASHINGTON BURNS, '^ '• 

CHARLES ARTHUR CARROLL, '' 

WILSON MILES CARY, '• '' 

CHARLES SHIRLEY CARTER, '' '^ 

DUNCAN CLINCH CLARK, Washiiigton, D. C. 

JACOB ISRAEL COHEN, Baltimore, Md. 

HENRY CLAY CORNER, '' '« 

MALCOM CRICHTON, " " 

CHARLES CUGLE, '' " 

ROBERT Mcdowell cuGLE, " ^ 

SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, 

THOMAS DONALDSON " " 

JOSEPH TODHUNTER ELLICOTT, '> " 

HENRY FISHER, '• '^ 

PARKS FISHER, '' '' 

JOHN ALFORD GABLE, '^ 

ALBERT GAilBRILL, " " 

CHARLES BOTELER GIBSON, " 

WILLIAM GILMOR, " " 

HOFFMAN GILMOR, " " 

ELIAS GLENN, 



6 

CHARLES JIAMILTON GRAHAM, Newbern, N. C. 

CHARLES EDWARD GRL\NELL, Baltimore, Md. 

BENJAMLN MACKELL HEIGHE, ^' " 

SAMUEL ENGLISH HOPKINS, " '' 

DAVID RIDGELY HOWARD, " '' 

HARRY CARROLL HOWARD, " " 

JOHN REAL HOWARD, Baltimore Co. 

GRESHAM HOUGH, Baltimore, Md. 

ROBERT HOUGH, " 

T. PIXCKXEY HUGHER, " '' 

JAMES CARSHE HYLAXD, " " 

BENJAMIN WRIGHT JENKINS, " "■ 

HARRISON TYLER JOHNSON, '' " 

BENJAMIN HENRY LATROBE, " '' 

ALONZO LILLY, JR '' " 

CHANNING LILLY, " '' 

LEONARD COVINGTON MACKALL, " " 

ROBERT WILLIS Mcdowell, " " 

JAMES McEVOY, " '' 

ROBERT VANDERBURGH McKDI, " " 

FRANK MORISON, '' "■ 

WILLIAM MURRAY, , '' '' 

KENNEDY OWEN NORRIS, " " 

FREDERICK DAWSON NORWOOD, " '' 

EUGENE POULTNEY, '' '' 

CHARLES HAMILTON RINGGOLD, '' " 

JOHN BROWN ROGERS, " " 

HENRY AUGUSTUS STINNECKE, '' " 

RALEIGH COLSTON THOMAS, " '' 

DANIEL BOWLY THOMPSON, " '' 

JOHN WILLIAM THOMPSON, '' " 

JOSEPH GOODLOE TOMPKINS, '' " 

WILLIAM HALL TURNER, '' " 

EUGENE VAN NESS, '' " 

CLARENCE WARWICK, Richmond, Va. 

THOMAS POOL WILLIAMS, Baltimore, Md. 

AUGUSTUS ST WART WOLCOTT, Providence, R. I. 

AUGUSTUS SCHNEBLY WILSON, Baltimore, Md. 

THOMAS BURNESTON WOODWARD, " " 

WILLIAM WOODWARD, ,.. " "■ 

— U 



I 



1 



SCHOOL OF LETTERS. 



The Academic Department of the University of Maryland, 
was re-organized under the Faculty of Acts and Sciences, 
in October, 1854, and styled the "School of Letters of the 
University of Maryland." Its object is, to provide a place 
and facilities where youths may obtain an exact and thorough 
literary education. The course of study is as full and com- 
prehensive as that of any respectable Institution in the 
country. It embraces, in addition to the ordinary English 
studies for less advanced students the Ancient and Modern 
Languages, History, Mathematics, Katural Philosophy and 
Chemistry, together with the other branches usually deemed 
requisite for a finished education. Especial attention is 
bestowed upon the Latin and Greek Classics and Mathe- 
matics, as the foundation of all sound learning. 

DIVISION OF THE SCHOOL. 

The School of Letters consists of two divisions, the Pre- 
paratory and the College Department^ corresponding to the 
Grammar School and College of most Institutions for 
superior instruction. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Into this Department, are received all students whose 
age or advancement requires elementary instruction in the 
Languages and Mathematics. It also admits those who are 
designed for commercial or other business pursuits, — those 
whose attention is particularly occupied with classical studies, 
and who are not sufficiently advanced for, or who do not 
intend to enter, the College Classes, and also those students 
who are preparing for finishing their education, according to 
the full and regular course of the Institution. 

In this Department there are several classes, arranged 
with regard to the age and progress of the students, or their 



8 

future studies. Special instruction is from time to time given 
in such branclieSj as the President may deem important for 
those who do not contemplate entering the College Classes. 
All such students, however, are required to study Mathe- 
matics, and at least one Ancient and one Modern Language. 
In the case of other students, the branches attended to will 
be regulated, as the President may deem most judicious for 
sound intellectual culture. All the students are required to 
attend the lessons of the Drawing and Writing masters, 
unless excused by the President, on the written request of 
the parent or guardian. 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

Into this division of the School of Letters are received all 
students, whose progress in Greek, Latin, Mathematics, &c. 
is such as to justify their advancement, and who are assumed 
to be candidates for the degree of A. B. There are but three 
classes, viz: the Junior, Middle and Senior, corresponding 
respectively to the classes usually styled Sophomore, Junior 
and Senior. There is no Freshman Class: The studies 
usually assigned, to that class will be pursued in the Pre- 
paratory Department, where experience has shown they may 
be attended to with greater advantage. Every student is 
required to pursue all the prescribed studies of the class^, of 
which he is a member. Students, under certain circum- 
stances, may be admitted to a partial College course, but 
they will not be entitled to receive the degree of A. B. at 
the completion of the course. 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR ADMISSION. 

All students applying for admission into the School of 
Letters, and who have come from any other Institution of 
learning regularly incorporated, must present a testimonial of 
honorable dismission from the President, or Head of such 
Institution. If circumstances render it impracticable to 
procure this testimonial, then satisfactory evidence must be 
furnished to the President^ that the applicant left such School 
or College in good standing. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Boys are received as students in tliis Department, without 
respect to age, wlio can read and write, and have made some 
progress in the ordinary English branches, such as Geography_, 
Elementary History, Arithmetic, &c. These are the lowest 
qualifications. Any one can he received who is sufiiciently 
advanced to commence, or continue a classical course. 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

Into this Department will be admitted all students, who 
have passed through the course prescribed for the Prepara- 
tory Department, or who can stand a satisfactory examination 
in such studies and authors as may be required for admission 
into the College Classes. The applicant will be admitted 
into any class, — Junior, Middle or Senior, for which his 
examination may show him to be qualified, provided, how- 
ever, that for admission into the Senior Class, he must, in 
addition to the satisfactory examination, keep the ivhole 
Senior Term of one vear. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

The course in this division of the School of Letters, is not 
confined to any fixed number of years. The students are 
advanced as rapidly as is consistent with their sound improve- 
ment. Every student attends at least four recitations or 
classes daily, from forty-five minutes to one hour each. 

The following schedule will give an idea of the branches 
and authors studied : 

Exglish: Reading; Orthography; Geography; History of Eng- 
land; France; U. States; and also some Compendium of Gene- 
ral and Ancient History; Memoriter Exercises; Prose Com- 
position and Letter Writing, with especial reference to the 
orthography, punctuation, and grammatical construction of 
sentences. 



10 

Mathematics: Elementary and Practical Arithmetic; Higher 
Arithmetic; Mensuration; Elementary and Higher Algebra; 
Geometry; Land Surveying, &c. 

Latin: Lessons; Grammar; Historia. Sacra; Latin Reader; Phsedrus 
Cornelius Nepos; Caesar; Ovid; Sallust; Virgil; Livy, &c. &c. 
Memoriter Exercises; and Exercises in writing Latin Prose 
and Verses. 

Greek: Lessons; Grammar; Reader; Xenophon's Anabasis; He- 
rodotus; Selections from the Iliad of Homer; &c. &c. Also, 
Memoriter Exercises; and Exercises in v^^riting Greek 
' Prose and Verses. 

French: Grammar; Verbs; Reader; Telemaque; La Fontaine's 
Fables; Moliere, &c. &c. Memoriter Exercises; and Exer- 
cises in writing French Prose. 

German: Grammar; Verbs; Reader; Schiller; Goethe, &c. &;c. 
Memoriter Exercises; Exercises in writing German Prose. 

Drawing : Lead Pencil, Crayon and Water Colors. 

Penmanship : Plain and Ornamental. 

Chemistry: Elementary Principles Illustrated with Experiments, 

Natural Philosophy: Elementary Principles Illustrated w^ith 
Experiments. 

The Spanisli and Italian Languages will be taught as soon 
as the wants and condition of the School may make it ex- 
pedient to introduce them. Particular and unvarying atten- 
tion is bestowed upon the prosody of the Latin and Greek 
Languages. The pronunciation of the vowels is that which 
prevails over Europe, and which is now adopted by many of 
the first Institutions of Learning in the United States. Con- 
stant reference is had to the grammar of the respective lan- 
guages which are studied, and a recitation is had daily in 
the Latin and Greek Grammers during a Student's entire 
connection with the Institution. 

Students who are designed for business, as stated above, 
will receive especial instruction, not set forth in the regular 
course, with reference to their future occupations. 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

The full Course comprises three years. Each Class attends 
at least four recitations or lectures daily. There are reviews of 
authors and studies previously attended to, from time to time. 



11 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Greek: Xenophon's Memorabilia, or Cyropogdia; Euripides; Hero- 
dotus; Greek Prose and Verse Compositions; Memoriter 
Exercises. 

Latin: Livy; Horace; Cicero de Officiis; Cicero de Senectute et 
Amicitia; Catullus; Latin Prose and Verse Compositions; 
Memoriter Exercises. 

French: Study of Authors and writing Prose Compositions. 

German: Study of Authors and writing Prose Compositions. 

Mathematics : Higher Algebra and Geometry reviewed; Plain 
and Spherical Trigonometry, with their applications. 

Ancient and Modern Geography and History. 

Rhetoric, and the Composition of Themes in Prose and Verse. 

Chemistry and Natural Philosophy. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

Greek: Homer's Iliad and Odessy; Sophocles; Demostlienes de 

Corona; Greek Prose and Verse Compositions; Memoriter 

Exercises. 
Latin: Tacitus; Horace, Ars poetica; Plautus; Juvenal and Persius; 

Cicero, Epistolas ad Diversos; Prose and Verse Compositions; 

Memoriter Exercises. 
French and German: Study of Authors, &c. 
Mathematics : Analytical Geometry; Conic Sections, with review 

of Trigonometry. 
Chemistry and Natural Philosophy. 
History and Antiquities. 
Moral Philosophy and Rhetoric; Composition of Themes in 

Prose and Verse. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Greek: Aristophanes; iEschylus; Thucydides; Extracts from Plato 
and Aristotle; Greek Prose and Verse Compositions; Memo- 
riter Exercises. 

Latin: Terence; Cicero de Oratore and Orations; Epistolaa ad 
Atticum; Quintilian; Lucan; Lucretius; Latin Prose and 
Verse Compositions; Memoriter Exercises. 

French and German: Literature and Writing Themes. 



12 

Mathematics : Descriptive Geometry; DifTerential and Integral 
Calculus: Application of* Mathematics to Astronomy, Me- 
chanics, &c. 

History and Antiquities. 

Logic and Intellectual Philosophy. 

Physics and Chemistry, in their technical applications. 

It is to he understood, that all the authors named in the 
course^ are not necessarily read in the class room. Some 
may be required to be read privately for examination, at the 
close of the Term. Changes ^ill be made from time to time, 
as may be deemed most judicious for the Students' thorough 
acquaintance with Greek and Latin Literature. 

The Grammars used in the College Department are Zumpt's 
Larger Latin and Kuhner"s Larger Greek Grammar. The 
Greek Lexicon of Liddell and Scott, and the Latin Lexicons 
of Leverett and Andrews, are the ones preferred. In Latin 
Prose Composition^ Krebs' Latin Guide and Arnold. In 
G-reek Prose Composition, Anthon and Arnold. 

At proper intervals in the College course, will be intro- 
duced instructions or lectures upon Belles-Letters, Mine- 
ralogy and Geology, Natural History, and such other topics 
as may be deemed most judicious. 

The Italian and Spanish Languages will also be taught, 
when their introduction may be considered expedient, though 
a knowledge of them will not be requisite for graduation. 

LECTUEES AND EECITATIOXS. 

Lectures will be delivered from time to time, by the Pro- 
fessors of Ancient Languages, Chemistry, Physics, &c. in 
their respective branches, attendance upon which is obliga- 
tory upon every student who is directed to be present. 

Every recitation in every class of the School is valued by 
the Professor or Master, and recorded in a book. The max- 
imum for a perfect recitation is 10, and all recitations^ exer- 
cises, &c. are estimated with reference to that number. A 
report of every student's standing in his various classes is 
handed to the President, at the end of every month. These 
reports are recorded in a book; and every student's place and 



13 

standing in his class, and in competition for the school- 
l^rizes, are determined from them. Parents and guardians^, 
who wish it, can^ on application, receive a copy of their son's 
or ward's standing in his classes and deportment, and also 
examine the record of his demerits and impositions. 

Every student in the Preparatory Department is required 
to prepare at home, (or at school, out of school hours, when 
so permitted,) such lessons as may be prescribed. No excuse 
for want of preparation will be admitted, except for indispo- 
sition or like imperative necessity, on the parent's or guar- 
dian's written request, and then only for such lessons, as in 
the President's judgment, could not^ for want of time^ be 
prepared in school hours. 

PENALTIES AND IMPOSITIONS. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

In this Department, the ordinary penalties imposed upon 
delinquent students, are the writing off of words or lines 
from some prescribed book, — the committing to memory of 
a certain number of lines from some author, — detention 
after school hours, — writing off and repeating the lesson 
missed, — returning to the University on Saturday morning, — 
public reprimands, — suspension from class, &c. These pen- 
alties are imposed for tardiness,^ without j^'oper excuse, (as 
explained hereafter,) want of preparation for class lessons, 
&c. failure to have exercises or compositions in time, violation 
of the rules of good order^ decorum, &c. &c. For every 
violation of school laws, demerit marks are given according 
to a certain rule, well established by usage. These demerit 
marks, as stated elsewhere, affect a student in his competition 
for prizes. 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

In this Department, the penalties for violation of the rules 
of the College, good order_, &c. are demerit marks, admo- 
nition, reprimand, and suspension, according to the nature 
of the offence. 



14 

In both Departments of the school, students will be liable 
to dismission or expulsion, for serious violations of good order 
or decorum, as well as for perseverance (after admonition,) 
in insubordinate conduct, or in negligence in preparing for, 
and attending to, their proper class exercises. 

HONORS AND PEIZES. 

In the Preparatory Department^ a Gold Medal, called the 
''President's Medal," is conferred upon the student, whose 
standing in all his classes; — having respect also to his 
punctual attendance, his deportment and compliance with 
the regulations of the Institution, is above all the rest of his 
fellow-students. 

A Silver Medal is given in each Department of study,, &c. 
to the student who is above all the rest of the students in that 
Department, e. g. for Deportment, Latin, Greek, French, 
&c. &c. 

A smaller Silver or Bronze Medal is also given in every 
class in the Preparatory Department, to the student who 
stands highest in that class. 

A Bronze Medal, or Honorary Certificate is also conferred 
upon every student who has maintained a respectable stand- 
ing in any class of which he is a member. 

Competition for the above prizes and honors, is affected by 
a student's punctuality, deportment, &c. so that, other 
things being equal, the prize will be given to the student 
whose demerits are fewest. 

In the College Department, a Gold Medal will be given in 
each class to the student, whose standing is highest, unless 
peculiar circumstances may render it inexpedient. 

EXAMINATIONS AND DEGREES. 

An examination of the students of the Preparatory De- 
partment will be held, in the discretion of the President and 
Faculty, at the close of the term. The examination of the 
College classes will take place at the same time in the 
presence of the Provost and Regents of the University, the 



15 

parents of the students, and such other persons as may be 
invited by the President and Faculty. 

Certificates for proficiency in any particular branch or 
study, may be conferred in the discretion of the Faculty, 
upon such students as have taken only a partial course, and 
whose examination has been found satisfactory. 

The degree of A. B. will be conferred upon those students, 
of not less than one whole year's standing, who have passed 
through the full regular course, and whose examination in 
the following branches has been found satisfactory, viz: the 
Greek, Latin, French, and German Languages, Mathematics, 
Physics^ Chemistry, Moral and Intellectual Philosophy. 
Every student must, at the time of receiving his degree, 
publicly deliver an original address^, essay or poem, accord- 
ing to usage, unless excused by the President and Faculty 
for satisfactory reasons. 

The degree of A. M. will be conferred upon bachelors of 
three years standing, who have been engaged in literary or 
scientific pursuits^ or who are members of one of the learned 
professions, on the condition of their presenting to the 
Faculty before, or at the time of receiving the degree, an 
original essay upon some subject chosen by themselves. 

CERTAIN EEGULATIONS. 

The exercises of the school, from the loth of October to the 
15^7^ of Marchy commence at 9 A. M. precisely: for the re- 
mainder of the Term, they commence at 8^ a. m. School 
closes daily, (except Saturday,) at 2\ p. m. There is a recess 
of half an hour at 11| a. m. The school is not in session on 
Saturday, except for those students who have been specially 
delinquent in their studies or deportment. 

Students are required to be present at the hour of opening. 
Parents and guardians are earnestly requested to insist upon 
their sons' punctual attendance, and not to furnish them 
with notes for tardiness. When, from unavoidable causes, a 
student is necessarily detained, the note of excuse must state 
precisely the duration of the detention_, otherwise, the note 
will be liable to be disrescarded. 



16 

Notes of excuse from parents for their sons' failure to pre- 
pare their recitations at home, will only be received for those 
lessons which the student could not find time to prepare in 
school. 

Every student who absents himself from school, must, on 
his return, j)roduce a written note signed by his parent or 
guardian, stating the cause and duration of his absence. 

Those who do not bring such a note, will be considered as 
having absented themselves without the permission of their 
parents or guardians, and be noticed accordingly. 

All excuses for absence, tardiness, &c. must be signed by 
the Student' s parent or guardian: notes not thus signed, will 
be disregarded. 

Tardiness and absence from school exercises, as well on 
Saturday (when the student is required to return,) as on 
other days, not only affect a student's position in his classes, 
but also, very seriously, his standing in competing for the 
honors of the school. 



In the College Department, every student is required to be 
present punctually at the hour of lecture or recitation. 
Students not present in time, are liable not to be admitted 
until the lecture or recitation is over. Ko student shall be 
absent from recitation or lecture, except at the instance of 
his parent or guardian, with the President's permission. 
Students in this Department are assumed to be beyond the 
necessity of penalties and impositions suitable for younger 
boys, and for this reason, in every respect^ so far as their 
own conduct and diligence will justify, they will be treated 
as young gentlemen of elevated principles, and a proper 
sense of their high obligations and responsibility as College 
students. 

SESSION AND VACATION. 

There is but one term both for the College and Preparatory 
Department. It commences on the second Monday of Sep- 
tember^ and ends on the third Thursday of June. The re- 
mainder of the vear will be vacation. 



'-.^^m£^^^£^^^^^^^s^i^s^ 






FOETY-NINTII 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Hitihrsit]) 0f Ptariihnii, 




BALTIMO RE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



'81 



M D C C C L V T 



^S^;^^fe^g^^^^^^^5^£^5^2^^^fe^ 



FORTY-NOTH 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

SESSION 1856-57, 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES, 



SESSION 1855-56 



B A L T I M E E : 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD k CO. 



MDCCCLYI. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL.D., Provost. 

FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN K. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND PATHOLOGY. 



BERWICK B. SMITH, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

DEAN. 



PETER SMITH, Janitor. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

JOHN A. DOYLE, M. D Resident Physician. 

Sister ANN DE SALES Sister Superior 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS, 



WILLIAM J. BOARMAN, M. D., 
ALEXANDER MORTIMER BROOKE, 
SILAS MAREAN CHATARD, 
JOSEPH LOYAL COWLES, 
JAMES J. DUKE, 
ERASMUS GARROTT, 



THOMAS MARTIN JORDAN, 

CHARLES H. JORDAN, 

SAMUEL A. MUDD, 

HENRY CLAY ROGERS, 

PETER J. MCGARY, 

J. CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON, M. D. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



The forty-nintli session will begin on Thursday, October 
9th, 1856, and end on the first of March, 1857. 

The Faculty, for the last .four years, have abandoned the 
custom of devoting the first week of the session to a series 
of introductory lectures, from a conviction, that the time can 
be more profitably occupied by entering, at once, upon the 
real object of public instruction — the communication of pro- 
fessional knowledge. There will be, therefore, but one gen- 
eral introductory, after which the regular lectures will com- 
mence. 

The views of the Faculty upon the character and objects of 
medical education have been fully and frankly expressed in 
former years. They do not consider it necessary to repeat 
them. Their aim will be to teach, not all that is known, but 
such knowledge as may be best adapted for oral instruction, 
and most likely to be useful to the student in his future pro- 
fessional life. They seek and strive to make their instruc- 
tions plain and practical, requiring, on the part of the pupil, 
a proper amount of preliminary preparation, fair capacity 
for comprehending what is taught, a sincere desire to profit 
by the opportunities offered to him, some intrinsic love of 
knowledge, and industry and application in its pursuit : 
promising, on their part, diligent devotion to their duties, 
and honest effort to display the truths of science accurately 
and intelligibly. Though they do not believe that a medical 
education can be begun and finished in a public school, they 
are fully convinced, that properly prepared for it, with a true 
estimate of its purposes and uses, the student will find the 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

training and discipline to which he is there subjected, of in- 
finite value in guiding him to a knowledge of the principles 
and practice of the Science and the Art to which his life is 
to be devoted. Its great object is to teach truth : but it 
cannot, never has, and never will, convert the ignorant, idle, 
incompetent and inefficient, into apt and accomplished fol- 
lowers of a liberal profession. There must be. some ability 
to understand and apply what is taught : some endeavor to- 
wards active appreciation, and some recognition of the fact, 
that education, in Science or Art, cannot be reduced to a 
mere process of passive reception. The pupil must see clearly 
that whoever may be his teacher, and however attractive 
and complete may be the instruction, he can only make the 
advantages he enjoys available for the end he has in view, by 
industrious and intelligent personal effort. The public teacher 
and private preceptor can do much in exciting and develop- 
ing the intellectual powers of those with whom they may be 
brought into relation : the pupil himself, judiciously directed 
and rightly inclined, by careful cultivation of his mental 
faculties and assiduous attention to his duties, can do vastly 
more. The skillful craftsman becomes such not solely by the 
teachings of his master, but by his own patience, persever- 
ance and energy. If this be true of the practitioner of an 
Art, it can hardly be less true of the students of a Science. 

The course of instruction in the University embraces the * 
Principles and Practice of Surgery, Chemistry and Phar- 
macy, the Principles and Practice of Medicine, Anatomy and 
Physiology, Obstetrics, Materia Medica, Therapeutics and 
Pathology. 

Clinical instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given at 
the ^' Baltimore Infirmary," which contains a hundred and 
fifty beds, is in the immediate neighborhood, belongs to the 
University, and is under the control and management of the 
Faculty. It was originally established, for purposes of clini- 
cal instruction, during the connection of the late Professor 
Granville Sharpe Pattison with the University, and has been 
maintained as such over thirty years. That it has admirably 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

fulfilled the designs of its founders, the Faculty have the as- 
surance of their own observation, and the testimony of the 
numerous active members of the profession who have been 
trained within its walls. As an adjunct to the course of in- 
struction^ it has been, and continues to be of inestimable worth. 
Abstract teaching has its value, yet it can scarcely hope to 
reach its highest good without the aid of palpable and visible 
demonstration. A lecture on typhoid fever, or pneumonia, or 
fracture, or hernia, may contain all that is needful to be 
known, but without a direct appeal to the senses, by actual 
exhibition of the patient, this knowledge will inevitably be 
vague and imperfect. The use of clinical instruction consists 
in the power.it bestows of identifying disease; it presents the 
reality to be compared and contrasted with the ideal concep- 
tion of it. 

The wards of the Infirmary are open to all matriculates of 
the school throughout the year. During the Session, Clini- 
cal lectures are given four times a week, in Medicine and. 
Surgery, and the student is at liberty to attend the daily 
visits of the Physician and Surgeon. 

The opportunities for studying practical anatomy are am- 
ple. Material is usually abundant and supplied at moderate 
expense. The rooms are opened early in October, and, being 
lighted by gas, dissections may be carried on at night. The 
Faculty recjuire of all candidates for graduation evidence of 
attendance on clinical instruction and practical anatomy, 
because they believe, that no one ought to be permitted to 
treat the living who has not observed the diseases of the liv- 
ing, and learned something of the structure of the human 
body. It was a saying of Harvey, that " without experience, 
not other men's but his own, no man is a disciple of any part 
of natural knowledge; without experimental skill in anat- 
omy, he no better apprehends its truths than a man born 
blind can judge of the nature and difference of colors, or one 
born deaf of sounds." 

The Faculty have also the pleasure of announcing that, 
besides the regular course of instruction, students who wish. 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

will have an opportunity of attending a course of lectures by 
Christopher Johnston, M. D., on " Physiology and Histol- 
ogy." This course will consist of two lectures weekly. Fee 
five dollars. 

The "School of Medicine, University of Maryland," has 
existed nearly half a century. Its alumni have always 
maintained a character which their " Alma Mater" is proud 
to recognize and acknowledge. To them she appeals for such 
testimony as shall contribute in the future, as in the past, 
to her prosperity, usefulness and honor. 

By order of the Faculty, i 

George W. Miltenberger, Dean. 

Baltimore, March , 



CATALOGUE OF MATEICULATES 



SESSIOIQ" 1355-56, 



NAMES. 

Alday, Alfred F. 
Aldridge, John H. M. D., 
Ashcom, John C. 
Atkinson, Edwin Eagle 
Atkinson, Robert M. D., 
Baden, Joseph Abell 
Barber, Philip D. 
Best, William Janney 
Betts, Solomon Jr., 
Billingslea, Uriah H. 
Birche, Andrew D. 
Blandford, Joseph H. 
Boarman, William J. M. D., 
Bowdle, William J. 
Bowlen, George W. 
Brewer, George G. 
Brooke, Alexander M. 
Brown, James M. 
Brown, James H. 
Bruce, William H. 
Buckner, Edw^ard G. 
Butler, James H. 
Carson, William Cowan 
Chatard, Silas Marean 
Clagett, Benjamin F. 
Clark D. 
Clawson, J. E. M. D., 



PRECEPTORS. 

Prof. Smith, 

Univ. Maryland 1855, 

Dr. Brown, 

Dr. Holton, 

Univ. Maryland 1854, 

Prof. Chew, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Janney, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Billingslea, 

Dr. McLaughlin, 

Prof. Chew, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Dr. Carroll, 

Dr. Baldwin, 

Prof. Chew, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Prof. Dunbar, 

Dr. Crane, 

Prof. Miltenberger, 

Dr. Buckner, 

Dr. Fields, 

Drs. Smith & Rowland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Clark,: 

Univ. Maryland 1855, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Pennsylva'a. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
^Liryland. 
N. Carolina. 
Maryland. 



10 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMES. 


PRECEPTOIIS, 


RESIDENCE. 


Cline, Philip M. 


Drs. Rice & Sommers, 


Virginia. 


Collins, George T. M. D., 


Univ. Maryland 1854, 


Maryland. 


Covey, Edward H. 


Univ. Maryland 1855, 


Maryland. 


Cowell, Robert B. 


Dr. Richards, 


Virginia. 


Cowles, Joseph Loyal 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Georgia. 


Cronmiller, John Jr., 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Dalrymple, A. J. M. D., 


Univ. Maryland 1855, 


Maryland. 


Davis, Francis M. 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Dawson, Wm. Hambleton 


Prof Chew, 


Maryland. 


Dickinson, Albert Harrison 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Dorsey, A. W. 


Dr. Knight, 


Maryland. 


Dorsey, Lloyd Jr., 


Univ. Maryland 1854, 


Maryland. 


Dorsey, Robert W. 


Dr. Frick, 


Maryland, 


Downing, Stratton Bayley 


Dr. Downing, 


Virginia. 


Duke, James J. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Espin, Jose Raphael 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Cuba. 


Evans, William J. 


Drs. Smith and Evans, 


Maryland. 


Everhart, Oliver Troxel, 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Ewing, J. 


( Drs. Treadwell & 
I Elliot, 


Maryland. 


Fisher, William F. 


Dr, Henderson, 


Virginia. 


Fowler, James Carter 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Fields, Andrew J. 


Dr. Clark, 


Virginia. 


French, Henry C. 


Dr. Hubbard, 


Pennsylva'a 


Garrott, Erasmus 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Gibson, George S. 


Drs. Roby & Johnston, 


Maryland. 


Glenn, William Ellis 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Virginia. 


Goldsborough, Charles C. 


Dr. Goldsborough, 


Maryland. 


Goldsborough, John 


Dr. Tyler, 


Maryland. 


Gordon, R. Sullivan 


Dr. Hopkins, 


Maryland. 


Graves, R. H. 


« 


Maryland. 


Griffith, George R. 


Dr. Stansbury, 


Maryland. 


Gwynn, William H. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Hall, John Edward 


Dr. Crane, 


Maryland. 


Hamilton, Alexander D. 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Hanna, George S. 


Dr. Moran, 


Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



11 



NAMES. 


PRECEPTORS. 


RESIDENCE. 


*Harris, Morgan 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


— Harris, Chapman 


Univ. Virginia, 


Maryland. 


Harris, C. B. 


Dr. Piggot, 


Maryland. 


/ Harrison, James 0. 


Dr. Harrison, 


Virginia. 


Haynes, T. J. 


Drs. Lyles & Murphy, 


Mississippi. 


Haynes, J. W. 


Drs. Lyles & Murphy, 


Mississippi. 


Hedges, Charles M. T. 


Dr. Hedges, 


Virginia. 


Hellen, William D. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Hendrix, Henry A. 


Univ. Maryland 1855, 


Pennsylva'a. 


,^Hobson, T. S. 


Dr. Hobson, 


Maryland. 


Henderson, Walter S. 


Dr.;Henderson, 


Virginia. 


Hobbs, Rezin T. 


Dr. Thompson, 


Pennsylva'a. 


— , Hodges, W. E. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


•Hodson, Eugene 


Drs. Roby & Johnston, 


, Maryland. 


Hull, Joseph Janney 


Drs. Roby& Johnston, 


Maryland. 


-— ^ Iglehart, David T. 


Dr. Hardey, 


Maryland. 


Iglehart, 0. S. 


Dr. Claude, 


Maryland. 


^ Ireland, John F. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Johns, A. B. Jr., 


Dr. Johns, 


N. Carolina. 


Jordan, Thomas Martin 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Pennsylva'a 


Jordan, Charles H. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Virginia. 


Johnson, Richard Bourne 


Dr. Bourne, 


Pennsylva^a. 


- «^- Keech, Thomas A. R. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


-.: Kemp, John Dodson 


Prof. Smith, 


Ohio. 


Kinzer, S. Gore, 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Koechling, Charles W. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Koogler, Adam M. D., 




Ohio. 


Laney, William Housel 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Lambert, Charles H. 


Dr. Baltzell, 


Maryland. 


Lawrence, V. C. 


Dr. Jacob, 


Maryland. 


Leatherbury, George P. 


Dr. Sudler, 


Maryland 


Lewis, Frederic W. 


Dr. Alden, 


Virginia. 


Lowndes, Charles M. D., 


Univ. Maryland 1855, 


Maryland. 


Lynde, R. D. M. D., 


Wash. University 1852, 


JNIaryland. 


rr-:^^.. Macgill, Charles G. W. 


Dr. Macgill, 
« Deceased. 


Maryland. 



12 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMES. 


PRECEPTORS. 


RESIDENCE. 


^T Mapp, Thomas R., 


Univ. Virginia. 


Virginia. 


♦ McCauly, Laurence J. A. 


Dr. O'Donnel, 


Maryland. 


McCulloh, John K. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


McDovveil, James H. 


Dr. Cone, 


Maryland. 


McLean, William 


Dr. Dickson, 


Maryland. 


> -McGary, Peter J. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Virginia. 


McGuire, Bernard C. 


Dr. Doyle, 


New York. 


Miller, John Singleton 


Dr. Horsey, 


Virginia. 


Monmonier, John N. K. 


Dr. Monmonier, 


Maryland. 


Morgan, D. C. 


Dr. Morgan, 


Maryland. 


-^ Mudd, James Marcellus 


Dr. Mudd, 


Maryland. 


*■ Mudd, Samuel A. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Mullan, James F. 


Drs. Roby <fc Johnston 


, Maryland. 


Murray, William H. 


Univ. Maryland 1854, 


Maryland. 


Nevitt, Napoleon 


Dr. Nevitt, 


Maryland. 


Nichols, W. C. 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Alabama. 


Nickerson, Charles E. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Norfolk, William H. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Nowlan, James Lewis 


Dr. Lewis, 


Virginia. 


Orrick, John H. 


Dr. Orrick, 


Maryland. 


~- Perrie, Richard B. 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Pettebone, Philip M. D., 


Univ. Maryland 1854, 


Maryland. 


Philips, Richard L. 


Dr. Cowan, 


Virginia. 


Pierce, E. H. 


Dr. Sudler, 


IMaryland. 


Pollock, Lewis L.' 


Prof. E. Geddings, 


S. Carolina 


Price, John B. 


Dr. Johnson, 


Maryland. 


Price, B. F. 


Dr. Mitchell, 


Maryland. 


Rogers, Henry Clay 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Roman, Philip F. 




Virginia. 


Sappington, A. S. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Saunders, Walton 


University Virginia, 


Virginia. 


Scarff, William T. 


Dr. Reed, 


Maryland. 


Scheldt, Otho F. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Scott, Walter 


Prof. Dunbar, 


IMaryland. 


Scott, Henry C. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Shine, Willam G. 


Dr. Donaldson, 


Florida. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



13 



NAMES. 

Shower, Thomas A. 
Smith, John Sparrow 
Steuart, J. H. 
Steele, Joseph W. 
Stevens, John H. 
Stites, John S. 
Stonebraker, Abraham S. 
Taylor, Major S. 
Thomas, Philip F. Jr., 
Thompson, J. C. M. D., 
Thompson, J. Thomas 
Truitt, David J. 0. 
Tuck, W. G. 
Van Bibber, Frederick 
Veitch, Eldridge R. 
Wagner, Clinton 
Wales, Philip Skinner 
Warfield, James H. B. 
Wheeden, Thomas J. 
Whiteford, A. H. 
White, William P. 
Williams, P. M. 
Williams, T. H. B. 
Wilson, Robert Taylor 
Zimmerman, George M, 
Zollickoffer, William H. 



PRECEPTORS. 


RESIDENCE. 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 




Maryland. 




Maryland. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Grimes, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Ohio. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Dr. McKew, 


Maryland. 


Drs. Roby & Johnston 


, Maryland. 


Dr. Van Bibber, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Scott, 


Maryland. 




Maryland. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Hebb, 


England. 


Dr. O'Donnel, 


Maryland. 


Prof. Chew, 


Virginia. 


Dr. Lyles, 


Mississippi, 


Dr. Wilson, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Zimmerman, 


Maryland. 


Dr. Dulin, 


Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held March Qth, 


1855, the following 


Candidates received the degree of Doctor 


in Medicine. 


^ NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Jolin H. Aldridge, 


Maryland. 


J. Edmond Bennett, 


. Maryland. 


Elijah Tracie Bishop, . 


Maryland. 


William J. Boarman, 


. Maryland. 


Henry Waring Brent, 


Maryland. 


Charles Brewer, 


. Maryland. 


Henry Briscoe, 


Maryland. 


Jesse Wyandotte Brock, . 


. Ohio. 


Jesse J. Buckley, 


Maryland. 


James Emory Clawson, . 


Maryland. 


Edward K Covey, 


Maryland. 


Daniel Spencer, . . 


North Carolina. 


Henry Jeter Edmonds, 


Virginia. 


David Campell Ferguson, 


Virginia. 


Joseph Glacken, 


Maryland. 


Hiram Greentree, 


Maryland. 


Hiram Henry Gunby, 


Maryland. 


John Samuel Hammontree, 


. Ohio. 


Jacob Hay, ... 


Pennsylvania. 


James E. Healy, . . 


Maryland. 


Henry A. Hendrix, . . . . 


Pennsylvania. 


Edwin Augustus Hering, 


Maryland. 


Joshua Webster Hering, 


Maryland. 


Lewis Holmes, . , , 


Maryland. 


Joseph M. Houston, 


Delaware. 


John Harrison Hunter, 


. Virginia. 


James T. Jacobs, 


Maryland. 


Benjamin Alexander Jameson, . 


. Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 


15 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Andrew Jackson Jolinson, 


Maryland. 


Stephen Dandridge Kennedy, 


Maryland. 


William Christopher Kloman, 


Maryland. 


William Martin Lemen, 


Maryland. 


Hezekiah Linthicum, 


Maryland. 


Kichard Stewart Lomax, . 


Virginia. 


Francis Marion Lloyd, 


Maryland. 


Charles Lowndes, 


Maryland. 


Jethro Lynch, ... 


Maryland. 


Moses McLane, . 


Maryland. 


Felix Shulze McManus, 


Maryland. 


James Whann McSherry, 


Maryland. 


Anselm Washington Neal, . 


Maryland. 


Florence O'Donnoghue, . 


District of Columbia. 


Cincinnatus Outten, . 


Virginia. 


Heman Felton Perry, 


. New York. 


Charles Chesterfield Kichardsjn, 


Maryland. 


Kichard John Scott, 


Maryland. 


Duncan Sinclair, 


North Carolina. 


James Madison Slaughter, 


Maryland. 


Albert Brown Slemons, 


Maryland. 


James Smith, 


Virginia. 


Fielder Bowie Smith, 


Maryland. 


Nathan E. Smith, Jr., . 


Maryland. 


Eeuben Smith, 


Virginia. 


Arthur M. Snowden, 


Maryland. 


Eichard Stanforth, 


Maryland. 


John Bailey Taylor, 


Virginia. 


Eezin Eicketts Thompson, . 


Maryland. 


John Christopher Thompson, . 


Ohio. 


J. EmoryTull, 


Maryland. 


Henry Yaughan, 


. Mississippi, 


Frederick William Yandersloot, , 


•Pennsylvania. 


William G. Westmoreland, . 


Alabama. 



V 



FEES, STATUTES, &c. 



The next session will begin on Thursday, the 9th of Octo- 
ber, 1856, and close on the first of March, 185Y. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each. Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

Ten students are permitted to reside in the Infirmary as 
clinical assistants. The fee is one hundred dollars i)er year, 
payable in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Fa- 
culty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of his 
own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the^time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 



ANNUAL CIKCULAR. 17 

school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

G. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the can- 
didate may be re-examined, if he desire it ; or he may decline 
a second examination, and assume the position of a candidate 
in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the result 
of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish, it to be distinctly understood, 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures will always be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sunday excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 
Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without spe- 
cial permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of Anat- 
omy. By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltenbergek, Dean. 

^^ The Janitor^ loho may he found at his house, on the University grounds, will 
direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The expenses of living 
are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country, good hoarding being obtained at 
from $3 to $4 per week. 



TEXT BOOKS. 

The Faculty recommend the followinGf text hooks : 

Anatomy axd Physiology — Quain and Sharpey, Wilson's 
Anatomy, Carpenter's Elements, Kirkes and Paget's Physi- 
ology. 

Surgery — Drnitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry axd Pharmacy — Turner's Chemistry, Fowne's 
Chemistry, Grraham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics axd Diseases of Women and Children — Cazeaux's 
Churchill's, Kighy's Midwifery ; West's, Evanson's, Condie's 
Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine — Watson's Lectures^ 
Williams on Diseases of the Chest, Latham on the Heart, 
Barlow's Practice of Medicine. 

Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pathology — Pereira's 
Materia Medica^ Wood and Bache's Dispensatory, Yogel's 
and Gross's Pathological Anatomy. 



/ 




.. :-,iX^2 




BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 

I 




e '• 



I 



is constantly oijen for llie rece})tion and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently 
b3en erected, containing commodious private apartments separate 
from' the more public portion of the house. Persons from a dis- 
tance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find the 
Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the 
accommodations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. J. A. Doyle, 
Eesident Physician. 




•S^^g^^g!^^i>^^^^^g^^^- 



I 



^y-^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



F I F T I E T H 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



M 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 




SESSION IB 5 7 -'5 8. 



HALT I M () K K: 

IMllXTKl.) BY S IlKlt WOO 1> .t CO 

M I> C C C I- V I [ . 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



■ FIFTIETH 

ANNUAL CIRCULAR 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICOE, 

SESSION 1857-58, 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES, 



SESSI03Sr 1850-57. 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



MDCCCLVII. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost, 

FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS AND PATHOLOGY. 



BERWICK B. SMITH, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



GEORGE W. MILTENGERGER, M. D. 

DEAN. 



trm^\- 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

WILLIAM CHARLES NICHOLS Resident Physician. 

Sister ANN DE SALES Sister Superior. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS 



ALFRED FINE ALDAY, 



GEORGE WASHINGTON HAYNES, 



JOHN CARTWRIGHT ASHCOM, THOMAS J. HAYNES, 



JAMES CARTER FOWLER, 
JOHN GOLDSBOROUGH, 
WILLLA^ HENRY GWYNN, 



SAMUEL GORE KINZER, 
COLIN HUNTER LAMBERT, 
WILLIAM CHARLES NICHOLS. 



CIRCULAR. 



The fiftieth session will begin on Thursday, October 8th, 
1857, and end on the first of March, 1858. 

A general introductory to the course will be given, after 
which the regular lectures will commence. 

The Faculty, now in charge of the Medical department of 
the University, will endeavor to maintain, and increase, its 
reputation as a school for accurate training in those branches 
of knowledge most useful to the medical practitioner. Ke- 
viewing the past, they have no reason to doubt, that the 
course heretofore pursued has been judicious and beneficial. 
Believing the doctrine, that a clear appreciation of element- 
ary truths is the foundation of all knowledge, scientific and 
artistic^ and that, in this country, practical application, and 
the ability to make this application, are essential to success, 
they have attempted, faithfully, to prepare their pupils for 
the performance of their professional duties with skill, 
judgment, and discretion ; neither overlooking nor under- 
valuing the more abstruse. and intricate subjects of study, 
but keeping them subordinate to the great object, which all 
who enter the " liberal professions " must regard as their 
chief aim — fit preparation for practical labor. Let what 
may have been, or will be, said, it is beyond dispute, that 
professional men, here, must be able and willing workers, 
or be content with scanty success ; whether in its grosser 
form of material reward, or the not less covetable bestowal 
of name and fame. The claim to popular favor must first 
be presented in the ability to do ; that acknowledged and 
accepted, ready recognition of being knoioer, as well as doer^ 
soon follows, and position is assured. Practical ability once 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

admitted, the supports on which this ability rests, are re- 
vealed. As pretension witjiout ability soon exhausts itself, 
so ability based on knowledge is enlarged and confirmed, 
its services sought, appreciated, and rewarded, and the 
successful application of the art, wins favor to the Science 
on which all Art depends. 

The course of instruction given in this school, corresponds 
with the opinions above avowed. Its object is to make men 
good practitioners of medical art, and to induce them to 
become diligent students of medical science. It embraces 
such- subjects as are usually selected for oral teaching, viz : 
the Principles and Practice of Medicine and Surgery, Anat- 
omy aiid Physiology, Chemistry, Obstetrics, Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics, and Practical Anatomy. 

The Infirmary wards furnish abundant opportunities for 
observing the various forms of acate and chronic disease. 
In the immediate neighborhood of the University, under the 
sole control of, and attended by the Faculty, it is scarcely 
possible that more favorable advantages can be offered for 
clinical study. To all matriculates its wards are open, 
throughout the year, without fee. 

• Practical Anatomy, a pursuit as essential to the student 
as the handling of the instruments of his craft to the arti- 
san's apprentice, and the period for which is pupilage, (since 
the practitioner seldom has time, inclination, or opportunity 
for it,) may be followed to any extent desired, the facilities 
being ample. No one, who cares to cultivate it, need fear 
lack of advantages. 

The University is also in possession of ample means for 
illustrating all its branches of instruction, and these are 
constantly employed. 

Examinations are held by the several Professors, on which 
all are invited and urged, though none are compelled, to 
attend. 

The Faculty have no wish to indulge in " self-approba- 
tion," or "local exaggeration." The Institution, with which 
they are identified, has existed half a century. Her alumni 



J 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. Y 

are spread chiefly over the South and South-west. In them 
she presents the hest vouchers for her character and posi- 
tion. To them the interests of " Alma Mater " are com- 
mended^ as desiring and deserving their good will and good 
works. 

a W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., Dean. 

Baltimore, March^ 1857. , 

-♦•••»•••••••• -•*^^«i#« 



HlW •••«».•♦.,.... ,^„.,„gf»^,f , .-^^ 












fl^»»**'*"" ar*..**... ...«• 



• .••.^•' 






^ 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES 



SESSIOKT 1856-57- 



■t^- i\ i d I i wj«j * L tmvjp 



-h- 



PRECEPTORS. 

Dr. Bull, 
Prof. Smith, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. Jamet, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof. Chew, 



(\ rl^lph'irj PbJIIjL 
MidMjf, A«lAtoJ«Bi»o 
Archinard, Samuel 
i^ksiiWic^ i ^, JoliJi J G i Q'rt 'VTrJ^ift 
SivQaJ j;.;w JLr\T/^,p hi<tt . 

•Beall, Thomas J. 

^B i Qiakf ViUn M^ i^i I l i i n'lJU ff ^ ' Ji^i'iw^. Prof. Dunbar, 

Boone, James Henry 
■ Bwv ' dl ' L ^' WrriialU Jjmwjl 



Prof. Miltenberger, 



Dr. McLaughlin, 
Dr. Large, 
Dr. Carroll, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof, ^iltenberger, 



4- 



Li i i!i i t'kpj « J ' am ' <^^ * I'L i !i ' Ll T ifu« i 

g.mi i LLi, ' J ij ]iii ' (i i / 'jr. 
ChL^i.1; Sainuijl'(jjf 
Clarke, Charles 
^M-ii'ilL^S'UU'f^uBEniv ]\I. '■]§)# 
€ . e@ko, ' JumLvP . 
gm'lgra ' ny AlcxLinTlli "M y 
^iiem,pitnnijBJiji.ii-[ili«TiL'l']rii Dr. Clagett, 
Dare, George H. Prof. Dunbar, 

^wiliin c ; II J u li'il'*yP Dr. Parker, 

Dawson, Philip, Jr. Dr. Carter, 

B i iiofliii ^" AJ c^i i g i iwl 01 Wl i i i filN ii i ^ P ro F. Miltenberger, 
e ww i ' cyr^^^ffi Dr. Graff, 



Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Uni. Maryland, 1854, 
Dr. Cooke, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Nassau, N. P. 

Louisiana. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. .■ 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland.. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Indiana. 






CATALOGUE OP MATRICULATES. 



Downes, Charles Farr 
Duncan, Charles R. 
B ph i nii Lf ■ T h o nm caD i iunc vi^ cy y 
Ippfcu i 1 1 J. ■ ■ W 'f\ I ' i a i !iEi < J<i ' ( i ) ' l g u n ' ,^ i iii » 

Farrar, Isaac, Jr. 
Favorite, John 
filiQ i r i iii i i i ng, Piob ' C fi t 
Foard, Andrew Jackson 
fi y u k'l * ■ J ' ci ' iif ir^ " (a) ^w* l M ' 
Fowler, Edward, Jr. 
French, John Lynch 

Go ' ld ' 3bo rough, John r 

Gray, Samuel 

ft riffith; Goorgo Riggs 

Q^wynn^ William ' Ilem y 

Harker, Richard M. J. 

Ha ' i ' lu), Ju1 ' lii ' II ' aiiJ<»tt 

Harris, Chapman B. 

Hays, Archer 

HQy» ' e ' 3',"Goorgr' ,, Wn'?hingtO'R' ' 

Haynes, Thomas J. 

JJ . oathyFi «» ^^i i A**' 
^ t toi fil i orc ai l > i ; J^Ji a d i J ^l 

Hoiton, T. Smith 
ki^ tfi i ii | ii l i i ii I II I J W n i ^Wa ' P i liW i ugtuii 

Hull, Joseph Janney 

Hume, Edward Horatio 
■K H«i i i i Ti^ . r'rj Willia ' uj*^¥ . 

4gh»hartj Oshnr - ft Spri «' ^ 

Jones, William Henry 

t ftf^l . -in i j ( Mi linrlt ' 3 » Hc ' ii ' i*jf » 

jg i rdau^ Ra)b)OPt * Mt ' iluij,"M. M 

Justice, Joseph C. 
^ Kootc^ John J l^ 



PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCB. 

Dr. Lawton, ^iiiJ^i'iwm^ ••••» 

Dr. Bowling, .^^AlaJDa-m-av*- - 

Un i V ers i ty«*¥'i^iW'ay-...Uij;gijtij^^., . », , 
Drs. Smith & Evansi5».^U-r.yJ«iB4^— . 
Dr. Elliott, ••••••^i^-JVLafiyiaj^^.*.... 

Dr. Tull,#M ^.... M.*fesa.di.u^Us^, 

•Dr. Zimmerman, Maryland. 
Dr. Mason, «H..^^]:gijiiA.v....- ■ 

Dr. Bromwell<^.*««*«.»Mai;yJ^4.»^i« 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Dr. Fowler^.,,.,^^....M^t.)da.iiir,,„i 
Dr. Coop«i5^»^.,^^^..J^ij:^«ia«««*w,« 
Prof. Dunbar, .|i#,#.#-^ir,g.i-ftiai*i.««t» 
Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Dr. Warfield, ••«»»Mi»WVLM«y»l'aH4i*— •« 
Dr. Stansbury, t#*M*ssi&s*pp'it*» 
Baltimore Infiri^^3«5**M>ar'yle«cl^«#»^» 
Prof. Dunbanjfc-** '—• MaxyJ,9J«JM.,M 
Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. Harris, Vi.#.^,„^]Vlaj;y,laiiwii-«-* 
Prof. Smith, ^^^^Mmy^rtf^^K***** 
'Baltint^f^-IttfiriBAr.y^^.likfii'&S'i-p^K'-* 
Baltimore«ff?fiT'fiawpy»f 'rMis«ik(&i:p^»««« 

• •-Ma-ryhTTd'.v.. 

Prof. Miltenberger^^^PffiTfSylV^V.** . 
Dr. Hoiton, * ••-•.-M-aTyland.'"'^ 
Dr. Hopkins,«*»-"»'*"-A-feiiyl^W1'.**«''« ^ 
Dr. Johnston, ••••••M^pyl-awtl^'^"' 

Dr. Laidlaw,"«»-"» •Af^'Fgfn4«%..«»»** • 

Dr. Blount^"^'**"«<Je©r^ia:^— "••^ 

Dr. Claude, »- Maryhm-dv—* • . 

Dr. Rasin, •^•'•♦•Miaiwf4mfd'."*'" 

Prof. Sjj^ij;^ ..•••••MJWiiBigiiiwft**''-*-- 

Uni. Maryland,-! 8§35-A^fiwTan»^'*' 
Dr. West, Virginia. 

Prof. Chew, •••M'ai»y+mid •.•-•• 



r 



10 



CATALOGUE OP MATRICULATES. 



-h 



PIIECEPTORS. 



RESIDENCE. 



liTifB n n.Hiiy 1.; n T P^m M'Mf e'M 

K ii Q o i h ' l ' i » n ' g ««« G h ft I' l l o c J > M i Li < ft ii 
Knight, Cornelius S. 



Laney, William Housel 
Iffliiifcr^niO) ny "^^i'ngiilaftliTiiil^ia 

€i 9cy(i? . k i Qil i co t^ f Dlo w i' 
Lee, Charles Carroll 

fe^tfi * " j'a iiiL ' j.^y riiw»i 

Macgill, William D. 

1¥lNl(»'.»11iiiililiji„^>]|liilT>»jlf<lf.: 

■ M u. G;mii) i yrLlLi ' J., M. ' W 
Mtf &mvr'D [ii i t' a¥ 4>e-snty 

%J,^ M i' lli g ffl!t f ill, ' EQ V T mrHP . 
•J^ Mmt Hi III ii^.^1 ," fekrl ^ WL 

Muig ' cfli j j E>tW"iLf eiin ' Lgn 

J l I i ft ' l ' lUiiy i l l LMKi ^ yi lll ' lfl 

M^4in 8' l ' J *> l l ^^#lt i um"ChQ ' pl > ec 
Offutt, Baruch 



Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 
Dr. Gibbons, Maryland. 

Dr. Bush';--'* •-'•••D^jnT«^."»^ 

Prof, ©-ftflftttf; ••--- ••-MSrylTn'd'.-'- 
Baltimore Infirmary, I\ftl^;y't?^lifd■.•"•*•• 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. Murphy, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, •" VirgtnYav*—" 

Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 
Prof. Dunbar, •^••••••l^rarfran'd';'**' 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, Virginia. 
Dr. McSherry,"" •M«iky4antlr*'** 

Dr. Frick, * Maryland". ' ' 

Dr. Bull, Virginia. 

Prof. Dunbar^ Maryland. ' 

Dr. Free, *• ' -Pennsylva'a: 

Maryland. 
Prof. Miltenberger," 'iMaf^TariaV' " 
Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Prof. Dunbar, Maryland. 

D r. Cnne, • • -Ptsti it^l v a' a .' 

Uni. Maryland, 1856, Maryland. 
Prof. Smith, "' '^ ^^^T •¥f)?k:- • • • 



Dr. McKee,^*""» ^ferfl-awdiJl^l 

Dr. McSherry, Maryland. 

Prof. Smitiiv-'***"'"^ Marykird:*"' 
Prof. Chew, Virginia. 

Dr. Monmonier, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberg?j?7"-Maryfen<t}»'- 
Dr. JohnstcJfi,"' ' Guayaquil." * 

Dr. Claude, Maryland. 

Dr. Nevitt, ^'*"'"^"'Yrfgimtt:"***' 
Baltii*te'lTl1irftl&!yr'^*^buma; ■ •'••• 
Prof. Smith, Maryland. 

Dr. Orrick, #Myi7larnd.-»- 



i 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



11 



NAMES. 

Osborn, William H. 
Owens, Thomas 



PRECEPTORS. 



^ 



- I - L., M. D T* 



^ 



PntTJulc^ F...JL. 
B e achj Johi y 
JBi eircg) . ^^Jiao w H i iolgQ i 



BfJQ/.'; J?(jiijaiiiiii F'i'ffi'J'k'Kfi 
Reutter, George N. 



Rogers, Samuel Jones 
S^a i rb i orfi; Sila ' C 
& >»tuir, ' ^VilliQm Thomas 
S ' Oetit ; «Homy ' G)hatn i1 ^ 
■ ShrGvo y (B ii l jP Hi i lLJ * W . 
Simmons, Patrick Henry 
4i <M i i i th I 1 *1 1 90 tt ■ Ik ' i'iTa ' ii' d 
Smith, Richard Silas 
O^iiii i n L ■ ^ T iiiP^wfffsHWP*^ 
Slater, Leonard A. 
StM»].in.ai^T^.,TTnnT»f 

& t t»U U 1 t ^ J cl ' liJT, ' J3 " I ' I L M«tiy 

Ste . vonG^ ' J ' ohn - II ' C ' n ' yy 
SiiUIiiViiiini^tfBorgo R. 
S i U i H i J i O rl i n n d i > « W 11 1 i tU LJ li fcl 
Taylor, John 
T ay 1 ' P^ M aym ■ S itl (X 
Tebauli, A. George 
"Ww jmp.Ton, Joseph .. Fop^ ' 
»i>ui . l . t| Dm - i ' d ' J . i.i i iiituu Qdt ^ 
^i am}n i i l i l if^ iBiiiiJ ii lph i 
V< o<i i E ' f i »luor; . Frederick 
V e dtch, Eldi'idgC"R ' ()bGPt6^ « J r. 
Waddill, R. E. 
Wagner, Clinfon 



Dr. Richardsdli^"-"-«.Maw^land.,, 
Prof. Dunbar, •^♦.^lai^land^* . 
Uni. Maryland, 1854, Virginia. 
Dr. Monkur^ •♦ -••• • . M~a*y.land„ ,- 

Dr. Peafih.«, ,. • #Maj;yJ.aji)J,, .. 

Dr. Sudler, •- ^aryl,^;;!^.. •• 

Dr. Maccubbin, •. Macy.land. 

Dr. Mit.Qliell^ ^__,^.M&x.yla;nfit»r 

Dr. Jojinson,^^, .yi';giP*^''-^ 

Dr. Bri)^a,** .^^^^jiml^- 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 
Dr. Lowndes. Maryland. 

Dr. Warner, Maryland. 

Dr. Reed, Maryland. 

Prof. Chew, Maryland. 

Prof. Miltenberger, Maryland. 
Dr. Winslow, N. Carolina. 

University Virginia, Virginia. 



Dr. Upton, 
Dr. Denny, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. Wilson, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. Elliott, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. Robertson, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Dr. Tebault, 
Dr. Bogan, 
Dr. McKew, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Dr. Van Bibber, 
Dr. Scott, 
Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 



Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Marylaid. 

Maryland. 

Poland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 



12 



CATALOGUE OP MATRICULATES. 



We tttz, Geu i ^e 

Wi']fam,'^i,;,ilnn( ■■*!"* 
WiHiard/john T o 

WW'tir i j^'j ^'^^ ■ ^nd i i T^^^^'^^p 



PRECEPTORS. 

Prof. Dunbar, 
Prof. Chew, 

Prof. Dunbar, 

Prof. Chew, •' ' 
Prof. Chew, *• • 
Dr. DasHMd,'"- 
Dr. Zimm^ttmfh',- 
Dr. Dulin, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 
"•' Maryla'hd.' 
•-Maryland. 
•Englan'd'.—* 
— 'MarylaTid:-' 

Mary^'M:'* 

Marylaird".* 
• "Miarylarrd. 

Maryland. 



'•«».••■•• I 



••••««l^f 4t 



-»t«^»»*»»» 



• •■ 










•••• 


.•«••- 


.«-. 


-••« 


,.*•'• 


.^.-... 


...^» 






•>( 


•••»M«i 


44^**... 


•••4 




.(.-.. 







- - 


.•/» 








f 






4 













GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held March bth, 1856, the following Can- 
didates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



Edwin Eagle Atkinson, 
Joseph Abeil Baden, 
Philip Daniel Barber, 
William Janney Best, . 
Solomon Betts, Jr., . 
Joseph Henry Blandford, 
George W. Bowlen, . 
George Gaston Brewer, . 
Alexander Mortimer Brooke, 
William Henry Bruce, . 
William Cowan Carson, ,. 
Silas Marean Chatard, /"V'it 
Benjamin Franklin Clagett, 
Joseph Loyal Cowles, 
John Cronmiller_, Jr., 
Francis McCauly Davis, 
William Hamilton Dawson, 
Albert Harrison Dickinson, 
Kobert Welsh Dorsey, 
Stratton Bayley Downing, 
James James Duke, . 
Jose Kaphael Espin, 
Oliver Troxel Everhart^ 
William Teakle Fisher, 
Erasmus Garrott, 
George S. Gibson, . 
William Ellis Glenn, 
John Edward Hally . 



//i 



^1^ 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Georgia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Cuba. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 



14 



GRADUATES. 



RESIDENCE. 



Alexander Duvall Hamilton, 

Chapman Harris, . 

William Dawkins Hellen, 

William Edwin Hodges, 

Eugene Hodson, 

David Thomas Iglehart, 

John Fielder Ireland, 

Thomas Martin Jordan, 

Thomas Attaway Eeeder Keech, 

John Dodson Kemp, 

Booth Kennedy, 

Charles Washington Griffith Macgill 

Thomas Bobbins Mapp, 

Lawrence James Augustine McCauley, 

Peter Joseph McGary, 

James Marcellus Mudd, 

Samuel Alexander Mudd, . 

Charles Edward Nickerson, . 

William Henry Norfolk, . 

Lewis Lawrence Ppllock, 

Henry Clay Kogers, . 

Ashbury Sutton Sappington^ 

Walton, Saunders, 

Otho Francis Scheldt, 

Theodore Adam Shower, . 

John Sparrow Smith, 

Joseph Wesley Steele, 

John Stump Stites, 

Abraham S. Stonebraker, . 

Philip Francis Thomas, Jr., . 

James Thomas Thompson, 

Washington Greene Tuck, 

Philip Skinner Wales, 

Philip Montague Williams, . 

Thomas Hart Benton Williams, 

Robert Taylor Wilson, . 



<f 



. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Pennsylv'a. 
. Maryland. 

Ohio. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Virginia. 

Maryland. 
. Virginia. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

S. Carolina. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Virginia. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Maryland. 
. Maryland. 

Virginia. 
. Mississippi. 

Virginia. 



GRADUATES. 



15 



At the Annual Cormrnncement held March 1th, 1857, the following Can- 
didates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



Alfred Fine Alday, 
John Cartwriglit Aslicom, 
Uriah Haynes Billingslea, 
Andrew Duberson Birch, 
William James Bowdle, 
James Hamner Butler, 
Alexander Warfield Dorsey^ 
Thomas Dunaway Eubank, . 
William Jackson Evans, 
John Ewing, 
Kobert Fleming, . 
James Carter Fowler, 
John Goldsborough, 
George Biggs Griffith, 
William Henry Gwynn, 
John Hanson Harley, 
George Washington Haynes, 
Osborn Sprigg Iglehart, 
Charles Henry Jordan, . 
Joseph Mitchell Kennard, . 
Samuel Gore Kinzer_, 
Charles William Koechling, 
Colin Hunter Lambert, . 
Virgil Clarke Lawrence, 
George Perry Leatherbury, 
John Kyrle McCulloh, 
James Henderson McDowell, 
Bernard Carty McGuire, 
Reuben Hanson Moore, . 
De Witt Clinton Morgan, . 
James Arthur Mullan, . 
Napoleon Bonaparte Nevitt, 
William Charles Nichols, 



Nassau, N. P. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mississippi. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mississippi. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

New York. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Alabama. 



16 



GRADUATES, 



John Henry Orrick^ 
Elias Hicks Peirce_, 
Benjamin Franklin Price, 
Kobert Franklin Price, 
Silas Scarboro, 
William Thomas Scarff, 
Henry Chatard Scott, 
Scott Bernard Smith, 
James Henry Steuart, 
John Henry Stevens, 
Major Sitler Taylor, 
Joseph Ford Thompson, 
David James Odell Truitt, 
Kudolph Vampill, ^ 

Frederick Van Bibber, 
Eldridge Koberts Yeitch, Jr._, 
Alfred Howard Whiteford, 
James Andrew Jackson Willing, 
George Michael Zimmerman, 
William Henry Zollickoffer^ 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Poland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

England. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next session will begin on Thursday, the 8tli of Octo- 
ber, 1857, and close on the 1st of March, 1858. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each. Practical 
xinatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in tlie Infirmary us clinical assistants. The fee is one hundred 
dollars per year, payable in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Fa- 
culty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of his 



18 FEES, STATUTES, fiTC. 



7 --^"--— > 



w 



own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 
school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desire it; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the 
result of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. 



I^Efig, STATUTES, ETC. 19 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons^ except Physicians and 
Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W, Miltenberger, Dean. 

j2S§* Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, toho may be found at his house on the University 
grounds, will direct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The ex- 
penses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country — good board 
being obtained at from $3 to $4 per week. 



TEXT BOOKS 



The Faculty recommend the following text books : 
Anatomy and Physiology — Quain and Sharpey, Wilson's 
Anatomy, Carpenter's, Kirkes and Paget's Physiology. 

SuRGEHY — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes's 
nVipmistrv. G-raham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 

icy 

Women and Children — Ca- 
Ivvifery ; West's, Evanson's, 

Principles and Practice of Medicine — Watson's Lectures, 
Williams on Diseases of the Chest, Latham on the Heart, 
Barlow's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pathology — Pereira's 
Materia Medica, Wood and Bache's Dispensatory, Paget's 
Surgical Pathology, Wood's Therapeutics. 



5?B 



THE 



B ALTIMOBE INFIEMARY 




is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended hy the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed hy the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently 
been erected, containing commodious private apartments sepa- 
rate from the more public portion of the house. Persons from a 
distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find 
the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the 
accommodations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. W. 0. Nichols, 
Resident Physician. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



F 1 F T Y - F I K S T 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



O F 1 H K 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 










SESSION 1858-'5 9. 



BALTIMORK: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 

MDCCCLVIII. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIFTY-FIRST 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 



SESSION 1858-59, 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES 



SESSIOlSr 1857-58- 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD k CO. 



II D C C C L V I I I . 



UNIYEKSITY OF MAKYLAiND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Phovost. , 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 
NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OP THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

JOSEPH ROBY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHpiOLOGY. 

RICHARD H. THOMAS, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS, AND PATHOLOGY. 



BERWICK B. SMITH, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

DEAN. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

JAMES HAMNER BUTLER, M. D Resident Physician. 

Sister ANN DE SALES Sister Superior. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 

JAMES PHILIP COOKB. JOSE ARISTIDES MORLA. 

ARCHER HAYS. WILLIAM HENRY NT:WELL. 

CHARLES BOROMEO HENDERSON. JAMES ROBERT EMORY PERRIE. 

NATHANIEL GARLAND KEIRLE. CHARLES WILLIAM SHREVE. 

HENRY FENELON McSHERRY. HENRY YOUNG WEEMS. ^ I 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 



The fifty-first session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland, will commence on Thursday, the 
7th of October, 1858, and end on the first of March, 1859. 

In their Annual Circular, the Faculty desire to submit to 
their professional brethren, and to the public generally, as 
they have done on former occasions, a brief exposition of 
their views^ wishes and expectations, in the conduct of the 
Institution committed to their charge. 

Their design is to furnish such a course of instruction as 
they consider best adapted to be useful to those who are 
preparing to enter upon the duties of the Medical Profession. 
In order to accomplish this object, their lessons consist prin- 
cipally of a review of the elementary facts of the Science of 
Medicine, and of the obvious and admitted doctrines and 
precepts derived from those facts. They bestow no time or 
attention upon fanciful theories, speculations, and conjectures^ 
the opinionum commenta, which may be true or may be false. 
Such subjects are selected as are deemed of most importance 
from their practical utility, and the understanding of which 
will best serve to enlighten the pupil in his future exertions 
to extend the bound's of his professional acquirements. The 
paramount effort through every part of the course, is to give 
that kind and that measure of knowledge, and that training 
and discipline of mind, which will best qualify the young 
physician to commence with safety the treatment of diseases, 
and will also best prepare him to derive from his own obser- 
vation and experience the clinical skill and sagacity which 
in their highest degree can never be learned from teachers. 
The important truth is recognized and ever kept in view, 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

that the most valuable portion of all preliminary education is 
that which prepares the pupil to become his own instructor. 

In addition to their course of lectures, and as subsidiary to 
that course, the Faculty are in the habit of holding during 
the session weekly examinations in their respective depart- 
ments, which the students are advised, though not required, 
to attend. The utility of these examinations is abundantly 
manifest. They serve as a thorough and exact review of the 
subjects which have been recently discussed. They afford 
opportunities for rectifying any errors or misapprehensions 
which may have occurred to the pupil while listening, or 
while neglecting to listen, to the lecture. And they also 
stimulate the student to increased attention and exertion. 
The facts and doctrines of the lectures become more interest- 
ing to him when he knows that his acquaintance with them 
will speedily be subjected to a public test. A spirit of emu- 
lation is thus diffused through the class, and all are more or 
less benefited who are capable of deriving pleasure from the 
manifestation of knowledge, or of feeling shame from the 
exposure of ignorance. 

The lessons given in the several departments are aided by 
ample means for illustrations. These consist of a collection 
of Anatomical, Surgical, Pathological and Obstetrical draw- 
ings, casts, models, and preparations, with a cabinet of Spe- 
cimens of the Materia Medica, and a complete Chemical Ap- 
paratus. 

For the purpose of Clinical instruction, the School enjoys 
the inestimable advantage of possessing a capacious hospital 
of its own. The Baltimore Infirmary, in the immediate 
vicinity of the College, has been greatly enlarged by the 
present Faculty, and is under their sole charge and control. 
This institution contains a hundred and fifty beds, and re- 
ceives into its wards every variety of acute and chronic dis- 
eases, thus furnishing an abundant and never-failing sup- 
ply of cases for clinical study. During the sessions daily in- 
struction is given at the bed-sides by the Professors of Sur- 
gery and of the Principles and Practice of Medicine ; and this 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

system of teaching is continued through the remainder of the 
5^ear by other members of the Faculty, for the benefit of all 
matriculates of the School who choose to attend. Of the 
utility and indeed indispensable necessity of clinical training 
as a part of medical education, the Faculty are thoroughly 
aware. They furnish it without charge; they advise and 
exhort their pupils to frequent the wards, and observe for 
themselves the character and treatment of diseases ; and they 
admit no candidate for graduation to examination unless he 
produce evidence of his attendance at the hospital. 

The facilities afforded by the School for the study of Prac- 
tical Anatomy are all that the most diligent and zealous 
student can desire. Anatomical subjects are supplied in 
abundance, and at moderate expense. The rooms are open 
from the beginning of October; and, as they are lighted with 
gas, dissection can be pursued in the evening as well as 
during the day. 

The instruction given in the lectures and examinations, and 
in the wards of the hospital, constitutes an important part, 
but yet onhj a part , of medical education. Much in addition 
must be done for the student by his private preceptor, and 
much must be done by himself. He must read diligently, 
and with judicious selection of books; and he must learn to 
reflect and meditate on what he reads, and hears, and sees. 
He must learn to assist himself, or he can never be effectually 
assisted by others. Mental power and culture cannot be im- 
parted by pouring knowledge into vacant and inactive minds. 
The mind that cannot or will not think, can never be im- 
proved by being made the passive recipient of the thoughts 
of others. The results of medical education depend not 
barely upon the quantity and quality of the instruction given, 
and the ability of the instructors who give it, but also, and 
in a much larger measure, upon the character of the pupils — 
what they are by nature, and what they have been made by 
the training, good or evil, to which they were subjected be- 
fore they entered the halls of a Medical School. Of those 
who resort to Medical Schools some are qualified by natural 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

abilities and by preliminary education to be far more easily, 
more rapidly, and more highly improved than others. But 
there are few or none who may not, by diligent and perse- 
vering study, and by exerting" to the utmost such talents as 
they possess, obtain a degree of intelligence and knowledge 
which will give them the right to expect success in life, by 
giving them the power to be useful to the community. 
Where failure in the quest of medical knowledge is signal 
and entire, it may be ascribed in almost all cases rather to 
the fault or misfortune of the pupil than to the neglect or 
incapacity of his teachers. 

Diligence and industry on the part of pupils cannot be 
enforced by medical teachers. The age and position of 
Students of Medicine prohibit the employment of compulsory 
means. The Medical Faculty of the University of Maryland 
endeavor to exert over the young gentlemen intrusted to 
their care a friendly and salutary influence, not only in re- 
lation to their professional studies, but also as respects their 
moral character. They require regular attendance, atten- 
tion, and decorum in the lecture rooms; they ascertain by 
frequent examinations the industry and proficiency of each 
member of the class ; and they announce in their statutes that 
after the final examination of each candidate for graduation, 
the result of his case is determined by reference to his moral 
as well as his intellectual qualifications, — by regard to what 
he is, as well as to what he knows. 

The Faculty endeavor to be mindful on all occasions of 
their obligations to the Medical Profession, to their pupils, 
and to the community. They seek to promote the best in- 
terests of the Profession, and to maintain its ancient respect- 
ability and dignity, by exerting their utmost ability to im- 
prove the intellect and elevate the sentiments of the young 
cadets who are entering its ranks. And they desire to render 
good service to the commonweal, by doing their part in so 
educating the rising generation of physicians as will qualify 
them to perform usefully, benevolently and honorably, the 
duties of their vocation. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 9 

In relation to themselves, the Faculty may he allowed to 
refer to the diligence and industry which they have exerted 
in the pursuit of their business as teachers of medicine — 
humble merits which will he acknowledged and attested by 
all who have been their pupils. They purpose to continue 
their efforts with unabated energy ; and there is nothing that 
gives them more encouragement in their labors than to ob- 
serve the well-earned success and reputation of a large pro- 
portion of the large number of physicians who have been 
educated under their care. To them, and to all the Alumni 
of the School, they pledge themselves to use all proper means 
for advancing the reputation and extending the usefulness of 
their Alma Mater. 

G. W. MiLTENBERQER, Dean. 

Baltimore, February 15^, 1858. 



Catalogiu of p;atric«Iatt$, 



SESSIOX<r 1857-58. 



NAMES. 

Adams, Wm. S. 
Adler, Lewis 
Adolphus, Philip 
Bageley, Joseph H. 
Baxlej, Claude, 
Beckenbaugh, J. J. 
Best, J. W. Fletcher 
Boone, James H. 
Brogden, Arthur 
Brooke, B. S. 
Brothers, II . Sumpter 
Brown, James M. 
Butler, John Joseph 
Byrne, Charles C. 
Carter, John C. 
Cauthorn, A. Hart 
Chew, Samuel C. 
Clarke, Charles 
Clarke, James M., M. D, 
Clendinen, Alexander 
Cooke, James P. 
Cooke, Theodore 
Cochran, John Henry 
Corkran, Alexander 
Crampton, Joseph Kellar 
Crause, John L. 
Crawford, James J. 
Currey, J. H. 
Dare, George H. 
Dawkins, J. Thomas 



PRECEPTORS. 

Dr. E. C. Atkinson, 
Dr. B. H. D. Bull, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. H. W. Baxley, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Balto. Med. Institute, 
Dr. T. Y, Jones, 
Balto. Med. Institute, 
Prof. Miltenberger, 
Dr. McSherry, 
Balto. Med. Institute, 

Prof. Chew, 

Prof. Miltenberger, 

Dr. A. Clendinen, 

Balto. Infirmary, 

Balto. Med. Institute, 

Dr. S. E. Treadwell, 

Dr. Noble, 

Prof. Miltenberger, 

Dr. J. M. Geyer, 

Balto. Med. Institute, 

Dr. Krozer, 

Balto. Med. Institute, 

Prof. Chew & Dr. Parker, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Mar J- land. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Florida. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

A'^irginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



11 



Dodson, Robert A. 


Dr. Nich. Pindell, 


Maryland. 


Downey, William Astley 


Dr. E. G. Cox, 


Indiana. 


Doyle, Fred. C. 


Dr. Scott, 


Maryland. 


Dulaney, William H. 


Dr. Thos. H. Crane, 


Maryland. 


Duvall, P. B. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Eastman, Lewis M. 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Maryland. 


Edelen, H. C. 


Dr. Gough, 


Maryland. 


Eversfield, John Thomas 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Ewell, Dan'l F. 




Maryland . 


Favorite, John 


Dr. Zimmerman, 


Maryland. 


Fowler, Edward, Jr. 


Dr. Fowler, 


Maryland. 


Gibson, John St. Pierre 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Virginia. 


Glacken, Michael 


Prof. Smith & Dr. Glacken 


, Maryland. 


Gray, Samuel 


Dr. Warfield, 


Maryland. 


Green, Richard H. 


Dr. Jno. Ridout, 


Maryland. 


Gwynn, Wm H., M. D. 


Univ. of Md., 1857, 


Maryland . 


Hanna, George Smith 


Dr. J. J. Moran, 


Maryland. 


Barker, Richard M, J. 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Maryland. 


Hays, Archer 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Fleath, F W. 




Marjdand. 


Helsby, Thomas H. 




Maryland. 


Henderson, Charles B. 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Hillary, W. M. 


(Prof. Chew and Drs. 
1 Osbourne & Scott, 


Maryland. 


Hodgkin, Alex. B. 


Prof. Chew and Drs. 
Osbourne & Scott, 


Maryland. 


Hopkins, Ephraim, Jr. 


Dr. Hopkins, 


Maryland. 


Hopkins, Wm. Worthing! 


on Dr. Hopkins, 


Maryland. 


Hunter, Wm. A. 


Prof. Chew, 


Georgia. 


Johnston, Eugene 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Virginia. 


Keets, John P. 


Prof. Chew and Dr. Neale 


Maryland. 


Keirle, Nathaniel G. 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Kemp, Joshua S. 


Dr. J. L. Gibbons, 


Maryland. 


Kerr, Robert J. 


Balto. Med. Institute. 


Maryland. 


Knight, Cornelius S. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Lacy, John B. 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Virginia. 


Landrum, R. T. 


Dr. W. B. Rose, 


Kentucky 


Laney, William Hansel 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Maryland. 


Lee, Charles A. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland 


Lee, Richard Currie 


Dr. B. H. D. Bull, 


Virginia. 



12 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



Leach, C. H. 


Dr. J. W. Leach, 


Virgmia. 


Linthicum, J. Garrott 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Maryland. 


Lodge, W. Jacob 


Dr. McNeal, 


Pennsylv'nia.^ 


Lowe, James Alfred 


Dr. J. L. Free, 


Pennsylv'nia. 


Magill, Chas. a.W.,M. D 


Univ. of Md. 


Maryland. 


Magruder, G. W. 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Virginia. 


McComas, Josiali Lee 


Balto. Alms House, 


Maryland. 


McCuUoh, J. H., M.D. 


Univ. of Md., 1857, 


Maryland. 


McKee, C. E. S. 


Dr. McKee, 


Maryland. 


McSheny, Henry F. 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Virginia. 


Mechem, A. F. 


Dr. R. Mechem, 


Maryland. 


Milbolland, Edward F. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Monmonier, Jno. N. K. 


Dr. Monmonier, 


Maryland. 


Moore, Reuben H., M.D. 


Univ. of Md., 1857, 


Virginia. 


Morla, Jose Aristides 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Guyaquil. 


Morrison, James M. 


Dr. F. E. B. Hintze, 


Maryland. 


Newell, W.H. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Oliver, Joseph L. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Osborn, Wm. H. 


Dr. E.. H.Richardson, 


Maryland. 


Owens, J. R. 


Prof. Chew and Dr. Owens, Maryland. 


Owens, Thomas 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Maryland. 


wings, Harvey "VV. 


Dr. Owings, 


Maryland. 


Pacetty, J. Anthony 


Prof. Smith, 


Florida. 


Parran, Wm. S., M.D., 


Winch'r Med. Col., 1856, 


Virginia. 


Patrick, Thomas L. 


Dr. Monkur, 


Maryland. 


Peach, John 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Perrie, James R. E. 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Perry, V. L. 


Drs. Smith & Ohr, 


Maryland. 


Quinn, J. Schoofield 


Dr. McMaster, 


Maryland. 


Reeves, J. R. T. 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Reutter, George N. 


Dr J. D. Brooks, 


Pennsylv'nia. 


Ricketts, David F. 


Dr. J. R. Muller, 


Maryland. 


Robins, Wm. H. 


Drs. Jones & Cary, 


Virginia. 


Robinson, Robert K. 


Dr. J. Dixon, 


Maryland. 


Robosson, T. P. 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Roman, Philip Dixon 


Prof. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Scarff, Wm. Thomas, M. D 


Univ. of Md., 1857, 


Maryland. 


Scott, Henry C, M. D. 


Univ. of Md., 1857, 


Maryland. 


Shreve, Charles W. 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Skinner, Thomas E 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



13 



Smith, B. Lecompte 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


Maryland. 


Southerland, Silas B. 




Maryland. 


Stevens, J. H., M. D. 


Univ. of Md., 1857, 


Maryland. 


Stenson, J. Fenwick 


Dr. McSherry, 


Maryland. 


Stirling, E. H. 


Dr. Wilson, 


Maryland. 


Sullivan, George R. 


Dr. Elliott, 


Maryland. 


Sunderland, Wm. H. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Thomas, Philip F., M. D. 


Univ. of Md., 1856, 


Maryland. 


Virdin, W. W. Jr. 


Balto. Med. Institute, 


N. Carolina. 


Wagner, Clinton 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Walter, Charles, M. D. 


Univ. of Md., 


Maryland. 


Waters, James K. 




Maryland. 


Waters, Somerset R., of R. 


, Balto. Med. Institute, 


Maryland. 


Weems, H. Y. 


Balto. Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Welling, William W. 


J Prof. Chew and 
\ Dr. W. Watkins, 


Maryland. 


Wells, Benjamin F. 


Dr. Magruder, 


Maryland. 


Wentz, George 


Prof. Miltenberger, 


Maryland. 


Wheeden, Thomas F. 


r Prof. Dunbar and 
I Dr. Dashiell, 


Maryland. 


Williard, J. T. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Williams, James T. 


Prof. Chew, 


Maryland. 


Wilson, C. Irving 


Dr. Smoot, 


Wash.,D.C 



GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held March 1th, 1857^ the following Can- 
didates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 

NAMES. RESIDENCE. 

Alfred Fine AldayY. Nassau, N. P. 

John Cartwright Ashcom/^ Maryland. 

Uriah Haynes Billingslea .»'. Maryland. 

Andrew Duberson Birchn Maryland. 

William James Bowdle. K Maryland. 

James Hamner Butler.K Maryland. 

Alexander Warfield Dorsey .^ Maryland . 

Thomas Dunaway Eubank. K Virginia. 

William Jackson Evans. K Maryland. 

John Ewing .x Maryland. 

Robert Fleming .v Virginia. 

James Carter Fowler. '/. Maryland . 

John Goldsborough.i Maryland. 

George Biggs Griffith.^ Mississippi. 

William Henry G wynn v. Maryland. 

John Hanson Harley . i Maryland. 

George Washington Haynes. i Mississippi. 

Osborn Sprigg Iglehart. \ Maryland. 

Oharles Henry Jordan .V Virginia. 

Joseph Mitchell Kennard.l^ Delaware . 

Samuel Gore Kinzer. .\ Maryland . 

Charles William Koechling.y Maryland. 

Colin Hunter Lambert. i Maryland. 

Virgil Clarke Lawrence. I Maryland. 

George Perry Leatherbury .\ , , . , , Virginia. 

John Kyrle McCulloh.'v... Maryland. 

James Henderson McDowell.* Pennsylvania. 

Bernard Carty McGuire..'* New York. 

Reuben Hanson Moore .\ Virginia. 

De Witt Clinton Morgan., Maryland. 

James Arthur Mullan.\ Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 15 

Napoleon Bonaparte Nevitt.KT Virginia. 

William Charles Nichols.*<^. Alabama. 

John Henry Orrick .^. Maryland . 

Elias Hicks Peirce./f. Maryland. 

Benjamin Franklin Price.iK Maryland. 

Robert Franklin Price . K Virginia . 

Silas Scarboro. i^ . . . . , Maryland. 

William Thomas Scarflf.K. Maryland. 

Henry Chatard Scott K'. Maryland. 

Scott Bernard Smith A'. Virginia. 

James Henry Steuart.K. Maryland. 

John Henry Stevens. K Maryland. 

Major Sitler Taylor. IT. Maryland. 

Joseph Ford Thompson./:! Maryland. 

David James Odell TruittK Maryland. 

Rudolph Vampill ..y. Poland . 

Frederick Van Bibber. 1 Virginia. 

Eldridge Roberts Veitch, Jr.^ Virginia. 

Alfred Howard Whiteford. J-. , England. 

James Andrew Jackson Willing. i Maryland. 

George Michael Zimmerman. .Ir; Maryland. 

William Henry Zollickoffer . \ Maryland, 



PEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next session will begin on Thursday, the 7th of Octo- 
ber, 1858, and close on the 1st of March, 1859. 

The Fees for attendance on lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prao- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each ; Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

!N"o charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Infirmary as clinical assistants. The fee is one hundred 
dollars per year, payable in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Fa- 
culty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of his 
own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 



FEES, STATUTES, ETC. 17 

school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desire it ; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the re- 
sult of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctl}^ understood 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation^ attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 
Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltenberger^ Dean. 



Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, who may be found at his house on the University 
grounds, will conduct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The 
expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country — good board be- 
ing obtained at from ^3 to ^4: per week. 



TEXT BOOKS 



The Faculty recommend the following text books : 

Anatomy and Physiology — Quain and Sharpey, Wilson's 
Anatomy, Carpenter's, Kirke's and Paget's Physiology. 

Surgery — Druitt's ^Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes's 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chemis- 
try, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases op Women and Children — Cazeaux's 
Churchill's, Rigby's Midwifery ; West's, Evanson's, Condie's 
Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine — Watson's Lectures, 
Williams on Diseases of the Chest, Latham on "the Heart, 
Barlow's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pathology — Pereira's 
Materia Medica, Wood and Bache's Dispensatory, Paget's 
Surgical Pathology, Wood's Therapeutics. 



THE 



BALTIMORE INFIEMARY 




j 



is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. Tlie 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Cliarity. An addition has recently 
been erected, containing commodious private apartments sepa- 
rate from the more public portion of the house. Persons from a 
distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find 
the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the f 
accommodations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. W. C. Nichols 
Resident Physician. 



iyM3^7ilF^Sa7^ ©f MA^l'Lihm® 



FIFTY-THIRD 



A^Nl^-UJ^L. CIRCULAR 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 




SESSIOINT I860 — '61. 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO. 

M D C C C L X . 






^ 









O 

ij^ 

S 













r:-i 



H ^ f r. f fl-' 




1^ 



^ -. 







UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIFTY-THIRD 



ANNIii CIieiliAR 



OF Til 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 



SESSION 1860-61, 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES, 



SESSIOnNT 1859-60- 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY S HER WOOD & CO 



M D C C CLX . 



TEXT BOOKS 



The Faculty recommend the following text books: 
Anatomy and Physiology — Quain and Sharpey, Wilson's 
Anatomy, Carpenter'Sj Kirke's and Paget's Physiology. 

Surgery — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes's 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chemis- 
try, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children — Cazeaux's 
Churcliill's, Righy's Midwifery; West's, Evanson's, Condie's 
Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine — Watson's Lectures, 
Williams on Diseases of the Chest, Latham on the Heart, 
Barlow's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics — Pereira's Materia Med- 
ica, Wood and Bache's Dispensatory, Wood's Therapeutics. 



< 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 
NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 

PllOFKSSOR OF SURGERY. 

WM. E. A. AIKEN, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 

SAMUEL CHEW, M.D., 

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, AND OF 
CLINICAL MEDICINE, 

JOSEPH PtOBY, M. D., 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN. 

CHARLES FRICK, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 

WM. A. HAMMOND, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 



G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

DEAN. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 



JAMES II. BUTLER, M. D Resident Physician. 

Sister MARY ANN Sister Superior. 

CLINTON WAGNER, M. D Clinical Reporter. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 



J. J. RECKENBAUGH, DANIEL L. FLEMING, 

SAMUEL BECK, FRANK GALE, 

D. SCOTT BOYLE, HENRY M. JONES, 

K. S. CROPPER, ALEXIS L. MIDDLETON, 

HENRY C. EDELEN, B. M. PATTERSON. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



The fifty-third session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 15th 
of Octoher, 1860, and end on the first of March, 18G1. 

Since the last announcement, the Chair of Anatomy and 
Physiology has hecome vacant by the resignation of Prof. 
Roby_, who has withdrawn from the business of teaching in 
consequence of failing health. To fill the vacancy thus cre- 
ated, the Faculty have appointed Dr. William A. Hammond, 
of U. S. Army, who, they feel assured, will fully sustain the 
the previous reputation of the school. Dr. Hammond is well- 
known as a contributor to various medical journals, and has 
acquired a high position both in this country and in Europe 
by his anatomical and physiological investigations. 

In their Annual Circular, the Faculty desire to submit to 
"their professional brethren, and to the public generally, as 
they have done on former occasions, a brief exposition of 
their views, wishes and expectations, in the conduct of the 
Institution committed to their charge. 

Their design is to furnish such a course of instruction as 
they consider best adapted to be useful to those who are 
preparing to enter upon the duties of the Medical Profession. 
In order to accomplish this object, their lessons consist prin- 
cipally of a review of the elementary facts of the Science of 
Medicine, and of the obvious and admitted doctrines and 
precepts derived from those facts. They bestow no time or 
attention upon fanciful theories, speculations and conjectures, 
the opinionum commenta, which may be true or may be false. 
Such subjects are selected as are deemed of most importance 
from their practical utility, and the understanding of which 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

will best serve to enlighten the pupil in his future exertions 
to extend the bounds of his professional acquirements. The 
paramount effort through every part of the course, is to give 
that kind and that measure of knowledge, and that training 
and discipline of mind, which will best qualify the young 
physician to commence with safety the treatment of diseases, 
and will also best prepare him to derive from his own obser- 
vation and experience the clinical skill and sagacity which 
in their highest degree can never be learned from teachers. 
The important truth is recognized and ever kept in view, 
that the most valuable portion of all preliminary education 
is that which prepares tlie pupil to become his own instructor. 

In addition to their course of lectures, and as subsidiary to 
that course, the Faculty are in tlie habit of holding during 
the session weekly examinations in their respective depart- 
ments^ which the students are advised, though not required, 
to attend. The utility of these examinations is abundantly 
manifest. They serve as a thorough and exact review of the 
subjects which have been recently discussed. They afford 
opportunities for rectifying any errors or misapprehensions 
which may have occurred to the pupil while listening, or 
while neglecting to listen, to the lecture. And they also 
stimulate the student to increased attention and exertion. 
The facts and doctrines of the lectures become more interest- 
ing to him when he knows that his acquaintance with them 
will speedily be subjected to a public test. A spirit of emu- 
lation is thus diffused through the class, and all are more or 
less benefited who are capable of deriving pleasure from the 
manifestation of knowledge,, or of feeling shame from the 
exposure of ignorance. 

The lessons given in the several departments are aided by 
ample means for illustrations. Those consist of a collection 
of Anatomical, Surgical, Pathological and Obstetrical draw- 
ings, casts, models, and preparations, with a cabinet of 
Specimens of the Materia Medica, and a complete Chemical 
Apparatus. 

For the purpose of Clinical instruction, the School enjoys 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

the inestimable advantage of possessing a capacious hospital 
of its own. The Baltimore Infirmary, in the immediate 
vicinity of the College, has been greatly enlarged by the 
present Faculty, and is under their sole charge and control. 
Tliis institution contains a hundred and fifty beds, and re- 
ceives into its wards every variety of acute and chronic dis- 
eases, thus furnishing an abundant and never-failing sup- 
ply of cases for clinical study. During the sessions daily 
instruction is given at the bed-sides by the Professors of Sur- 
gery and of the Principles and Practice of Medicine ; and this 
system of teaching is continued tlirough the remainder of the 
year by other members of the Faculty, for the benefit of all 
matriculates of the School w^ho choose to attend. Of the 
utility and indeed indispensable necessity of clinical training 
as a part of medical education, the Faculty are thoroughly 
aware. They furnish it without charge ; they advise and 
exhort their pupils to frequent the wards, and observe for 
themselves the character and treatment of diseases ; and they 
admit to examination no candidate for graduation unless he 
produce evidence of his attendance at the hospital. 

The facilities afforded by the School for the study of Prac- 
tical Anatomy are all that the most diligent and zealous 
student can desire. Anatomical subjects are supplied in 
abundance, and at moderate expense. The rooms are open 
from the beginning of October; and, as they are lighted with 
gas, dissection can be pursued in the evening as well as 
during the day. 

The instruction given in the lectures and examinations, and 
in the wards of the hospital, constitute an important part, 
but yet only a part^ of medical education. Much in addition 
must be done for the student by liis private preceptor, and 
much must be done by himself. He must read diligently, 
and witli judicious selection of books; and he must learn to 
reflect and meditate on what he reads, and hears, and sees. 
He must learn to assist himself, or he can never be effectually 
assisted by others. Mental power and culture cannot be im- 
parted by pouring knowledge into vacant and inactive minds. 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The mind that cannot or will not think, can never be im- 
proved by beinf^ made the passive recipient of the thoughts 
of others. The results of medical education depend not 
barely upon the quantity and quality of the instruction given, 
and the ability of the instructors who give it, but also, and 
in a much larger measure, upon the character of the pupils — 
what they are by nature, and what they have been made by 
the training, good or evil, to which they were subjected be- 
fore they entered the halls of a Medical School. Of those 
who resort to Medical Schools some are qualified by natural 
abilities and by preliminary education to be far more easily, 
more rapidly, and more highly improved than others. But 
there are fewer none who may not, by diligent and perse, 
vering stud}^, and by exerting to the utmost such talents as 
they possess, obtain a degree of intelligence and knowledge 
which will give them the right to expect success in life, by 
giving them the power to be useful to the community. 
Where failure in the quest of medical knowledge is signal 
and entire, it may be ascribed in almost all cases rather to 
the fault or misfortune of the pupil than to the neglect or 
incapacity of his teachers. 

Diligence and industry on the part of pupils cannot be 
enforced by medical teachers. The age and position of 
Students of Medicine prohibit the employment of compulsory 
means. The Medical Faculty of the University of Maryland 
endeavor to exert over the young gentlemen entrusted to 
their care a friendly and salutary influence, not only in re- 
lation to their professional studies, but also as respects their 
moral character. They require regular attendance, atten- 
tion, and decorum in tlie lecture rooms ; they ascertain by 
frequent examinations the industry and proficiency of each 
member of the class ; and they announce in their statutes that 
after the final examination of each candidate for graduation, 
the result of his case is determined by reference to his moral 
as well as his intellectual qualifications, — by regard to what 
he is, as well as to what he knows. 

The Faculty endeavor to be mindful on all occasions of 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. » 

their obligations to the Medical Profession, to their pupils, 
and to the community. They seek to promote the best inter- 
ests of the Profession, and to maintain its ancient respect- 
ability and dignity, by exerting their utmost ability to im- 
prove the intellect and elevate the sentiments of the young 
cadets who are entering its ranks. And they desire to render 
good sei'vice to the commonweal, by doing their part in so 
educating the rising generation of physicians as will qualify 
them to ])errorm usefully, benevolently, and honorably, the 
duties of their vocation. 

In relation to themselves, the Faculty may be allowed to 
refer to the diligence and industry which they have exerted 
in the pursuit of their business as teachers of medicine — 
humble merits which will be acknowledged and attested by 
all who have been their pupils. They propose to continue 
their efforts with unabated energy ; and there is nothing that 
gives them more encouragement in their labors than to ob- 
serve the well-earned success and reputation of a large pro- 
portion of the large number of physicians who have been 
educated under their care. To them and to all the Alumni 
of the School, they pledge themselves to use all proper means 
for advancing the reputation and extending the usefulness of 
their Alma Mater. 

By order of the Faculty, 

G. W. MiLTENBERGER, Dean. 
Baltimore, March 15, 1860. 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

TREATED IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 

From February 1st, 1859, to February 1st, 1860. 



DISEASES 



Abortion 

Angina Diffusa 

Aplionia 

Apoplexy 

Briglit's Disease 

Bronchitis 

Chorea 

Cirrhosis of Liver 

Cohca rictonum 

Delirium Tremens 

Dementia 

Diabetes MelHtus 

Diarrhoea 

Diuresis 

Dropsy — 

Anasarca 

Ascites 

Duodenitis, chronic 

Dysentery 

Dyspepsia 

Emphysema of Lungs 

Enteritis, acute 

" chronic 

Epilepsy 

Fever — 

Intermittent 

Remittent, 

Typhoid 

Yellow 

Gastritis, Chronic 

Heart, functional disease of. 

" hypertrophy of 

" valvular disease of... 

Hemicrania 

Hepatitis 

Hydro-pncumo-thorax 





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1 










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i 1 




1 


5 
3 




6 








3 


1 


1 


1 


1 




8 










8 




4 

2 


1 


1 


9 






1 


3 


1 


2 










3 


2 


1 




1 


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5 










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18 






2 




1 






1 




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3 






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4 


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1 
1 





1 

2 
1 

5 
5 

12 
2 
2 
5 

13 
4 
1 

13 
1 

2 
6 
2 
5 
22 
2 
5 
6 
1 

43 
7 

20 
2 
7 
3 
1 

11 
1 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 



11 



DISEASES 





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Hysteria 

Metritis 

Neural gia 

Parturition 

Pa raly sis, Facial 

" Hemiplegia , 

" Paraplegia 

Peritonitis 

Phthisis 

Pleuritis , 

Pleur o-Pncumonia 

Pneumonia 

Prolapsus Uteri 

Renal Cysts, with Dysentery 

Kheumatism, acute 

" chronic 

Rubeola 

Sciatica 

Scorbutus 

Softening of Brain 

Spermatorrhoea 

Struma 

Tonsillitis 

Tetanus, chronic 



1 
10 

28 4 



226 80 24 50 24 404 



8 
2 
9 
1 
1 
1 

12 
2 

53 
7 
4 

13 
2 
1 

21 

17 
9 
2 
5 
2 
6 
2 

5 
2 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

TREATED IN THE SURGICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 

From February 1st, 1859, to February 1st, 1860. 



DISE AS ES . 





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Abscess 

Amaurosis 

Aneurism 

Anthrax 

Arthritis 

Arthrocace 

Burns 

Calculus, Renal 

" Vesical 

Caries of Ribs 

" " Tarsal bones 

« " Vertebrae 

Cataract 

Conjunctivitis, acute 

'' chronic 

Contusions 

C ophosis 

Cystitis 

Eczema 

Entropion 

Epulis 

Erysipelas 

Fistula in ano 

'• lachrymalis 

" urinal 

" recto- vesico-vaginal 

" vesico-vaginal 

Foreign body in bronchus. 

" " in cesophagus 

Fracture of Clavicle 

" of Cranium 

" of Femur, (simple) 

" of Femur, (compound and comminuted) 

" ofFibula 

" of Humerus 

" of Metatarsal bones.. 



4 


2 
3 


1 


1 


4 


2 










2 










1 


1 








1 


1 




2 




3 


1 




1 






3 




1 


2 


2 


1 








2 










6 


4 








35 


2 
2 








6 


8 








2 










1 










1 










6 










10 










1 












] 


1 


1 






] 








1 


1 


1 




1 


1 










1 










1 






2 




4 








2 


1 










2 










1 










1 











11 

8 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
6 
3 
2 
10 
37 
2 
9 
2 
1 
1 
6 
10 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
6 
1 
2 
1 
1 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 



13 



DISEASES . 



^ 



<x> o 



of Patella 

" of Radius 

" of Radius et ulr.a, (comp. and com.), 

" of Radius et ulna, (compound) 

of Ribs 

" of 'J'ibia, 

" of Tibia et Fibula, (simple) 

" of Tibia et Fibula, (comp. and com.) 
of Ulna 

" of Vertebrae 

Gonorrhoea , 

Hemorrhoids 

Hernia, inguinal 

Hj^drocele 

Hyd rosarcocele , 

Iriti s, acute 

'•' syphilitic , 

Leucorrhoea 

Lichen 

Luxation of Humerus 

Necrosis 

Onychia Maligna 

Ophthalmia, gonorrhceal 

" strumous, 

Orchitis 

Oza^na 

Paronychia 

Pernio 

Periostitis 

Polypus nasi 

" uteri 

Procidentia Iridis 

Psoriasis 

Scirrhus 

Staphyloma 

Stricture of urethra 

Sycosis 

Syphilis 

Synovitis 

Tinea Capitis 

Trichiasis 

Tumors 

Ulcers 

Wounds, gun-shot 

" incised 

" lacerated 



1 








1 


2 


1 






1 




1 

1 


2 






1 




2 

1 


2 








1 


3 


2 








2 


4 


1 






2 




3 


1 






2 




1 

2 


32 


4 






1 


37 


4 










4 


5 






1 


1 


7 


4 


1 








5 


2 










2 


2 










2 


6 




1 




1 


8 


3 










3 


1 










1 


1 








1 


2 


8 


2 








10 


3 


2 








3 
2 


1 








2 


3 


5 










5 


2 










2 


3 








1 


4 


3 








4 


7 


3 








2 


5 


1 










1 


1 


1 








1 
1 


1 










1 


6 


5 




_■ 


1 


16 


1 










1 


1 


2 








3 


1 










1 


90 


14 


6 




4 


114 


6 


2 






2 
1 


10 
1 


1 










1 


8 










8 


25 


5 


3 


1 


6 


40 


2 






2 




4 


2 










2 


1 










1 


843 


64 


15 


20 


40 


482 



14 SURGICAL OPERATIONS, &C. 

Total number of cases treated during the year 88G 

Number discharged 752 

died 70 

" remaining G4 



The following Surgical operations were performed from February Isi, 
1859, to February 1st, 1860. 

Amputation of arm 2 

of hand 1 

" of fingers 3 

" of femur 2 

" of toes 1 

Autoplastic operation 1 

Cataract 3 

Entropion 2 

Extirpation of Mamma3 3 

of Tumors 8 

Tonsils 1 

Fistula in ano, operation for 10 

" lachrymalis, operation for 2 

" vesico-vaginal, operation for 2 

Hernia, inguinal, operation for 1 

Hydrocele, operation for 10 

Lithotomy, operation for 2 

Lithotripsy , 4 

Necrosis ... 4 

Paracentesis abdominis ,. 3 

Kemoval of Polypus nasi 1 

" " uteri 1 

Keduction of dislocated humerus 1 

Staphyloma, operation for 1 



Session 1859-60. 



Adams, Samuel 
Adkisson, W. H. H. 
Baxley, Claude 
Bear, Alexander 
Beatty, I. E. 
Beck, Samuel 
Beckenbaugh, J. J. 
Benson, C. W. 
Biscoe, Enoch G. 
Boteler, H. E. 
Blackiston, W. H. 
Boyle, D. Scott 
Boyle, Samuel 
Bledsoe, Powhattan 

Breathed, James 

Brodwater, J. E. 
Brooks, II. A. 

Brown, John T. 

Bryan, N. B. 
Bushey, F. A. 
Caffry, John T. 
Canter, Gustavus 

Carlin, James 

Carter, C. Shirley 
Chatard, F. E. Jr. 
Clark, J. M., M. D. 



PHEOEPTORS. 

Dr. F. Donaldson, 
Dr. Baxley, 
Dr. Baxley, 
Dr. A. B. Arnold, 
Prof. Chew, 
Balto. Infirmary, 
Balto. Infirmary, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Prof. Chew, 
Balto. Infirmary, 

University of Virginia, 
JProf. N. K. Smith and Dr. 
JC. xMcGill, 

University of Virginia, 

Dr. B. H. D. Bull, 
( Profs. Miltenberger and 
JFrick, 

Dr. E. O. Cox, 

Dr. H. H. Bushey, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Prof. Chew, 
f Profs. Miltenberger and 
JFrick, 

Dr. Donaldson, 

Dr. Donaldson, 



ECSIDENCK. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Bermuda. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 
3Iaryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'nia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Mar3'land. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



16 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



Combs, Charles 

Cochran, John H. 

Coonan, John N. 

Cropper, K. S. 

Cross, E. B. 

Currej, Charles R. 

Daniel, J. S. 

Dare, George H., M. D. 

DeshoDs, I. H. 

Dealing, Isaiah 
Diggs, Charles H. 
Donsife, Henry L. 
Eareckson, Edwin 
Edelen, H. C. 
Edwards, A. G. 
Emory, Q. 
Erich, Augustus F. 

Everett, W. B. 

Fay, George "W. 

Field, J. W. 

Fleming, Daniel L. 

Ford, A. J. 

Fulton, Robert 

Franklin, James A. 

Friedenwald, Aaron 
Gale, Frank 
Garnet, Harrison R. 
Gill, William F. 

Glocker, T. W. 

Golden, J. Milton 
Gwyn, Charles C. 
Hamlin, W. S. 
Harding, Hiram W. 
Harris, David 



Prof. Smith and Dr. E. S. 
Tread we 11, 
Prof. Smith, 
Balto. Infirmary, 

Prof. Chew, 

University of Virginia, 

University of Md., 1858, 

Profs. Miltenberger and 

Frick, 

Dr. E. G. Cox, 

Dr. W. S. Thurston, 

Dr. W. H. Wagner, 

Prof. Chew, 

Balto. Infirmary, 

Dr. T. E. Hardy, 

Dr. W. C. Van Bibber, 

Dr. Monkur, 

Profs. Miltenberger and 

Frick, 

Dr. J. R. Muller, 

Profs. Miltenberger and 

Frick, 

Balto. Infirmary, 
J Prof. Smith and Dr. R. 
( E. Bromwell, 

f Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Frick, 

Prof. Smith, 

Balto. Infirmary, 

Dr. Richard Mackall, 

Dr. J. C. Orrick, 

{Profs. Miltenberger and 
Frick, 

Drs. Madison and Noell, 
Drs. Dunbar and Williams, 

Prof. Smith, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Louisiana. 

Australia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Pennsylv'nia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



]7 



Ilatton, II . Hannibal S. 

Heath, Horace M. 
Hebb, J. Wise 
Hensliaw, J. J. 
Hilleary, W. M. 
Hodges, William R. 
Holland, John T. 
Hoffman, Lawrence B. 
Holden, Randall 
Holton, T. S. 

Howard, E. Lloyd 

Hughes, J. Fife 
Jeffery, W. Y. 

Jessel, Adolph 

Jones, J. P., M. D. 
Jones, Henry M. 
Johnston, Ovid M. 
Kellam, Edward E. 
Lankiord, A. J. H. 

Latimer, Thomas S. 

Le Cato, Edwin W. 

Le Compte, Gr. Byron 
Lee, Daniel E. 
Lewis, J. E. H. 
Mackenzie, George B. 
Mackenzie, T. G. 
Magruder, J. W. 
Manifold, W. H. 

Mathews, J. E. 

McManus, F. A. 
Middleton, A. L. 

McCullough, J. Haines 

Miles, B. B. 
Monmonier, Lewis 
2 



J- Prof. Chew and Dr. 

[Cox, 
University of Virginia, 
Drs. Baxley and Abell, 
Dr. E. G. Ccx, 
Prof. Chew, 
Dr. H. P. C. Willson, 
Dr. C. M. Newman, 
Dr. J. C. S. Monkur, 

Dr. Holton, 
C Profs. Miltenberger and 
JFrick, 

University of Virginia, 

Dr. R. D. Lee, 
f Profs. Miltenberger and 
JFrick, 

University of Nashville, 

Balto. Infirmary, 

Dr. W. Johnston, 

Dr. S. B. Dowing, 

Prof. Smith, 

f Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Frick, 

f Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Frick, 

Dr. W. B. Le Compte, 

University of Maryland, 

Drs. Cox and Denny, 

Dr. J. P. Mackenzie, 

Dr. Baxley, 

Dr. W. B. Magruder, 

Dr. J. Gerry, 
r Prof. Smith and Dr. 
I Quigley, 

Dr. F. R. McManus, 

Balto. Infirmary, 
f Prof. Smith and Dr. 
I Rowland, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. J. F. Monmonier, 



Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 
I^Iaryland. 

Maryland. 

Tennessee. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'nia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'nia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'nia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland . 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 



18 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



Morfit, Charles McL. 

Muse, J. x\lexander B. 

Naylor, H. L. P. 
Neilson, Charles 31. 
Nelson, H. C. 
Nichols, Jeremiah 
Noel, H. K.,M. D. 
Oliver, J. L., M. D. 
Owens, Thomas, M. D. 
Owings, John H. Jr. 
wings, Harry W. 
Patterson, B. M. 
Penington, W. C. 

Perrie, George V. 

Pick, Theodore 
Price, Abram H. 
Powell, Samuel F. 
Pue, William H. 
Kaborg, Samuel A. 

Piichardson, J. S. 

Ridgeljs Nicholas T. 

Riley, David 
Robins, William H. 
Sahrland, Otho 

Saunders, W.N. 

Sedwick, William A. 

Shure, Charles A. 
Shipley, H. Clay 
Siemens, F. Marion 
Spath. Charles 
Spicer, H. Lewis 
Smith, Allen P. 
Smith, J. Edward 
Stenson, J. F. 
Stevenson, J. M. 



Prof. Smith, 

f Profs. Miltenberger and 

I Frick, 
Prof. Smith, 
Prof. "Smith, 
Dr. S. T. Knight, 
Dr. W. H. Hardy, 
University of Virginia, 
University of Md., 1859, 
University of Md., 1859, 
Dr. Thos. Owings, 
Dr. Thos. Owings, 
Balto. Infirmary, 
Drs. Dunbar and Cox, 

{Profs. Miltenberger and 
Frick, 

Dr. H. Pick, 

Dr. W. B. Price, 

Dr. J. F. Powell, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. C. H. Baborg, 
j Prof. Chew and Dr. 
\ Chesley, 

f Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Frick, 

Dr. E a. Cox, 

University of Maryland, 

Dr. B. Soli, 
J Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Frick, 

( Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Frick, 

Prof. Smith, 

Prof. Smith, 

Prof. Smith, 

Dr. Dunbar, 
Prof. Smith, 
Dr. W. P. Johnston, 
Prof. Chew, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'nia 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Dis. Columb. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



19 



Stokes, William B. 

Sullivan, J. M. 

Thistle, T. L. 

Thomson, J. Davis 
Trautraan, C. Theodore 
Travers, Frank K. 
Trippe, Edward K. 
Tucker, John T. 
Uhler, John E. 
Walker, Henry H. 
Watkins, T. G. 
Warfield, J. Dorsey 
Weisel, Daniel 
Wheedon, Thos. J., M. D. 
AVhitridge, William 
Wolfe, J. H. Riggs 
Woodward, William 
Worcester, Samuel II. 

Wootton, E. 



Profs. jViiltenberger and 

Frick, 

Dr. F. Douglass, 

Profs. Miltenberger and 

Frick, 

Dr. E. R. Tidings, 

Dr. W. A. Smith, 

Dr. J. E. 31. Chamberlan, 

Dr. C. C. Harper, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. S. R. Jackson, 

Prof. Chew, 

Dr. Jas. S. Martin, 

Dr. S. Weisel, 

University of Md., 1859, 

Dr. John Whitridge, 

Prof. Smith, 

Balto. Med. Institute, 

Prof. Smith and Dr. 
Wootton, 



Maryland . 

Maryland. 

Louisiana. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held Marcli, 1859, the following Candi- 
dates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



NAMES. 

William S. Adams/ 
Lewis Adler, V . 
Arthur Brogden,* . 
Rufns S. BrotlierSji 
Charles C. Byrne, i . 
Charles Clark, t 
Alexander Clendinnen/ 
Theodore Cooke, » 
John L. Crause,\ 
James H. Currey,i . 
Robert A. Dodson,y . 
Frederick C Doyle^^ 
William H. Dulaneyy 
Philip B. Duvall,r . 
Lewis M. Eastman,v 
John T. Eversfield,v 
Michael Glacken, ^ . 
Richard H. Green, v . 
Thomas H. Helsby,\ 
Alexander B. Hodgkin; 
Ephraim Hopkins, Jr. 3, 
Richard C. Lee, . i 
James G. Linthicum, ■ 
William J. Lodge, . \ 
Armistead G. Matlack.i 
Abel F. Mechem^ . : 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Florida. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 



21 



NAMES. 

Dickey Moore, ^ 
James M. Morrison^ 
Barrack Offutt, r' 
Josepli L. Oliver,/ 
William H. Osborn 
Thomas Owens,/ 
Joseph B. 0\vens_,' 
Thomas L. Patrick 
Samuel S. Quinn, * 
David F. Kicketts, » 
Robert K. Robinson, ^- 
Thomas P. Robosson/ 
Benj. Le Compte Smith,f, 
Robert H. Stirling/ 
George B. Sullivan, v 
Clinton Wagner, '". 
James K. Waters, '. 
William W. Wellin 
Benjamin F. Wells,. 
George Wentz, - . 
Thomas J. Wheeden 
Charles J. Wilson, . 






. RESIDENCE. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland.' 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

D. Columbia. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 15th of Octo- 
ber, 1860, and close on the 1st of March, 1861. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine^ Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each ; Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Infirmary as clinical assistants. The fee is one hundred 
dollars per year, payable in advance. 

statute; s. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3 Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this ajter one ia 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Fa- 
culty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of his 
own composition oa some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote| 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine tauo^ht in thii 



23 

school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if lie desires it; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session_, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the re- 
sult of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz: matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, tlie^ reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. ^ 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged abse^nce from Lectures, will always be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 

P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 

Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 

special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 

Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltenberger, Dean. 

)|^^ Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, who may he found at his house on the Uni- 
versity grouncU, icill conduct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient hoarding 
houses. The expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the 
country — good hoard heing obtained at from $3 to $4 per iceek. 



SUMMER COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



IN THE 



BALTIMORE II^FIRM^RY. 



This Course will commence on Monday, April 2d, 1860, and continue till June 
30th, to be resumed on September 1st, and continued till October 1st. 
It will be conducted bj the following Association : 

jN. E. SMITH, M. D.— Surgery. 
SAMUEL CHEW, M. D.— Practice of Medicine. 
G. W. MILTEJ^BERGER, M. D.— Midwifery and Diseases of 

Women and Children. 
CHARLES FRICK, M. D.— Materia Medica and Therepeutics. 

The Course will consist of Clinical Lectures and Examinations. The Lectures will 
be explanatory of the various Medical and Surgical cases under treatment in the 
Infirmary. The Examinations will be on the subjects of Surgery, the Practice of 
Medicine, Midwifery, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, and will be connected, as 
closely as may be practicable, with the most interesting and important of the 
Cases which shall successively enter the house. 

The principle ofeject of the Course is to render the abundant means afiforded by 
the Infirmary for the illustration of Practical Surgery and Medicine, of the utmost 
possible avail to the student. The class will have free access to the Hospital, will 
be present at all the Surgical Operations that occur, and will witness the character 
and treatment, the progress and result, of all the Cases that are received into the 
wards. They will hear the peculiarities of each of those cases explained at the bed- 
side ; and they will be expected to prepare themselves, by careful study of such 
books as shall from time to time be indicated to them, for regular examinations on 
the Natural History and Therapeutic Management of each of the diseases which 
they have been observing, and on the character and uses of the various remedial 
means which they have seen employed. 

Only two lessons — the one a Clinical Lecture, the other an Examination, — will be 
given daily. The student will consequently be allowed more ample time for read- 
ing, inquiry and reflection, than can be spared for such purposes during the winter 
session, when the lectures are necessarily numerous and given in rapid succes- 
sion. 

Fee for the entire Course $20. 



THE 



BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 




is constantly open iur tlie reception and caie of the sick. The 
patients aie attended by tlie Faculty of the Universitv, and 
nursed by the Sisters oi' Charity. An addition has lecentlv 
been erected, containincr commodious private apartments sepa- 
rate from tlie moi-e public portion of the house. Persons irom 
a distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find 
the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the 
accommodations required. 



Applications for admission may be made to Dr. James H. 
Butler, Resident Physician. 



tuMn^i^ioir^ ©f ms>ii^ik/Am® 



FIFTY- FOURTH 



jlnntjj^-l circular 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 




SESSIOISr 1861 — '6S 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO. 

MDCCCLXI. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIFTY-FOURTH 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



School of Medicine, 



SESSION 1861-6^, 



AND 



©^ir^t@©ii ®P Ei(l^?K8©(y[L^? 



SESSIOUNT 1860-S1- 



BALTIMORE: 

PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO. 



MDCCCLXI. 



TEXT BOOKS 



Anatomy and Physiology. — Leidy's Anatomy, Gray's 
Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, Draper's 
Physiology, Carpenter's Human Physiology, Kirke's Phys- 
iology. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children. — Caz- 
eaux's, Churchill's, Righy's Midwifery; West's, Evanson's, 
Condie's Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lectures, 
Williams on Diseases of the Chest, Latham on the Heart, 
Barlow's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medic a and Therapeutics. — Wood and Bache's 
Dispensatory, Wood's Therapeutics, Stille's Therapeutics. 



UNIVERSITY or MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



FACULTY OF PI^YSIC 



NATHAN K. SMITH, M. D, 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 



WM. E. A. AIKIN, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 



SAMUEL CHEW, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OP MEDICINE, AND OP 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. 



G. W. MILTENBERGEK, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN, 



WM. A. HAMMOND, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 



EDWARD WARREN, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 



JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D., 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

DEAN. 



OFFICERS OF INFIRMARY. 

EDWARD F. MILHOLLAND, M. D Resident Physician. 

Sister MARY ANN Sister Superior. 

H. L. SPICER, Jr Clinical Cleric. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS, 



SAMUEL ADAMS, J. HAINES McCULLOUGH, 

F. E CHATARD, Jr., CHARLES SPATH, 

THEODORE GLOCKER, WM. B. STOKES, 

E. LLOYD HOWARD, J. DAVIS THOMSON, 

THOMAS S. LATIMER, EDWARD WOOTTON. 






ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 



The fifty-fourth session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 14th 
of October, 1861, and end on the 1st of March, 1862. 

In their Annual Circular, the Faculty desire to submit to 
their professional brethren, and to the public generally, as 
they have done on former occasions, a brief exposition of 
their views, wishes and expectations, in the conduct of the 
Institution committed to their charge. 

Their design is to furnish such a course of Instruction as 
they consider best adapted to be useful to those who are 
preparing to enter upon the duties of the Medical Profession, 
In order to accomplish this object, their lessons consist prin- 
cipally of a review of the elementary facts of the Science of 
Medicine, and of the obvious and admitted doctrines and 
precepts derived from those facts. They bestow no time or 
attention upon fanciful theories, speculations and conjectures, 
the opinionum commenta, which may be true or may be false. 
Such subjects are selected as are deemed of most importance 
from their practical utility, and the understanding of which 
will best serve to enlighten the pupil in his future exertions 
to extend the bounds of his professional acquirements. The 
paramount effort through every part of the course, is to give 
that kind and that measure of knowledge, and that training 
and discipline of mind, which will best qualify the young 
physician to commence with safety the treatment of diseases, 
and will also best prepare him to derive from his own obser- 
vation and experience the clinical skill and sagacity which 
in their highest degree can never be learned from teachers. 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The important truth is recognized and ever kept in view, 
that the most valuahle portion of all preliminary education 
is that which prepares the pupil to become his own instructor. 

In addition to their course of lectures, and as subsidiary to 
that course, the Faculty are in the habit of holding during 
the session weekly examinations in their respective depart- 
ments, which the students are advised, though not required, 
to attend. The utility of these examinations is abundantly 
manifest. They serve as a thorough and exact review of the 
subjects which have been recently discussed. They afford 
opportunities for rectifying any errors or misapprehensions 
which may have occurred to the pupil v\rhile listening, or 
while neglecting to listen, to the lecture. And they also 
stimulate the student to increased attention and exertion. 
The facts and doctrines of the lectures become more interest- 
ing to him when he knows that his acquaintance with them 
will speedily be subjected to a public test. A spirit of emu- 
lation is thus diffused through the class, and all are more or 
less benefited who are capable of deriving pleasure from the 
manifestation of knowledge, or of feeling shame from the 
exposure of ignorance. 

Impressed w^ith the advantages to be derived from the use 
of models, paintings, preparations, and other means for illus- 
trating their oral instruction, the Faculty have imported 
from Paris a number of models of a size larger than life, 
showing the various parts of the human body in health and 
disease, and illustrating the courses on Surgery, Practice of 
Medicine, and Anatomy and Physiology. The advantages 
which these, in conjunction w4th a large number of paint- 
ings, diagrams, and wet and dry preparations, offer to the 
student, are inestimable ; and although they do not take the 
place of actual demonstrations from the dead and living sub- 
ject, they nevertheless are accessories, which tend greatly to 
elucidate and simplify the matters under discussion. In 
addition to the above, the cabinet of Materia Medica has 
recently been brought to a high degree of perfection, and 
the Chemical and Physical Apparatus, which has always 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

been ample, is constantly receiving such accessions as the 
state of the science may require. 

The Museum, ever an object of anxious care by the Faculty, 
has recently been augmented by the addition of a number of 
valuable skulls and other osteological specimens, from various 
animals, and still further accessions, both in specimens illus- 
trative of healthy and diseased conditions, will constantly be 
made — the Faculty being able, from the advantages at their 
command, to secure many valuable illustrations in Normal 
and Pathological Anatomy. 

For the purpose of Clinical instruction, the School enjoys 
the inestimable advantage of j)ossessing a capacious hospital 
of its own. The Baltimore Infirmary, in the immediate 
vicinity of the College, has been greatly enlarged by the 
present Faculty, and is under their sole charge and control. 
This institution contains a hundred and fifty beds, and 
receives into its wards every variety of acute and chronic 
diseases, thus furnishing an abundant and never-failing sup- 
ply of cases for Clinical study. During the sessions daily 
instruction is given at the bed-sides by the Professors of Sur- 
gery and of the Principles and Practice of Medicine ; and this 
system of teaching is continued through the remainder of the 
year by other members of the Faculty, for the benefit of all 
matriculates of the School who choose to attend. Of the 
utility and indeed indispensable necessity of Clinical training 
as a part of medical education, the Faculty are thoroughly 
aware. They furnish it without charge; they advise and 
exhort their pupils to frequent the wards, and observe for 
themselves the character and treatment of diseases ; and they 
admit to examination no candidate for graduation unless he 
produce evidence of his attendance at the hospital. 

The facilities afforded by the School for the study of Prac- 
tical Anatomy are all that the most diligent and zealous 
student can desire. Anatomical subjects are supplied in 
abundance, and at inoderate expense. The rooms are open 
from the beginning of October ; and, as they are lighted with 
gas, dissection can be pursued in the evening as well as 
during the day. 



8 ' ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The science of Physiology, a knowledge of which is so 
essential to the physician — Avho cannot intelligently treat 
derangements of the functional operations of the organs of 
the body till he is acquainted with the healthy actions of 
tliese organs — is taught not only orally, hut by means of 
actual experiments before the class. In this manner the 
various functions of the organism and the secretions and 
excretions of the body are prominently and effectively shown. 

The important science of Microscopical Anatomy is not 
neglected. The Faculty have placed in the Museum three 
excellent Microscopes, and have at their command one of the 
largest microscopical collections in the country, containing 
specimens of all the tissues and structures entering into the 
composition of the body. These are placed under the Micro- 
scopes, and changed as occasion requires. They are at all 
times open to the study of the students. The Faculty take 
pride in saying that they were the first to introduce into the 
country this method of studying Histology, a science which 
it is almost impossible to master, unless the opportunity is 
afforded of seeing for one's self. 

The instruction given in the lectures and examinations, and 
in the wards of the hospital, constitute an important part, 
but yet only a part, of medical education. Much in addition 
must be done for the student by his private preceptor, and 
much must be done by himself. He must read diligently, 
and with judicious selection of books ; and he must learn to 
reflect and meditate on what he reads, and hears, and sees. 
He must learn to assist himself, or he can never be effectually 
assisted by others. Mental power and culture cannot be 
imparted by pouring knowledge into vacant and inactive 
minds. The mind that cannot or will not think, can never 
be improved by being made the passive recipient of the 
thoughts of others. The results of medical education depend 
not barely upon the quantity and quality of the instruction 
given, and the ability of the instructors who give it, but also, 
and in a much larger measure, upon the character of the 
pupils — what they are by nature, and what they have been 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 9 

made by the training, good or evil, to whicli tliey were sub- 
jected before they ent(5red the halls of a Medical School. Of 
those who resort to Medical Schools, some are qualified by 
natural abilities and by preliminary education to be far more 
easily, more rapidly, and more highly improved than others. 
But there are few or none who may not, by diligent and per- 
severing study, and by exerting to the utmost such talents 
as they possess, obtain a degree of intelligence and knowledge 
which will give them the right to expect success in life, by 
giving them the power to be useful to the community. 
Where failure in the quest of medical knowledge is signal 
and entire, it may be ascribed in almost all cases rather to 
the fault or misfortune of the pupil than to the neglect or ' 
incapacity of his teachers. 

Diligence and industry on the part of pupils cannot be 
enforced by medical teachers. The age and position of 
Students of Medicine prohibit the employment of compulsory 
means. The Medical Faculty of the University of Maryland 
endeavor to exert over the young gentlemen entrusted to 
their care a friendly and salutary influence, not only in rela- 
tion to their professional studies, but also as respects their 
moral character. They require regular attendance, atten- 
tion, and decorum in the lecture rooms ; they ascertain by 
frequent examinations the industry and proficiency of each 
member of the class; and they announce in their statutes that 
after the final examination of each candidate for graduation, 
the result of his case is determined by reference to his moral 
as well as his intellectual qualifications, — by regard to what 
he is, as well as to what he knows. 

The Faculty endeavor to be mindful on all occasions of 
their obligations to the Medical Profession, to their pupils, 
and to the community. They seek to promote the best inter- 
ests of the Profession, and to maintain its ancient respecta- 
bility and dignity, by exerting their utmost ability to improve 
the intellect and elevate the sentiments of the young cadets 
who are entering its ranks. And they desire to render 
good service to the commonweal, by doing their part in so 



10 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

educating the rising generation of physicians as will qualify 
them to perform usefully, benevolently, and honorably, the 
duties of their vocation. 

In relation to themselves, the Faculty may be allowed to 
refer to the diligence and industry which they have exerted 
in the pursuit of their business as teachers of medicine — 
humble merits which will be acknowledged and attested by 
all who have been their pupils. They propose to continue 
their efforts with unabated energy ; and there is nothing that 
gives them more encouragement in their labors than to 
observe the well-earned success and reputation of a large 
proportion of the large number of physicians who have been 
educated under their care. To them and to all the Alumni 
of the School, they pledge themselves to use all proper means 
for advancing the reputation and extending the usefulness 
of their Alma Mater. 

By order of the Faculty, 

Gr. W. MiLTENBERGER, M. D., Dean, 

Baltimore, March 15, 1861. 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

TREATED IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 
From February 1st, 1860, to February 1st, 1861. 





o 


fd 


^ 


G 


W 


H 




p 


(t> 


W2 


S' 


5 


o 




o 


^-. 


fD C! 


o- 




DISEASES. 


: 




^ O 

CO p^ 
ert- 




5' 





L 



ungs, 



Abortion .. 
Abscess of 
Apoplexy . 

Bright's Disease , 

Chorea , 

Cirrhosis of Liver 

Delirium Tremens , 

Dilatation of Aorta 

Diphtheria , 

Demon tia , 

Diabetes Mellitus 

Diarrhoea , 

Diuresis 

Dropsy — 

Ascites 

Pvenal 

Dysentery 

** chronic 

Dyspepsia 

Emphysema of Lungs 

Enteritis 

Epilepsy 

Fever — 

Intermittent 

Puerperal 

Remittent 

Typhoid 

Typhus 

Gastritis, Chronic 

Hasmatemisis 

Heart, functional disease of. 

" hypertrophy of 

** valvular disease of. ... 



1 
1 
1 

1 

11 

1 



9 

4 

1 
2 

11 
3 

32 

1 
1 

29 

3 
19 
2 
4 
1 



1 
1 

2 
3 
1 
2 

12 
1 
2 
1 
1 

12 
5 

4 

2 
18 

3 
36 

2 

2 
1 

29 
1 
5 

26 
2 
5 
1 
3 
1 
1 



12 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 





o 


td 


W 


o 


t« 


H 






o 


W2 


CD 


o 


^ 




6 


CD 


O 5 


di 




p 


DISEASES. 


&- 


oved 
ques 


: 












■"■s" 


i 


cr5 





Hemicrania 

Hepatitis 

Herpes 

Hysteria 

Hemorrhage from bowels. 

Icterus 

Laryngitis 

Leucorrhoea 

Lumbago 

Menorrhagia 

Neuralgia 

Oxaluria 

Paralysis — 

Hemiplegia... 

Paraplegia.... 

Pericarditis 

Phthisis 

Pleuritis 

Pneumonia 

Poisoning 

Prolapsus Uteri 

Rheumatism, acute 

" chronic 

Rubeola 

Sciatica 

Scorbutus 

Splenic Enlargement 

Struma 

Tonsilitis 

Tetanus 

Urticaria 



4 

10 

2 

j 

i 35 

5 

1 

4 

15 

1 ' 
1 

4 i 

2 i 
1 ! 



1 

29 



2641 59 7 36 18 384 



1 

1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
4 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 

4 
1 
1 

46 
4 

15 
2 
1 

40 
6 
1 
4 

15 
2 
1 
6 
3 
1 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 



TREATED IN THE SURGICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 
From February 1st, 1860, to February 1st, 1861. 





O 


w 


w 




y 


w 


■^ 




c 


05 


^1 


a> 


a> 


D 








Zl. 


£5 


'±, 


DISEASES. 


p- 


o 


hQ o 






P 
5* 

a' 
era 








• 


^ 


: 


• 





Abscess 

Amaurosis 

Aneurism 

Arthrocace , 

Burn s 

Calculus, Renal 

Caries of Vertebrae 

Cataract 

Concussion of Brain 

Conjunctivitis, acute 

** chronic 

Contusion s 

Coxalgia 

Cystitis 

Eczema 

Epulis 

Epididymitis 

Erysipelas 

Fistula in ano 

* * lachrymalis 

* * laryngis 

** urinal 

** vesico-vaginal 

Fissura ani 

Fracture of Clavicle 

of Femur 

of Ilium 

of Fibula 

of Humerus 

of Metatarsal bones 

of Ext. Malleolus 

of Olecranon process of Ulna. 

of Tibia. 



2 
1 
1 

1 

2 
1 
4 
1 

2 

14 

6 
1 
1 

4 
3 
6 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 



3 
5 
1 

2 

2 

3 

1 

4 

1 

4 

6 

14 

2 

6 

1 

1 

4 

3 

6 

3 

1 

1 
o 

1 
1 

2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 



14 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 



DISEASES. 



o 


w 


pv 


O 


t^l 


-3 


p 


Q 


t— 1 O 




rt> :> 
















'-•• 


CD e: 


O- 


a 


M 


p^ 


< 

a> 


^ o 

CD O 
CO &- 

ct- 




2 

3* 





Fracture of Tibia and Fibula, (simple) 

" of " " (comp. &com.) 
" of Vertebrae 

Gonorrhoea 

Haemorrhoids 

Hernia 

Hare Lip 

Hydrocele 

Injury 

Iritis, acute 

*' syphilitic 

Lichen 

Lupus 

Luxation of Humerus 

Necrosis 

Opthalmia, gonorrhoeal 

* ' strumous 

Orchitis 

Osteo Sarcoma 

Otorrhoea 

Paronychia 

Pemphigus 

Pernio 

Periostitis 

Phlegmon 

Prurigo 

Pyaemia 

Psoriasis 

Ruptured perineum 

Scirrhus 

Staphyloma 

Scabies 

Stricture of urethra 

Syphilis 

Spinal Irritation 

Synovitis 

Tumors 

Talipes Yarus 



2 
3 

29 
4 

2 
1 
3 
9 
2 
2 
1 

1 
3 
1 

3 

5 

1 

5 
3 
3 

4 
1 

1 
1 



2 
1 
4 
4 

60 I 2 
1 i 1 
1 ! 
9 
2 



SURGICAL OPERATIONS, ETC. 



15 



DISEASES 



o 


td 


tc 


e 


i:^i 




c 


o 


W2 


o 


3 ^ 


o 


< 

fD 


(D B 


o- 


C- 


^ o 
















5' 








;• 






Ocj 





Ulcers 

Wounds, gunshot , 

" lacerated 

oflip.... 



17 


3 






1 


21 


3 










3 


1 


1 








2 


1 










1 


258 


37 


5 


12 


25 338 



The following Surgical operations were performed from February 1st, 
1860, to February \st, 1861. 

Amputation of arm , 2 

of hand 2 

" of fingers 2 

of thigh 5 

" of toes , 3 

of foot 2 

Cataract 4 

Extirpation of Mamui^ 3 

of Tumors 9 

of Eye.... 2 

Fistula in ano, operation for 7 

Fissura ani, " '* 1 

Fistula lachrymalis, operation for 3 

"■ yesico-vaginal, " " 3 

Hern ia 2 

Hydrocele, operation for 6 

Harelip, " " 1 

Lary ngotomy 1 

Lithotomy, " " 3 

Necrosis 3 

Paracentesis abdominis 1 

Reduction of dislocated femur 1 

" " " humerus 1 

Phymosis 3 

Ruptured perineum 1 

Staphyloma 2 

Strabismus 2 

Trephining 1 

Talipes varus 2 



Cataloone of JUatricnlntes- 

SESSION 1860-61. 



NAMES. 

Adams, James P. 
Adams, Samuel 
Adkisson, \Y. H. II. 
Anders, C. Harry 
Bartels, A. 
Beatty, George D. 
Beatty, J. Edward 
Benson, Philander V. 
Benson, W. H. 
Beltz, Theodore H. 
Bird, Benj. L. 
Blakistone, W. S. 
Boteler, R. H. E. 
Bowles, C. Richard 
Boyle, Samuel 
Brewer, John W. 
Broadbent, Wm. 
Brooks, Horace A. 
Bryan, N. B. 
Buhrman, Harvey 
Burch, J. C. 
Burgess, Lloyd D. 
Bushay, F. A. 
Caffry, John T. 
Carriere, C. Louis 
Carroll, C. A. 
Chatard, F. E. Jr. 
Clendinen, A. Jr., M. D, 



PRECEPTORS. 

Dr. James Dwindle, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof.;Smith and Dr. Baxley, 
Dr. L. Wachter, 

Dr. F. Donaldson, 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Dr. a. W. Benson, 
Drs. Mason and Moore, 
Dr. Henry E. Beltz, 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Dr. 0. Smith, 
University of Virginia, 

Prof. Smith and Dr. Claude, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. E. G. Cox, 
Dr. L. Wachter, 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Dr. Thomas Burgess, 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. C. Johnston, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
University of Maryland, 1859 



RESIDENCE. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland , 

Alabama. 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia, 

Bermuda. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsyl'nia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsyl'nia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



n 



Combs, Charles 
Conner, John A. 
Cooke, 0. A. 
Coonan, John N. 
Cooper, James Jr. 
Craig, James 
Cutlar, Roger 
Davis, Thomas S. 

Biggs, Charles H. 

Dorsey, Julius 0. 

Edwards, Alexander G. 

Emory, Richard 
Ensor, J. Fulton 
Erich, Augustus F. 

Everett, W. B. 

Ewing, Samuel T. 
Fairbank, Samuel 
Frush, Moreau F. 
Fisher, George M. 
Fleming, Daniel L. 
Foreman, E. K. 
Frank, S. L. 
Freeman, Lewis 
Freeny, G. W. 

Gaar, B. F. 

Gardner, Hugh W. 
Gibbons, E. P. 
Gillam, Francis 
Gill, Wm. F. 
Glocker, Theodore W. 

Gott, Lewis E. 

Gould in, J. Milton 
2 



Dr. E. J. Henkle, 

Dr. F. Cooke, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. W. Y. Wootton, 

Dr. G. G. Farnandis, 

Dr. F. J. Cutlar, 

Drs. G. R. & T. Sappington, 
(Profs. Miltenberger and 
( Hammond, 

Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar, 

{Profs. Miltenberger and 
Hammond, 

Dr. W. C. Van Bibber, 
Dr. George W. Fay, 

r Profs. Miltenberger and 
[Hammond, 

Dr. C. W. Newman, 

Dr. P. M. Womble, 

Dr. Monkur, 

Dr. Charles E. Tarr, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. J. M. Geyer, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. Sappington, 

Dr. C. Humphreys, 

{University of Virginia and 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
r University of Virginia and 
I Profs. Chew and Warren. 

Dr. D. McLaughlin, 
J University of Virginia and 
[ Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Dr. Orrick, 

{Baltimore Infirmary & Profs. 
Miltenberger and Hammond, 
(Dr. Hagner and 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
{Profs. Miltenberger and 
Hammond, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Florida. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Virginia. 

N. Carolina. 
Maryland. 
N. Carolina 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

D. C. 

Virginia. 



18 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



Greenley, William 
Harris, John C. 
Hoffman, Laurence B. 
Holden, Randall 
Hopkins, Arundel 

Howard, E. Lloyd 

Hurt, R. T., M. D. 

Jessel, Adolph. 

Johnson, Richard P., M. 
Johnston, Ovid M. 

Kellam, E. E. 

Latimer, Thomas S. 
Lecompte, G. Byron 
Lewis, Henry G. 
Lewis, James E. H. 
Mackenzie, George B. 

Mackenzie, Thomas G. 

Magruder, J. K. 
Manifold, Wm. H. 
Martin, John H. 
Maynadier, J. Y, 
McCuUough, J. Haines 
McKnew, W. R. 
McMeal, Daniel 
Miles, B. B. 
Monmonier, Louis 
Morfit. Charles M. 
Morgan, W. P. 
Morrison, Geo. W. 
Myers, E. W. 
Nichols, Jeremiah 
Nicolassen, George A. 
Neilson, Charles 
Nelson, H. C 



Dr. J. H. Holt, 
Dr. Wm. Maxwell, 
Dr. Monkur, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

{Baltimore Infirmary & Profs. 
Miltenberger and Hammond, 
Atlanta Medical College, 
f Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Hammond, 
D. University of Mary'nd, 1849, 
Dr. Wm. Johnston, 
f Dr. S B. Downing and Profs. 
\ Miltenberger and Hammond, 

{Baltimore Infirmary, & Profs. 
Miltenberger and Hammond, 
Dr. Wm B. Lecompte, 

{Dr. H. E. Lewis and 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 

Profs. Chew and Warren, 
f Profs. Miltenberger and 
( Hammond, 
C Prof. Smith and 
I Dr. Mackenzie, 

Dr. Wm. B. Magruder, 

Dr. James Gerry, 

Dr. T. M. Elliott, 

Dr. Wm. H. Zollickoffer, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Dr. Belt, 

Dr. McMeal, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. Monmonier, 

Profs. Smith and Hammond, 

Dr. J. L. Gibbons, 

Dr. McLaughlin, 

Dr. J. E. Healy, 

Dr. Wm. H. Hardey, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Profs. Smith and Hammond, 

Profs. Smith and Hammond, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Pennsyl'nia. 

Virginia. 

Pennsyl'nia. 
Maryland. 
N. Carolina. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsyl'nia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsyl'nia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

D. C. 

Maryland. 

Pennsyl'nia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OP MATRICULATES. 



19 



Noel, Agideous 
Ould, Elisha R. 
Owens, B. F. 
Owens, George E. R. 
Owings, John H. Jr. 
Payne, Josiah T. 
Penington, W. Cooper 
Pick, Theodore . 
Pierce, Harvey L. 

Powell, Sam'l Fletcher 

Price, Abran:i H. 
Price, Richard E. 

Redding, E. Q. 

Richardson, J. S. 

Ridgely, N. Q. 
Riley, David 
Rippard, William 
Roberts, William C. 
Robinson, John B. 
Rowe, W. 
Russell, C. F. 

Sanders, Wm. W. 

Scott, James H. 
Sharp, T. H.,M. D. 
Shure, C. A. 
Smith, Alan P. 
Smith, Francis J. 
Spath, Charles 
Stevenson, John M. 
Stenson, J. F. 

Stokes, William B. 
Sullivan, J. McKew 
Templeman, James A. 
Thomas, G. S. C, M. D. 



Dr. Pleiffer, 

Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Dr. Wm. J. Thompson, 
Drs. T. and H. W. Owings, 
Dr. R. G. Rankin, 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Dr. C. H. Pick, 
Dr. H. P. P. Yeates, 

{Profs. Miltenberger and 
Hammond, 
Dr. Wm. R. Price, 
Dr. Baxley, 
( Dr. J F. Long and 
I Profs. Chew and Warren, 

{Profs. Miltenberger and 
Hammond, 

Dr. J. P. Mackenzie, 

Profs. Chew and Warren, 

Dr. Stokes, 

Profs. Chew and Warren, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. H. D. Mitchell, 

Dr. J. D. Starry, 
f Profs. Miltenberger and 
I Hammond, 

Dr. Chandler, 

University of New York, 

Dr. Sappington, 

Prof. N. K Smith, 

Drs. O. J. and J. F. Smith, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

Dr. J. S. Stevenson, 

f Baltimore Infirmary & Profs. 
I Miltenberger and Hammond, 

{University of Virginia and ^. . . 
Profs. Chew and Warren, ° 

University of Maryland, 1849, Maryland. 



Pennsyl'nia. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
N. Carolina. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
N. Carolina. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Ireland. 



20 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



Thomas, Joseph Ford 
Thompson, John W. 

Thomson, I. Davis 

Trautman, C. Theodore 
Trippe, Edward R. 
Trumbo, George H. 
Tucker, John T. 
Uhler, John R. 
Vannort, E. A. 
Watkins, Thomas G. 
Wells, Charles A. 
Weisel, Daniel 
Wernwag, Righter L. 
Wheeler, Wm. B. 
White, Gideon 
Whitridge, William 

Wolfe, J. H. Riggs 

Woodward, Wm. 
Wootton, Edward 

Wyatt, Richard 0. 

Yingling, George S. 
Zeigler, Asa H. 



Drs.J.C.&G. S. C.Thomas 
Dr. J. P. Mackenzie, 

{Baltimore Infirmary & Profs. 
Miltenberger and Hammond, 

Dr. F. E. B. Hintze, 

Profs. Chew and Warren, 

Dr. J. W. Hering, 

Dr. C. C. Harper, 

Profs. Chew and Warren, 

Dr. M. Johns, 

Profs, Chew and Warren, 

Dr. A. S. Magruder, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Dr. H. E. Beltz, 

Dr. Monkur, 

Dr. Whitridge, 
("Prof. N. R. Smith and 
\ Drs. Hershey and Riggs, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 

{University of Virginia and 
Profs. Chew and Warren, 
Dr. Wm. A Mathias, 



Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland, 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Mar} land, 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 



GRADUATES. 



At the Annual Commencement held March, 1860, the following Can 
didates received the degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



XAMES. 

Baxley, Claude' 
Bear, Alexander',^ 
Beck, Samuel, >^ 
Beckenbaugli, J. J.K 
Benson, Charles,'^ 
Bledsoe, PowhatanK" 
Boyle, Daniel Scott^- 
Breatlied, James k 
Broadwater, Jos. E./ 
Canter, Gustavus ; 
Cocliran, John H.^ 
Cropper, Kendall S.^ 
Daniel, John S.; 
Dewling, Isaiah,/ 
Eareckson, Edwin/ 
Edelin, Henry C- 
Fay, George W.* 
Field, John W./ 
Franklin, James A.' 
Friedenwald, Aaron; 
Fulton, Kobert 
Gale, Frank, 
Gwynn, Charles L.^ 
Harding, Hiram W/ 
Hatton,' Richard H. S 
Heath, Horace M. 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland . 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 



22 



GRADUATES. 



NAMES. 

Hebb, John W.^ 
Hilleary, W. M.v 
Hodges, Wm. B.v 
Holton, Thomas S.\ 
Hughes, James F.^ 
Jones, Henry M.v 
Lankford, A. J. H.^^ 
Le Cato, Edwin W> 
Lee, Daniel E. \ 
Mathews, James E.r 
McManus, F. A. v 
Middleton, A. L.\ 
Muse, Josiah A. B.*' 
Naylor, Henry L. P. 
Owings, Harry W., 
Patterson, B. M. . 
Pue, William H.v 
Kaborg, Samuel A.« 
Kobins, William H.v 
Sedwick, William A.« 
Slemons, &. M. 
Spicer, Hiram L. 
Tr avers, Frank E.. 
Walker, Hiram H.:; 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland." 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 



Fiii, iira7iM?ii, 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 15th of Octo- 
ber, 1861, and close on the 1st of March, 1862. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Cheniistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each ; Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Infirmary as clinical assistants. The fee is one hundred 
dollars per year, payable in advance. 

S T .^ T XJ T E S - 

1 . Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of 
his own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 



24 FEES, STATUTES, ETC. 

school . He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer", before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

Y. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desires it ; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the result 
of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that, while any student w^ho has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will ahvays be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 

P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 

Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 

special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 

Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltenberger, Dean. 

g^^J/r. Petei^ Smith, ihe Janitor, who may he found at Ms house on the Uni- 
versity grounds, will conduct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses. The expenses of living are as loio in Baltimore as in any city in ihe 
country — good board being obtained at from $3 to $4 per week. 



THE 



BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 




is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently 
been erected, containing commodious private apartments sepa-j 
rate from the more public portion of the house. Persons fro 
a distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will fin 
the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the. 
accommodations required. 

Application for admission may be made to Dr. James H. 
Butler, Kesident Physician. 



z 



-'■-J^ 



(y[M8^7i(^iaTY ©IF Kiil*\lFi¥(L^M© 



FIFTY-FIFTH 



^NNXJ^^lI. CIRCIJLA.R 



OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 




SESSIOl^ 186S-eS. 



balti:moke: 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



MDCCCLXir. 



, 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 



F I F T Y - F I F T H 



AKNl[JAi CRCSiAR 



OF THE 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 



SESSION 186^-63; 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES, 



SESSIOIsT lsei-63 



B A L T I xM R E : 
PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



MDC C CLXII 



TEXT BOOKS. 



Anatomy and PiiYSiOLoaY. — Leidy's Anatomy, Gray's 
Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, Draper's 
Physiology, Carpenter's Human Physiology, Kirke's Phys- 
iology. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children. — Caz- 
I eaux's, Churchill's, Kigby's Midwifery ; West's, Evanson's, 

i Condie's Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lectures, 
Williams on Diseases of the Chest, Latham on the Heart, 
Barlow's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — Wood and Bache's 
Dispensatory, Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Medi- 
ca, Beck's Materia Medica. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN. R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 



WM. E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 



SAMUEL CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF TUE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, AND OP 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. 



G. W. MILTENBERGEE, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN 



NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

LECTURER ON ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 



RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D. 

LECTURER ON MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 



JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D 

DEAN. 



OFFICERS OF THE INFIRMARY. 



EDWARD F. MILHOLLAND, M. D Resident Physician. 

Sister MARY ANN" , Sister Superior. 

THEODORE W. GLOCKER, M. D Clinical Clerk. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 



JOHN A. CONNER, 
WM. B. EVERETT, 
EDWIN K. FOREMAN, 
OVID M. JOHNSTON, 
J. W. MAGRUDER, 



WILBUR P MORGAN, 
RICHARD E. PRICE, 
WILLIAM C. ROBERTS, 
EDWARD R. TRIPPE, 
GEORGE S. TINGLING. 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 



The fifty-fiftli session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 13th 
of October, 1862, and end on the 1st of March, 1863.. 

In their Annual Circular, the Faculty desire to submit to 
their professional brethren, and to the public generally, as 
they have done on former occasions, a brief exposition of 
their views, wishes and expectations, in the conduct of the 
Institution committed to their charge. 

Their design is to furnish such a course of Instruction as 
they consider best adapted to be useful to those who are 
preparing to enter upon the duties of the Medical Profession. 
In order to accomplish this object, their lessons consist prin- 
cipally of a review of the elementary facts of the Science of 
Medicine, and of the obvious and admitted doctrines and 
precepts derived from those facts. They bestow no time or 
attention upon fanciful theories, speculations and conjectures, 
the opinionum commenta, which may be true or may be false. 
Such subjects are selected as are deemed of most importance 
from their practical utility, and the understanding of which 
will best serve to enlighten the pupil in his future exertions 
to extend the bounds of his professional accjuirements. The 
paramount effort through every part of the course, is to give 
that kind and that measure of knowledge, and that training 
and discf[iline of mind, which will best qualify the young 
physician to commence with safety the treatment of diseases, 
and will also best prej)are him to derive from his own obser- 
vation and experience the clinical skill and sagacity wliich 
in their highest degree can never be learned from teachers. 



6 ANNUAL CmCULAR. 

The important truth is recognized and ever kept in view, 
that the most valuable portion of all preliminary education 
is that which prepares the pupil to become his own instructor. 

In addition to their course of lectures, and as subsidiary to 
that course, the Faculty are in the habit of holding during 
the session weekly examinations in their respective depart- 
ments, Avhich the students are advised, though not required, 
to attend. The utility of these examinations is abundantly 
manifest. They serve as a thorough and exact review of the 
subjects which have been recently discussed. They afford 
opportunities for rectifying any errors or misapprehensions 
which may have occurred to the pupil while listening, or 
while neglecting to listen, to the lecture. And they also 
stimulate the student to increased attention and exertion. 
The facts and doctrines of the lectures become more interest- 
ing to him when he knows that his acquaintance with them 
will speedily be subjected to a public test. A spirit of emu- 
lation is thus diffused through the class, and all are more or 
less benefited who are capable of deriving pleasure from the 
manifestation of knowledge, or of feeling shame from the 
exposure of ignorance. 

Impressed with the advantages to be derived from the use 
of models, paintings, preparations, and other means for illus- 
trating their oral instruction, the Faculty have imported 
from Paris a number of models of a size larger than life, 
showing the various parts of the human body in health and 
disease, and illustrating the courses on Surgery, Practice of 
Medicine, and Anatomy and Physiology. The advantages 
which these, in conjunction with a large number of paint- 
ings, diagrams, and wet and dry preparations, offer to the 
student, are inestimable ; and although they do not take the 
place of actual demonstrations from the dead and living sub- 
ject, they nevertheless are accessories, which tend greatly to 
elucidate and simplify the matters under discussion. In 
addition to the above, the cabinet of Materia Medica has 
recently been brought to a high degree of perfection, and 
the Chemical and Physical Apparatus, which has always 



ANNUAL CIRCULAU. 7 

been ample, is constantly receiving such accessions as the 
state of the science may require. 

The Mnsenm, ever an object of anxious care to the Faculty, 
has recently been augmented by the addition of a number of 
valuable skulls and other osteological sioecimens, from various 
animals, and still further accessions in specimens illustra- 
tive of both healthy and diseased conditions, will constantly 
be made — the Faculty being able, from the advantages at 
their command, to secure many valuable illustrations in 
Normal and Pathological Anatomy. 

For the purpose of Clinical instruction, the School enjoys 
the inestimable advantage of possessing a capacious hosjoital 
of its own. The Baltimore Infirmary, in the immediate 
vicinity of the College, has been greatly enlarged by the 
present Faculty, and is under their sole charge and control. 
This institution contains a hundred and fifty beds, and 
receives into its wards every variety of acute and chronic 
diseases, thus furnishing an abundant and never-failing sup. 
ply of cases for Clinical study. During the sessions daily 
instruction is given at the bed-sides by the Professors of Sur- 
gery and of the Principles and Practice of Medicine : and this 
system of teaching is continued through the remainder of the 
year by other members of the Faculty, for the benefit of all 
matriculates of the School who choose to attend. Of the 
utility and indeed indispensable necessity of Clinical training 
as a part of medical education, the Faculty are thoroughly 
aware. They furnish it without charge ; they advise and 
exhort their pupils to frequent the wards, and observe for 
themselves the character and treatment of diseases ; and they 
admit to examination no candidate for graduation unless he 
produce evidence of his attendance at the hospital. 

Particular attention will be given to the important subject 
of Military Surgery. 

The facilities afforded by the School for the study of Prac- 
tical Anatomy are all that the most diligent and zealous 
student can desire. Anatomical subjects are supplied in 
abundance, and at moderate expense. The rooms are open 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR, 

from the beginning of October ; and, as they are lighted with 
gas, dissection can be pursued in the evening as well as 
during the day. 

The science of Physiology, a knowledge of which is so 
essential to the physician — who cannot intelligently treat 
derangements of the functional operations of the organs of 
the body till he is acquainted with the healthy actions of 
these organs — is taught not only orally, but by means of 
actual experiments before the class. In this manner the 
various functions of the organism and the secretions and 
excretions of the body are prominently and effectively shoAvn. 
I The instruction given in the lectures and examinations, and 

I in the wards of the hospital, constitute an important part, 

but yet only a 'part, of medical education. Much in addition 
must be done for the student by his private preceptor, and 
much must be done by himself. He must read diligently, 
and with judicious selection of books ; and he must learn to 
reflect and meditate on what he reads, and hears, and sees. 
I He must learn to assist himself, or he can never be effectually 

I assisted by others. Mental power and culture cannot be 

imparted by pouring know^ledge into vacant and inactive 
minds. The mind that cannot or will not think, can never 
be improved by being made the passive recij^ient of the 
thoughts of others. The results of medical education depend 
not barely upon the quantity and quality of the instruction 
given, and the ability of the instructors who give it, but also, 
and in a much larger measure, upon the character of the 
pupils — what they are by nature, and what they have been 
made by the training, good or evil, to which they were sub- 
jected before they entered the halls of a Medical School. Of 
those who resort to Medical Schools, some are qualified by 
natural abilities and by preliminary education to be far more 
easily, more rapidly, and more highly improved than othej-s. 
But there are few or none who may not, by diligent and per- 
severing study, and by exerting to the utmost such talents 
as they possess, obtain a degree of intelligence and knowledge 
which will give them the right to expect success in life, by 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. y 

giving tliem the power to be useful to the community. 
Where failure in the quest of medical knowledge is signal 
and entire, it may he ascrihed in almost all cases rather to 
the fault or misfortune of the pupil than to the neglect or 
incapacity of his teachers. 

Diligence and industry on the part of pupils cannot he 
enforced hy medical teachers. The age and position of 
Students of Medicine prohibit the employment of compulsory 
means. The Medical Faculty of the University of Maryland 
endeavor to exert over the young gentlemen entrusted to 
their care a friendly and salutary influence, not only in rela- 
tion to their professional studies, but also as respects their 
moral character. Tliey require regular attendance, atten- 
tion, and decorum in the lecture rooms ; they ascertain by 
frequent examination the industry and proficiency of each 
member of the class ; and they announce in their statutes that 
after the final examination of each candidate for graduation, 
the result of his case is determined by reference to his moral 
as well as his intellectual qualifications, — by regard to what 
he is, as well as to what he knows. 

The Faculty endeavor to be mindful on all occasions of 
their obligations to the Medical Profession, to their pupils, 
and to the community. They seek to promote the best inter- 
ests of the Profession, and to maintain its ancient resj^ecta- 
bility and dignity, by exerting their utmost ability to improve 
the intellect and elevate the sentiments of the young cadets 
who are entering its ranks. And they desire to render 
good service to the commonweal, by doing their part in so 
educating the rising generation of physicians as will qualify 
them to perform usefully, benevolently, and honorably, the 
duties of their vocation. 

In relation to themselves, the Faculty may be allowed to 
refer to the diligence and industry which they have exerted 
in the pursuit of their business as teachers of medicine — 
humble merits which will be acknowledged and attested by 
all who have been their pupils. They propose to continue 
their efforts with unabated energy ; and there is nothing that 



10 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

gives them more encouragement in their labors than to 
observe the well-earned success and reputation of a large 
proportion of the large number of physicians who have been 
educated under their care. To them and to all the Alumni 
of the School, they pledge themselves to use all proper means 
for advancing the reputation and extending the usefulness 
of their Alma Mater. 

By order of the Faculty, 

G. W. MiLTENBERGER, M. D., Dean, 

Baltimore, July 1. 1862. 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

Treati'il in tl\e Medical Department of tSie Baltimore Infirmary, 

From F3b:iiary 1st, 1861, to February 1st, 1863. 



DISEASES, 



iibscess of Liver 

Angina Diffusa. 

Angina Pectoris 

Apoplexy 

Brights Disease 

Broncbitis 

Acute 

Capillary... 

Chronic 

Chlorosis 

Chorea 

Cirrhosis of Liver .... 

Coryza 

Delirium Tremens.. . 

Dementia 

Dropsy 

xVscites 

Renal 

Dysentery 

Acute 

Chronic 

Dysmenorrhaia 

Dyspepsia 

Emphysema of Lungs 

Epilepsy 

Epistaxis 

Fevers 

Intermittent .. 

Remittent 

Typhoid 

Typhus 



Q 

Ed 

a 
o 


Q 
> 

Pd 


ii 
if 


Q 

5 








1 


1 






1 


2 














2 


G 






1 


1 








1 


4 






2 








1 






1 


1 






« 


15 


1 


1 


1 


1 








11 






1 


o 

1 








10 


o 


1 






1 


1 




1 








22 








1 








57 




1 


13 

1 



1 
1 
1 

2 
4 

7 
1 
7 
2 
1 
1 
1 
17 
1 

1 
1 

12 
3 
1 

15 
1 
3 
1 

24 

1 
72 

1 



12 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 



DISEASES 



Gastritis 

Acute . 

Chronic 

Gout 

Heart, Valvular Disease of. 

Hemorrhage from Bowels.. 

Hepatitis 

Hysteria 

Laryngitis 

Acute ,- 

Chronic 

Leucorrhea 

Lumbago 

Neuralgia 

Otitis 

Paralysis 

Hemiplegia 

Paraplegia 

Parotitis 

Peritonitis 

Pharyngitis 

Phthisis , 

Pleuritis 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia — Pleuro 

Pneumonia — Typhoid 

Prolapsus Uteri 

Rheumatism 

Acute 

Chronic 

Rubeola 

Sciatica 

Scorbutus 

Small Pox 

Struma 

Tabes IMesenterica 

Tonsilitis 



o 


s 




Q 

5 


6 

< 


E- 








2 






2 


1 






2 




3 


1 










1 




4 




5 


1 


10 


1 










1 


1 










1 


3 


o 








5 


1 


1 








1 
1 


2 










2 


3 










3 


2 


2 








4 


2 










2 


2 


2 




1 


2 


7 




1 




1 




2 


1 






1 




1 
1 


1 










1 




15 


2 


7 


3 


27 


2 










2 


5 








1 


6 


1 


4 




2 




1 
2 
4 


18 
9 
2 


1 




1 


2 
5 


21 


15 


2 


4 
3 

1 


^ 


2 




1 


5 


3 


2 


1 


1 


2 










2 




205 


43 


8 


44 


24 


325 



A LIST OF THE CASES 

Treated in the Surgical Department of tlie Baltimore Infirmary, 

From February 1st, 1881, till February 1st' 1862. 



Abscess 

Amaurosis 

Anthrax 

Arthrocace 

Balanitis 

Burns 

Cataract 

Calculus 

Conj unctivitis 

Acute 

Chronic 

Contract'n of Cicatrix fr'm Burn 

Contusion 

Coxalgia 

Cystitis 

Dislocation of Knee Joint 

Dropsy of Bursa Patellae 

Eczema 

Entropion 

Erysipelas 

Erythema 

Fissura Ani 

Fistula in Ano 

" Lachrymalis 

" Nasi 

" in Perineo 

'* Urinary 

" Yesico Vaginal 

Fracture of Clavicle 

" of Ext. Malleolus.... 

" of Femur 

'* of Humerus 

" of Radius and Ulna 

(simple) 

" of Radius and Ulna 
(comp. and com.). 



6 

1 
1 

1 

5 
2 
2 

2 
1 

11 

2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 
2 
1 






7 
2 
1 
4 
1 
8 
2 
3 

2 

5 

1 

11 

2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 



14 



LIST OP CASES TREATED. 



CASES 



Fracture of Cranium 

of Tibia 

of Tibia and Fibula 
" of Vertebra 

Gonor rlia3a , 

Hernia 

Hydrocele 

Hy drosarcocele 

Hypopyon 

Injury 

Iritis, Sypbylitic 

Malformation of Fingers 

Medullary Sarcoma 

Mucus Condylomata 

Necrosis 

Opthalmia, Gonorrhosal 

Orchitis , 

Paronychia 

Pernio 

Phlegmon 

Psoriasis 

Pyaamia 

Rupia 

Scabies 

Scirrhus •. 

Spinal Irritation 

Staphyloma 

Strabismus 

Stricture of Urethra 

Synovitis 

Syphilis 

Talipes Varus 

Tumors 

Ulcers 

Varicose Veins 

Wounds 

Gunshot 

Incised , 

Lacerated , 

Punctured , 



27 
1 
9 

1 

8 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
10 
3 
4 

4 
1 

2 
1 
3 



1 

2 

4 
61 

3 

6 
16 

1 

7 
5 

1 
1 

258 



26 



IlEMOVED BY 
REQUEST. 


El! 
3 


6 
< 




2 


1 

1 




1 


1 
1 

1 




8 


1 


1 




1 


1. 




1 


1 


1 
1 


5 
2 


1 






• 


1 




5 


13 


17 



2 
4 

1 
1 

28 
4 

10 
1 
1 

12 
3 
1 
1 
1 
4 

9 
10 

4 
4 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
4 
7 

6^ 
3 
6 

18 



6 
1 
2 

318 



T H K F O L 1. O W I N (i 

SUKGICAL OPERATIONS WERE PERFORMED 

From Feljruary 1st, 18G1, to February 1st, 1862. 

Amputation of Arm .' 3 

of Foot 4 

of both Feet: 1 

of Thigh 2 

of Toes 1 

Autoplastic operations 2 

Cataract (for) 2 

Entropion (for) j- , 1 

Extirpation of Mammas 3 

" of Testicle 1 

'* of Tumors 7 

Fistula in Ano (for) 4 

" in Perineo (for) 1 

Fissura Ani (for) 1 

Hernia (for) 1 

Hydrocele (for) 10 

Hydrosarcoccle (for) .. 1 

Lithotomy 2 

Malformation of Fingers (for) 1 

Necrosis (for) 2 

Paracentesis Abdominis 5 

Paronychia (for) 3 

Phymosis (for) 5 

Removal of foreign body from Air Passages 2 

Staphyloma (for) 1 

Strabismus (for) 1 

Talipes Varus (for)....! 3 

Trephining 1 

Varicose Veins (for) 1 



Catalogue of IHatrituhtts, 

Session 1861 -62. 



N.AMES. 


PRECEPTORS. 


RESIDENCE. 


Beatty, George D. 


Dr. F. Donaldson, 


Maryland. 


Benson, Philander V. 


Dr. G. W. Benson, 


Maryland . 


Benzinger, Joseph C. 


Dr. L. S. Eichelberger, 


Maryland. 


Billingslea, J. Howell 


Dr. J. L. Billingslea, 


Maryland. 


Bird, Benj. L. 


Dr. Bird, 


Maryland. 


Bohanan, Jas. L. 




Maryland. 


Bolton, John H. 




Kentucky. 


Booker, Thos. N. 


Dr. Bordley, 


Maryland. 


Borck, Math. Adolph. Edw 


. Dr. J. Dwinelle, 


Maryland. 


Broadbent, Wm. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. : 


Buhrrnan, Harvey 


Dr. L. Wachter, 


Maryland. ^ 


Burch, James C. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. ; 


Burgess, Lloyd D. 


Dr. Thos. Burgess, 


Maryland. ' 


Campbell, B. J. 


Dr. McMeal, 


Maryland. 


Oarlin, Jas. L. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. | 


Carroll, C. A. 


Dr. C. Johnston, 


Maryland. ' • 


Chew, John H. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. ! 


Clagett, Robert 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. ! ' 


Conner, John A. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Cohen, H. M., M. D. 


University of Mary'ld 1848 


, Virginia. |l| 


Cooke, Oetavius A. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. H 


Corse, George F. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. « 


Cuddy, J. W. C. 


Dr. J. R. Nelson, 


Maryland. !■! 


Davis, W. Wilkens 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. K 


Deale, James N. 


Dr. R. Franklin, 


Maryland. H 


Dohme, Gustavus 


Dr. Hering 


Maryland. |V 


Dorsey, Julius 0. 


Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar, 


Maryland. [■: 


Punlap, Albert 




Maryland ■ 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



n 



Eckerman, Alexander 
Ensor, Joshua F. 
Everett, W. B. 
Fairbank, Samuel 
Fisher, Greorge M. 
Foreman, E. K. 
Frank, Samuel L. 
Freeny, G. W. 
Frush, M. F. 
Gibbons, Edwin P. 

Goldsborough, Charles W. 

Gordon, Basil F. 
Greenley, William 

Grove, F. A. 

Harris, J). 
Harris, John C, 
Harrison, Wm. G., Jr., 
Hartman, Wilton H. 
Hirst, H. T. 
Holland, John H. 
Holmes, J. E. 
Hopkins, Arundel 
Inloes, Henry A. Jr., 
Janney Edward W. 
Johnston, 0. M. 
Keller, Jonah G. 
Kemp, H. Clay 
Kemp, J. McKendree 
Kemp, W. T 

I Kinzer, Thomas 0. 

Knight, Louis W. 

I Mackenzie, George B. 

Magrudcr, J. W. 
Mansfield, Richard W. 
Martin, Charles M, 
Martin, John H. 



Dr. E. G. Cox, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. C. E. Tarr, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. C. Humphreys, 
Dr. Monkur, 
Dr. D. McLaughlin, 

)Dr. Goldsborough, and 
Drs Butler and Chew, 
Prof. N. R.Smith, 
Dr. Reynolds, 
f Dr. T. J. Grove, and 
I Drs. Butler and Chew, 

Dr. Wm. Maxwell, 
Dr. F. Donaldson, 



Dr. C. M. Newman, 
Dr. F. R. Smith, 
Prof. N. R. Smith. 
Dr. F. Donaldson, 
Dr. Daniel Janney, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. J. P. Fleming, 
Dr. Wm. Denny, 
Dr. J. S. Kemp, 
Dr. W. N. Pindell, 

iDr. S. G. Kinzer, and 
Drs Butler and Chew, 
Dr. S. T. Knight, 
f Prof. Smith and Dr. 
\ Mackenzie, 
Dr. William B. Magruder, 

Dr. Wm. A. Matthias, 
Drs. Morgan and Elliott, 



Germany. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. • 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



18 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



McGill, Samuel 
McKnew. W. R. 
McMeal, Daniel 
Mitchell, A. B. 
Morgan, William P. 
Morrison, George W. 
Murphy, Samuel W. 
Myers, Edward W. 
Nicolassen, Gr. A. 
Nixon, Alfred C. 
Noel, Agideoua 
•Ould, Elisha R. 
Owings, J. H., Jr., M. D. 
Payne, Josiah T. 
Piek, Aug. Theodore, 

Pierce, H. Lindsley 

Price, Richard E. 
Ridgely, Nicholas G-. 
Rippard, William H. 
Robinson, John B. 
Rowe, W. B. 
Royer, Levi 
Shoemaker, P]. B. S. 
Shure, C. A. 
Simmons, A. T. 
Smith, Francis J, 
Smith, W. P. 
Simpson, Edwin B. 
Stevenson, John M. 
Stinnecke, H. A. 
Stone, Wra. H. 
Saxton, A. H. 
Thompson, John W. 
Tobey, Nathan D. 
Trautman, C. Theodora 
Trippe, Edward R. 

Trumbo, George H. 
Urie, William T. 



Dr T. J. McGill, 
Drs. Butler and Chow, 
Dr. McMeal, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. McLaughlin, 
Dr. L. Frink, 
Dr. J E. Healy, 
Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar, 
Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar. 
Dr. Pfeiffer, 
Dr. 0. Johnston, 

, University of Md., 18G1, 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 
Dr. Piek, 

( Dr. Yeates, and Drs. 

\ Butler and Chew, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof N. R. Smith, 
Drs. Stokes nnd Monkur, 
Dr. James Bordley, 
Dr. H. D. Mitchell, 
Dr. S. L. Swormsted, 
Dr. Thos. B. Evans, 
Dr. J. Sappington, 

Drs. C.J. and J. F. Smithy 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr, S. W. Simpson, 
Dr. J S. Stevenson, 
Dr. F. Donaldson, 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 

Dr. J. P. Mackenzie, 
Dr F. R. Smith, 
Dr. F. E. B. Hintze, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 

I Dr. Hering, and Drs. 

I Butler and Chew, 

I Prof. Smith and Dr. 

I Whaglan, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Pennsylvania 

Mar)' land. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland 
Cuba. 

, Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland . 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



19 



Vallandigham, Irving S, 
Vannort, E. A. 
Warfield, James H. H 
Watt, James 
Watts, Heury R. 
Wells, Charles A. 
Wheeler, Wm. B. 
' White, GideoD 
Whitridge, William 
Worthington, George C. 
Yingling, George S. 
Zeigler, Asa H. 



Dr. C. Baxley, Delaware. 

Dr. M. Johns, Maryland. 

Dr. Worthington, Maryland. 

Dr. Montgomery, Maryland. 

Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar, Maryland. 

Drs. Butler and Chew, Maryland. 

Dr. H. E. Beltz, Maryland. 

Dr. Monkur, Maryland. 

Prof. N. R. Smith. Maryland. 

Dr. Worthington, Maryland. 

Baltimore Infirmary, Maryland. 

Dr. L. T. Hipsley, Maryland, 



V', 



4^ 



aRADTJA.TES 



At the Annual Commencement held March, ISQl, the following Candi- 
dates received the Degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



Samuel Adams,' 
W. H. H. Adkisson/ 
W. 11. Ecnson, - . 
J. E. Beatty, * . 
W. S. Blakistone^V 
R. H. E. Boteler,* 
R. C. Bowles, ', . 
Samuel Boyle, < . 
Horace A. Brooks, ^ 
N. B. Bryan, ' 
Franklin A. Bushay,/ 
F. E. Chatard, Jr., 
Charles Combs, 
John N. Coonan, 
Charles H. Diggs, 
Alexander E. Edwards 
R. Emory, < . 
Augustus F. Erick*, 
D. L. Fleming, 
B. F. Garr, 
H. W. Gardner, 
W. F. Gill, 
Francis Gillam, 
Theodore Glocker, 
L. E. Gott, V 
J. Milton Gouldin,\ 
Lawrence B. Hoffman, 



Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Alabama. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Bermuda. 
Maryland. 
Pennsylv'a. 
Pennsylv'a. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. . 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 
N. Carolina. 
Maryland. 
N. Carolina. 
Maryland. 
D. Columbia. 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 



GRADU ATES 



21 



Randall Holden, ^ . 
E. Lloyd Howard, 
Richard T. Hurt,. 
E. E. Kellam, . . 
Thomas Latimer,/' 
Gr. Byron Lecompte,>^' . 
James E. H. Lewis^ . 
Thos. Gr. Mackenzie,/ 
W. H. Manifold, . 
J. Haines McCullough,; 

B. B. Miles, ^ . 
Louis Monmonier,^ 
Charles M. Morfit, / . 

C. F. M. Neilson, 
H. C. Nelson, K • 
Jeremiah Nichols, -- 
Geo. E. R. Owens,* 
Jno. H. Owings,^ 

W. Cooper Pennington, ' 
Samuel F. Powell,; 
A. H. Price, - 
David Riley, 
W. N. Sanders, ^ . 
Alan P. Smith,/ . 
Charles Spath,/ . 
W. B. Stokes,, . 
J. M. K. Sullivan,. 
James A. Templeman,' 
I. Davis Thomson, : 
John Thomas Tucker,* 
John R. Uhler, 
Daniel Weisel, 
JohnH. R. Wolfe, 
Wm. Woodward, 
Edward Wootton, i 
R. 0. Wyatt, / 



RESIDENCE. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Pennsylv'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

N. Carolina. 

Maryland. 

Ireland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 13th of Octo- 
ber, 1862, and close on the 1st of March, 1863. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each ; Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Infirmary as clinical assistants. The fee is one hun- 
dred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement 
of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this .school, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Fa- 
culty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of his 
own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 



FEES, STATUTES, ETC. 23 

school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided,, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desires it ; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
Candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon winch is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as Avell as upon the re- 
sult of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for ex- 
amination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, the 
right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifications 
an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded as 
obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians and 
Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltexbeeger, Dean. 

QCf" Mr. Ftter Smith, the Janitof. icJio may he found at his house on the Uni' 
versiiy grounds, will conduct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses. The expenses of living are as loio in Baltimore as in any city in the 
country — good board being obtained at from $3 ^o $4 per week. 



THE 



BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 




i.s constantly o|)cn for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended hy the Faculty of the Universit}^, and 
nursed hy the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently 
heen erected, containing commodious jorivate apartments sepa- 
rate from the more public portion of the house. Persons from 
a distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find 
the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from tltree to ten dolhirs ^cv week, according to the 
accommodations rerjuired. 

Applications for admission may he made to Dr. Edward F. 
MiLHOLLAXD, Resident Physician. 



^ 



(yMa^iiFiiaifi ©p e/i^bf^^il^m© 



FIFTY-SIXTH 



ANNUAL CIROtn.^R 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 




SESSlOIsT 18 63-64 



J3 A L T 1 M O K K : 

PRINTED BY SHERWOOD c^' CO. 



MDCCCLXIII. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



FIFTY-SIXTH 



ANNUAL ej]RetJLAR 



OF THE 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 



SESSION 1863-64 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES, 



SESSIOKT 1863-63. 



B A L T m R E : 
PRINTED BY^ SHERWOOD & CO 



M D C C CLX I II . 



TEXT BOOKS 



Anatomy and Physiology. — Leidy's Anatomy, G-ray's 
Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, Draper's 
Physiology, Carj)enter's Human Physiology, Kirke's Phys- 
iology. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's MedJcal Cliem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Wome:t and Ciiildhen. — Caz- 
eaux's, Churchill's, Kigby's Midwifery; Wjst's, Evaiisoii^-, 
Condie's Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine.^ — Y7athion's Lectures, 
Williams on Diseases of the Chest, Latham on the Heart, 
Barlow's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — Wood's and Bache's 
Dispensatory, Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Medi- 
ca, Beck's Materia Medica. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 



WM. E. A. AIKIN, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY, 



SAMUEL CHEV^, M. D. 

PROFESfeOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, AND OF 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. 



G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN 



NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

LECTURER ON ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 



RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF THE INSTITUTES OF MEDICINE, AND LECTURER ON MATERIA 
MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 



JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D, 

DEAN. 



OPPICERS OF THE INFIRMARY. 



EDWARD F. MILHOLLAND, M. D Resident Physician. 

SISTER URSULA Sister Superior. 

THEODORE W. GLOCKER, M. D Cli?iical Clerk. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 



GEORGE D. BEATTY, CHARLES M. MARTL\, 

JOSEPH G. BENZINGER, THOS. 0. KINZER, 

CHAS. W. GOLDSBOROUGH, ALEX. H. SAXTON, 

JAMES H. WARFIELD. 



Anniial Circular 



The fifty-sixth session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 19th 
of Octoher, 1863, and end on the 1st of March, 1864. 

In their Annual Circular, the Faculty desire to submit to 
their professional brethren, and to the public generally, as 
they have done on former occasions, a brief exposition of 
their views, wishes and expectations, in the conduct of the 
Institution committed to their charge. 

Their design is to furnish such a course of Instruction as 
they consider best adapted to be useful to those who are pre- 
paring to enter upon the duties of the Medical Profession. 
In order to accomplish this object, their lessons consist prin- 
cipally of a review of the elementary facts of the Science of 
Medicine, and of the obvious and admitted doctrines and 
precepts derived from those facts. They bestow no time or 
attention upon fanciful theories, speculations and conjectures, 
the opinionum commentaj which may be true or may be false. 
Such subjects are selected as are deemed of most importance 
from their practical utility, and the understanding of which 
will best serve to enlighten the pupil in his future exertions 
to extend the bounds of his professional acquirements. The 
paramount effort through every part of the course, is to give 
that kind and that measure of knowledge, and that training 
and discipline of mind, which will best qualify the young 
physician to commence with safety the treatment of diseases, 
and will also best prepare him to derive from his own obser- 
vation and experience the clinical skill and sagacity which 
in their highest degree can never be learned from teachers. 



b ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

The important truth is recognized and ever kept in view, 
that the most valuable portion of all preliminary education 
is that which prepares the pupil to become his own instructor. 

In addition to their course of lectures, and as subsidiary to 
that course, the Faculty are -in the habit of holding during 
the session weekly examinations in their respective depart- 
ments, which the students are advised, though not required, 
to attend. The utility of these examinations is abundantly 
manifest. They serve as a thorough and exact review of the 
subjects which have been recently discussed. They afford 
opportunities for rectifying any errors or misapprehensions 
which may have occurred to the pupil while listening, or 
while neglecting to listen, to the lecture. And they also 
stimulate the student to increased attention and exertion. 
The facts and doctrines of the lectures become more interest- 
ing to him when he knows that his acquaintance with them 
will speedily be subjected to a public test. A spirit of emu- 
lation is thus diffused through the class, and all are more 
or less benefited who are capable of deriving pleasure from 
the manifestation of knowledge, or of feeling shame from 
the exposure of ignorance. 

Impressed with the advantages to be derived from the use 
of models, paintings, preparations, and other means for illus- 
trating their oral instruction, the Faculty have imported 
from Paris a number of models of a size larger than life, 
showing the various parts of the human body in health and 
disease, and illustrating the courses on Surgery, Practice of 
Medicine, and Anatomy and Physiology. The advantages 
which these, in conjunction with a large number of paint- 
ings, diagrams, and wet and dry preparations, offer to the 
student, are inestimable ; and although they do not take the 
place of actual demonstrations from the dead and living 
subject, they nevertheless are accessories, which tend greatly 
to elucidate and simplify the matters under discussion. In 
addition to the above, the cabinet of Materia Medica has 
recently been brought to a high degree of perfection, and 
the Chemical and Physical Apparatus, which has always 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

been ample, is constantly receiving sucli accessions as the 
state of the science may require. 

The Museum, ever an object of anxious care to the Faculty, 
has recently been augmented by the addition of a number of 
valuable skulls and other osteological specimens, from various 
animals, and still further accessions in specimens illustra- 
tive of both healthy and diseased conditions, will constantly 
be made^ — -the Faculty being able, from the advantages at 
their command, to secure many valuable illustrations in 
Normal and Pathological Anatomy. 

For the purpose of Clinical instruction, the School enjoys 
the inestimable advantage of possessing a capacious hospital 
of its own. The Baltimore Infirmary, in the immediate 
vicinity of the College, has been greatly enlarged by the 
present Faculty, and is under their sole charge and control. 
This institution contains a hundred and fifty beds, and 
receives into its wards every variety of acute and chronic 
diseases, thus furnishing an abundant and never-failing sup- 
ply of cases for Clinical study. During the sessions daily 
instruction is given at the bed-sides by the Professors of Sur- 
gery and of the Principles and Practice of Medicine ; and this 
system of teaching is continued through the remainder of the 
year by other members of the Faculty, for the benefit of all 
matriculates of the School who choose to attend. Of the 
utility and indeed indispensable necessity of Clinical training 
as a part of medical education, the Faculty are thoroughly 
aware. They furnish it without charge ; they advise and 
exhort their pupils to frequent the wards, and observe for 
themselves the character and treatment of diseases ; and they 
admit to examination no candidate for graduation unless he 
produce evidence of his attendance at the hospital. 

Particular attention will be given to the important subject 
of Military Surgery by the Professor of Surgery, and to 
Military Hygiene by the Professor of the Institutes. 

The facilities afforded by the School for the study of Prac- 
tical Anatomy are all that the most diligent and zealous 
student can desire. Anatomical subjects are supplied in 



8 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

abundance, and at moderate expense. The rooms are open 
from the beginning of October; and, as they are lighted with 
gas, dissection can be pursued in the evening as well as 
during the day. 

The science of Physiology, a knowledge of which is so 
essential to the physician — who cannot intelligently treat 
derangements of the functional operations of the organs of 
the body till he is acquainted with the healthy actions of 
these organs — is taught not only orally, but by means of 
actual experiments before the class. In this manner the 
various functions of the organism and the secretions and 
excretions of the body are prominently and effectively shown. 
The instruction given in the lectures and examinations, 
and in the wards of the hospital, constitute an important 
part, but yet only apart, of medical education. Much in 
addition must be done for the student by his private pre- 
ceptor, and much must be done by himself. He must read 
diligently, and with judicious selection of books ; and he 
must learn to reflect and meditate on what he reads, and 
hears, and sees. He must learn to assist himself, or he can 
never be effectually assisted by others. Mental power and cul- 
ture cannot be imparted by pouring knowledge into vacant 
and inactive minds. The mind that cannot or will not think, 
can never be improved by being made the passive recipient 
of the thoughts of others. The results of medical education 
depend not barely upon the quantity and quality of the 
instruction given, and the ability of the instructors who give 
it, but also, and in a much larger measure, upon the char- 
acter of the pupils — what they are by nature, and what they 
have been made by the training, good or evil, to which they 
were subjected before they entered the halls of a Medical 
School. Of those who resort to Medical Schools, some are 
qualified by natural abilities and by preliminary education 
to be far more easily, more rapidly, and more higlily im- 
proved than others. But there are few or none who may 
not, by diligent and persevering study, and by exerting to 
the utmost such talents as they possess, obtain a degree of 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. y 

intelligence and knowledge which will give them the right 
to expect success in life, by giving them the power to be- 
useful to the community. Where failure in the quest of 
medical knowledge is signal and entire, it may be ascribed 
in almost all cases rather to the fault or misfortune of the 
pupil than to the neglect or incapacity of his teachers. 

Diligence and industry on the part of pupils cannot be 
enforced by medical teachers. The age and position of 
Students of Medicine prohibit the employment of compulsory 
means. The Medical Faculty of the University of Maryland 
endeavor to exert over the young gentlemen entrusted to 
their care a friendly and salutary influence, not only in 
relation to their professional studies, but also as respects 
their moral character. They require regular attendance, 
attention, and decorum in the lecture rooms ; they ascertain 
by frequent examination the industry and proficiency of 
each member of the class ; and they announce in their 
statutes that after the final examination of each candidate 
for graduation, the result of his case is determined by refer- 
ence to his moral as well as his intellectual qualifications^ — 
by regard to what he is, as well as to what he knows. 

The Faculty endeavor to be mindful on all occasions of 
their obligations to the Medical Profession, to their pupils, 
and to the community. They seek to promote the best 
interests of the Profession, and to maintain its ancient 
respectability and dignity, by exerting their utmost ability 
to improve the intellect and elevate the sentiments of the 
young cadets who are entering its ranks. And they desire 
to render good service to the commonweal, by doing their 
part in so educating the rising generation of physicians as 
will qualify them to perform usefully, benevolently, and 
honorably, the duties of their vocation. 

In relation to themselves, the Faculty may be allowed to 
refer to the diligence and industry which they have exerted 
in the pursuit of their business as teachers of medicine — 
humble merits which will be acknowledged and attested by 
all who have been their pupils. They propose to continue 



10 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

their efforts with unahated energy ; and there is nothing that 
gives them more encouragement in their labors than to 
observe the well-earned success and reputation of a large 
proportion of the large number of physicians who have been 
educated under their care. To them and to all the Alumni 
of the School, they pledge themselves to use all proper means 
for advancing the reputation and extending the usefulness 
of their Alma Mater. 

By order of the Faculty, 

Gr. W. MiLTENBERGER, M. D., Demi. 

Baltimore, July 1, 1863. 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

Treated in the Medical Department of the Baltimore Infirmary, 

From February 1st, 1862, to February 1st, 1863. 



DISEASES. 



Amenorrhoea 

Angina Diffusa 

Angina Pectoris 

Apoplexy 

Asthma 

Briglit's Disease 

Bronchitis, Acute 

Bronchitis, Chronic 

Chorea 

Chlorosis 

Cholera Morbus 

Cirrhosis of Liver 

Colica Pictonuni 

Delirium Tremens 

Dementia 

Diarrhoea, Acute 

Diarrhoea, Chronic 

Diphtheria 

Dropsy , 

Anasarca 

Ascites 

Renal 

Dysentery, Acute 

Dysentery, Chronic... 

Dysmenorrhasa 

Dyspepsia 

Endocarditis 

Emphysema of Lungs. 
Enlargement of Spleen 

Enteritis 

Fever 

Intermittent 



1 

19 

14 

2 

2 



4 
10 

2 

2 
12 

1 



1 

37 



>- 






"^ in 




o 


R S 




•z. 


is 


c 


'< 


3 « 


w 


u 


^ 


c 


« 




1 


1 
1 




1 


3 
1 




1 






2 






1 




2 






2 




1 
1 




3 


1 
3 


1 
i 


2 


1 
1 


i 
1 


2 


1 



1 

4 
1 

1 
2 
3 

12 
5 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 

21 
3 

15 



1 
3 
5 

12 
3 
2 

14 
1 
2 
1 
1 

40 



12 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 



DISEASES. 


c 

K 


> 


u 

1 1 


a 

a 

a 


6 

S 
p. 

a 


< 


Fever Remittent 


6 
42 

2 
1 

1 
1 

2 
1 

1 
2 

1 
3 
1 
3 

2 

1 

2 
12 

1 

30 
4 
3 

2 
2 

1 
5 


1 

f 

1 
1 

2 
2 

1 ' 

2 

15 

1 

3 

2 

1 


1 


9 

2 

1 
3 
1 
1 

2 

9 

2 
1 

2 
1 


1 

3 

2 

6 

2 
1 

2 
1 

1 
1 


6 


Typhoid 

Typhus 


51 
2 


Gastritis 

Grout .. 


3 
1 


Haemateinesis 


1 


Heart, functional disease of,... 

Heart, valvular disease of 

Hydro-Pneumo-Thorax 


2 

6 
2 


Hepatitis 


4 


Hysteria 


2 


Incontinence of Urine 


1 


Laryngitis 


3 


Leucorrhcea 


2 


Lumbago 


1 


Neuralgia 

Parotitis 


5 

1 


Parotidaea Cynanche 


8 


Paralysis General 


3 


Hemiplegia 


i 


Parapleo'ia 


2 


Peritonitis 


1 


Phthisis 


30 


Pleuritis 


5 


Pneumonia 


15 


Poisoninsf 


2 


Prolapsus Uteri 


3 


Rheumatism, Acute .. 


32 


Rheumatism, Chronic 


7 


Rubeola 


3 


Scarlatina 


4 


Scorbutus 


2 


Small-Pox 


1 


Struma 


4 


Tonsillitis 


6 




258 


48 


5 


47 


35 


393 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

Treated in the Surgical Department of tlie Baltimore Infirmary, 

From February 1st, 1862, till February 1st, 1863, 



DISEASES. 



Abscess .. .. 
Amaurosis , 
Anthrax ... 
Arthrocace 



13 

1 

1 
o 



Balanitis 2 



Burns 

Broncbocele 

Calculus , Renal 

Carcinoma of the Rectum 

Caries 

Cataract 

Condylomata 

Concussion of Brain 

Conjunctivitis; Acute 

Contusion 

Coxalgia 

Cysti tis 

Ecthyma 

Ectropion 

Eczem a 

Elephantiasis 

Epithelioma 

Erysipelas 

Erythema 

Exostosis 

Fistula in Ano 

" Lachrymalis 

" in Perineo 

" Urethrtie 

' ' Vesico- Vaginal 

Fracture of Femur 

" of Humerus 

" of Metatarsal Bones... 

" of Inferior Maxillary.. 
of Patella 

" of Tibia 

" of Sacrum 

'' of Femur Com 

^' of Skull 

" of Radius and Ulna 

Comp 

of Tibia and Fibula... 



i I 



15 
4 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
4 
2 
3 
4 
1 
5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 

2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 

1 

5 



14 



LIST OF CASES TREATED. 



DISEASES 



Gonorrhoea 

Haemorrhoids 

Haematocele 

Haeniatodes Fungus 

Hernia 

Hydatid of Breast 

Hydrocele 

Injury 

Iritis 

Luxation of Humerus 

Necrosis 

Ophthalmia, Gonorrhoeal 

" Strumous 

Orchitis 

Osteo Sarcoma 

Otorrhoea 

Paronychia 

Pernio 

Periostitis 

Phlegmon 

Purpura 

Prolapsus Ani 

Psoriasis 

Pyaemia 

Rupia 

Sarcocele 

Scirrhus 

Spinal Irritation 

Staphyloma 

Strabismus 

Stricture of Urethra 

Synovitis 

Syphilis 

Tumors 

Talipes 

Ulcers 

Varicocele 

Varicose Veins 

Wounds, gunshot 

*' incised 

" lacerated 







>- 






sa 












a <» 






M « 


a 


u 


s 1 


« 


^ 


S s 


o 


K 


« 


19 






'> 












1 


1 




1 


2 




1 






8 






9 






*> 












>} 












4 






1 






1 






5 






1 






1 






3 






2 






3 


3 




1 






1 






2 


1 




3 






2 


1 




1 






1 






1 






5 






3 






53 






4 








1 


1 


18 


1 




1 


1 




3 






2 






1 






239 


21 


4 



21 



27 312 



THE F C) T^ T. O W I N G 

SURaiCAL OPERATIONS WERE PERFORMED 

From February 1st, 1863, to February 1st, 1863. 



Amputation of Arm 3 

" of Finger 8 

of Hand 1 

of Leg 1 

of Thigh 3 

of Toes 3 

' ' of Penis , 1 

Cataract, operation for 4 

v'ic;ii!-ix fro.u ims-ii. vir> r;;:!');! fr.r 1 

;'ctr<;[)ii>ii, o|) r;iTiiMi to;- ] 

Extirpation of Ilydutid of ]^;-(>;:^^r 1 

of yhiiuuii^2 '2 

" cm' 'ru;iiorr: o 

Fistula ill Alio, operati I) for 4 

iiaroin. '• - 1 

'Ivdroctdo, " " ^> 

Jjithotuai} 2 

Necrosis of Sternum , operation for 1 

" of Tibia, - 1 

Osteosarcoma, " 1 

Paracentesis Abdominis 3 

Phymosis, operacion for 6 

Prolapsus Aui, " 1 

Reduction of Dislocated Humerus 2 

Staphyloma, operation for 1 

Strabismus, " " 1 

Talipes, " " 1 

Tracheotomy 2 

Varicocele, operation for 1 

Vesico-Vaginal Fistula, operation for 1 



Session 1862-63 



Beatty, George D. 

Beltz, Theodore H. 
Benzinger, Joseph C 
Billingslea, J. H. 
Bohanan, James L. 
Booker, Thomas N. 
Borck, M. A. E. 
Broadbent, Wm. 
Brown, George H. 
Bussey, H. G. 
Gairnes, G. H. 
Carroll, 0. A. 
Carter, James M. 
Chew, John H. 
Clagett, Robert G. 
Cooley, John 
Cooper, Wm. H. 
Corse, George F. 
Cruikshank, James A. 
Cuddy, J. W. C. 
Davison, Garland H. 
Deale, James N. 
Dodge, A. W. 
Dorsey, Julius 0. 
Downes, Wm. H. 
Dunlap, Albert 
Esgate, John 
Ewell, A. D. F. 



PRECEPTORS. 

r Baltimore Infirmary, 
I and Dr. F. Donaldson, 
Dr. H. E. Beltz, 
Dr. L. S. Eichelber^er, 
Dr. J L. Billingslea, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Drs. Smith and Bordley, 
Dr. Dwinelle, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. E. T. Brown, 
Dr. Bussey, 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 
Dr. C. Johnston, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 
Dr. Elliott, 
Dr. G. G. Harman, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. J. A. Perkins, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. R. Franklin, 
Dr. J. J. Hunt, 
Dr. Dunbar, 
Dr. L. H. Beatty, 



Dr. Leatherbury, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Pennsylvania, 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Delaware. 
Maryland* 
Louisiana* 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
New York. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Virginia. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



17 



Fawcett, Christopher 
Frush, Moreau F. 
Fulks, James S. 
Geiger, J. J. G. 
Gerry, W. R. 

Goldsborough, Chas. W. 

Gorgas, F. J. G. 
Groves, Benjamin B. 
Harper, Isaac S. 
Harrison, Wm. G., Jr. 
Holmes, Byron H. 
Holmes, J. E. 
Hopkins, Arundel 
Inloes, Henry A., Jr. 
Janney, E. W. 
Jarrett, Martin L. 
Johnson, John D. M. D. 
Keedy, Samuel H. 
Keener, Charles H 
Keller, Josiah G. 
Kelly, John J. 
Kemp, H. Clay 
Kemp, J. McK. 
Kemp, W. T. 
Kinkelin, Arnold H. 
Kinzer, Thomas 0. 
Knight, L. W. 
Knowles, Gustavus W. 
Lamb, C. W. 
Landers, Thomas, 
Le Cato, George W. 
Lowe, Gideon 
Mahon, James S. 
Mansfield, R. W. 
Martin, Charles M. 
Maughlin, Hugh A. 
McElderry, Henry 
Mehring, A. B. 
Monmonier, Louis A. 
o 



L^nion Protestant Infirmary, 



Dr. Geiger, 

Dr. A. A. Lynch, 

[Baltimore Infirmary and 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 
Dr. C. Johnston, 
Dr. J. L. Yenzey, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. F. Donaldson, 

Dr. F. R. Smith, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. F. Donaldson, 
Dr. D. Janney, 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 

Dr. J. D. Keedy, 

Dr. J. P. Fleming, 
Dr. Wm. Patterson, 
Dr. Denny, 
Dr. J. S. Kemp, 
Dr. Wm. N. Pindeil, 
Dr. Huet, 

Baltimore Infirmary, 
Dr. S. T. Knight, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. Wm. White, 
Dr. E. W. LeCato, 
Dr. F. Donaldson, 

Dr. Charles Jones, 
Baltimore Infirmary, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. Chas. N. Bradford, 



Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Virginia. 

Maryland. 

New York. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virijinia. 

Florida. 

Pennsylvania. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



18 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



Mudd, Joseph A. 


Dr. G. D. Mudd, 


Maryland. 


Neff, Charles W. 


Dr. J. M. Porter, 


Maryland 


Nelson, G.W. H. 


Dr. E. H. Perkins, 


Maryland. 


Nicols, P. E. N. 


Dr. C. Johnston, 


Maryland. 


Nixon, Alfred C. 


Dr. Dunbar, 


N. Carolina. 


Piek, A. T. 


Dr. Charles H. Piek, 


Maryland. 


Price, James H 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Reid, Elijah M. 


Dr. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Richardson, Henry 


Dr. Wm. Claytor, 


Maryland. 


Rippard, Wm. H. 




Maryland. 


Roberts, Charles E. 


Dr. G. C. M. Roberts, 


Maryland. 


Robertson, Wm. W. 


Dr. Dorsey, 


Maryland. 


Rutter, Alexander 


Dr. Wm. H. Baltzell, 


Maryland. 


Saxton, Alexander H. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Seth, James, Jr. 




Maryland. 


Shaw, Frank T. 


Dr. Benson, 


Maryland. 


Shueey, Joseph R. 


Dr. E. L. Brown, 


Maryland. 


Stenson, J. F. 




Maryland. 


Smith, T. Emory 


Dr. Wm. H. Baltzell, 


Maryland. 


Smith, Walter R. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Stone, D. Edwin 




Maryland. 


Stone, Wm. H. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. 


Symington, John, Jr. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Thomas, J. F. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. 


Thruston, H. Scott 


Dr. S. P. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Titcomb, Bernard 




Maryland. 


Tobey, Nathan D. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. 


Urie, Wm. T. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Warfield, J. H. H. 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland. 


Watts, Henry R. 


Dr. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Watts, James 


Dr. Montgomery, 


Maryland. 


Weaver, John F. B. 


Dr. H. E. Beltz, 


Maryland. 


Weedon, J H. W. G. 


Dr. Wm. Denny, 


Maryland. 


Weems, Julius B. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. 


West, Theodore S. 


Dr. C. M. Chancellor, 


Virginia. 


Zimmerman, Luther M. 


Dr. Wagner, 


Maryland. 



'0 -J 



i 






At the Annual Commencement held March 7, 1863, the following 
Candidates received the Degree of Doctor in Medicine. 



JNA.MbO. 

Beatty, Greorge D. '-^ 










Maryland. 


Beltz, Theodore H. f 










Maryland. 


Benzinger, Jos. C. /- 










Maryland. 


Bohanan, Jas. S. »- 










Maryland. 


Booker, Thomas N.* 










Maryland. 


Borck, E. A. M., Jr. 










Maryland. 


Broadbent, Wm. , 










Maryland. 


Chew, John H. 










Maryland. 


Clagett, Robert Gr. ; . 










Maryland. 


Cuddy, John W. C. , 










Maryland. 


Deale, James N. 










Maryland. 


Dorsey, Julius 0. ^ 










Maryland. 


Frush, Moreau F. 










Maryland 


Geiger, Jno. D. Gr. t» 








Maryland. 


Groldsborough, Chas. W* 








Maryland. 


Gorgas, Ferdinand J. S^ 








Maryland 


Holmes, Jeremiah E. ^ 








Maryland. 


Hopkins, Arundel ^ 








Maryland. 


Janney, Edward W. ;. 








Virginia. 


Keller, Josiah G. u 








Maryland 


Kemp, W. Thos. U 








Maryland 


Kemp, Henry Clay ^^ 








Maryland 


Kemp, J. McKendree l^' 








Maryland 


Kinzer, Thomas Oscar* 








Maryland 


Lamb, Charles W. i 










Maryland 



20 



GRADUATES 



NAMES. 

Martin, Charles M.^ 
Nixoiij Alfred C. 
Piek, Augustus T. • 
Rippard, Wni. H. i 
Saxton, Alex. H. i 
Smith, Walter P. , 
Stenson, J. Fenwick^ 
Thomas. Jos. Ford Ir 
Tobey, Nathan D. t 
Urie, William T. 
Watts, James V 

Warfield, Jas. H. H.- 



RESIEENCB ,. 

Maryland. 
N. Carolina. 
Maryland 
Maryland, 
Maryland, 
.Maryland, 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland, 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland, 



/ 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 19th of Octo- 
ber, 1863, and close on the 1st of March, 1864. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Princij^les and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each ; Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Infirmary as clinical assistants. The iee is one hun- 
dred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

S i:^ A T U T E S . 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matricula- 
tion and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commence- 
ment of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of 
his own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught in 
this School. He must also produce evidence of attendance, 
during one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical 
Medicine. 



22 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desire it; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the re- 
sult of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for 
examination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise, 
the right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifica- 
tions an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded 
as obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians 
and Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltenberger, Dean. 



Mr. Peter Smithy the Janitor^ who may he found at his house on the University 
grounds^ will conduct gerUlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The 
expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the country — good board 
obtained at from $3 to $4 per week. 






T KC E 



BAiLTIMORE INFIRMARY 




Is CDiistantlv open f^):- the reception an 1 care of the sick. The 
patients arc attended Ly the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An additi(.n lias recently 
been erected, containing commodious private apartments sepa- 
rate from the more puhlic portion of the house. Persons from 
a distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will 
find the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the 
accommodations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. Edward F. 
MiLHOLLAND, Resident Physician. 



. 1 



A^A^^.>^^ 



>AAa i **i *i i i i i i * t « * i i II -- il l 



jjMa'^i^sair^ ©? sa^s'jft^M© 



FIFTY-SEVENTH 



A.NIsrU^L CIRCULi^R 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 







SESSIOINT 186<]=-05 



BALTIMORE: 

PRIXTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



M D C C C L X I V 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



FIFTY-SEVENTH 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF T U E 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 



SESSION 1864-65 



AND 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES, 



SESSIOIsT 1863-6^ 



WITH THE GRADUATES OF 1&G2 AND 18G4. 



B A L T OI R E : 
PKINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



MDCCCLXIV. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



Anatomy and Physiology. — Leidy's Anatomy, . G-ray's 
Anatomyj Wilson's Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, Draper's 
Physiology, Carpenter's Human Physiology, Kirke's Phys- 
iology. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children. — Caz- 
eaux's, Churchill's, Kigby's Midwifery ; West's, Evanson's, 
Condie's Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lectures, 
Williams' Principles of Medicine, Latham on the Heart, 
Bennett's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — Wood's and Bache's 
Dispensatory, Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Med- 
ica, Beck's Materia Medica, Stille's Materia Medica and Ther- 
apeutics. 



I 

I 



UNIVERSITY or MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OK SURGERY. 



WM. E. A. AIKIN, M. D., LL. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 



G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN. 



RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, OF HYGIENE AND 
OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. 



CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 



SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 



JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



G. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D. 

DEAN. 



OFFICERS OF THE INFIRMARY. 

EDWARD F. MILHOLLAND, M. D Resident Physician. 

SISTER URSULA Sister Superior. 

JOSEPH C. BENZINGER, M. D Clinical Clerk. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 



ALBERT DUXLAP, J. H. BILLINGSLEA, 

L. A. MONMONIER, H. RICHARDSON, 

A. B. MEHRING, W. W. ROBERTSON, 

JULIUS B. WEEMS. 



A^niiTial Cii^cialax*. 



The fifty-seventh session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 17th 
of Octohcrj 1864, and will end on the 1st of March, 1865. 

The Faculty have the pleasure to announce to their breth- 
ren and to the public generally, that the School of Medicine in 
the University of Maryland is fully prepared for giving the 
most ample course of medical instruction. Since the last 
Circular, all the chairs have been filled, and such preparations 
have been made that every branch will be taught with the 
fullest advantages. No pains will be spared to make the 
students in this College proficients in their profession. Lec- 
tures form a prominent part of the course of instruction, but 
not the only part. The students are urged to attend the ex- 
aminations held regularly by the professors upon the various 
branches, and these examinations are found to be of the 
greatest utility. They impress facts firmly upon the minds 
of the students, and cause them also to give increased atten- 
tion both to the lectures and to their private studies. They 
enforce concentration of thought, and make diligence imper- 
ative. The Faculty have observed the greatest improvement 
in the classes efi'ected by close and systematic examinations 
in the respective departments. 

The course of instruction is illustrated by the use of 
models, paintings, diagrams, w^etanddry preparations, &c., 
many of which have been imported from Europe, while others 
have been prepared, and are still prepared or procured as 
occasion may require, under the supervision of the various 
professors. Each course has its own proper means of illus- 
tration. In the College Museum there is a general collection 



O ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

of Anatomical and Patliological specimens, which are used 
in public teaching, and which the students can examine pri- 
vatel}^ at their leisure. 

In short, all arrangements are carefully made for the full 
illustration of Anatomy and Physiology, of Surgery, of the 
Practice of Medicine, of Obstetrics, of Materia Medica, and 
of Chemistry. The Professor of Materia Medica is now vis- 
iting the great medical schools and hospitals of Paris, Lon- 
don, and Edinburgh, in reference to further improvements in 
this school for the approaching session. 

Yet the course is not made up of didactic lectures, exam- 
inations, illustrations, &c., in the class-rooms. Something 
more is necessary for a complete course of instruction. This 
something is supplied by the large hospital — the Baltimore 
Infirmary — attached to the school. The students have access 
to the wards of this hospital throughout the entire year. 
During the course of lectures, they go daily from the lecture- 
rooms to the wards of the Infirmary, where they can observe 
the reduction of theory to jDractice. All the important ope- 
rations in Surgery are there performed in their presence ; 
and in practical medicine they see the treatment in the civil 
wards of all the indigenous diseases of the country, and in 
the seamen's wards of avast proportion of the diseases which 
originate in the tropics, or in other distant regions. This 
bringing of students into the presence of disease and to the 
application of treatment, carries instruction home to them 
much more forcibly than would be possible from tlie mostelab- 
orate course of mere abstract and theoretic teaching. 

Military Surgery and military Hygiene will continue to 
form a constituent part of the course of instruction. 

The facilities afforded b}^ the school for the study of Prac- 
tical Anatomy are all that the most diligent and zealous stu- 
dent can desire. Anatomical subjects are supplied in abun- 
dance and at moderate expense. The rooms are open from 
the beginning of October, and as they are lighted with gas, 
dissection can be pursued during the appointed hours every 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 7 

The science of Physiology, a knowledge of which is so es- 
sential to the physician, — who cannot intelligently treat de- 
rangements of the functional operations of the organs of the 
body unless he is acquainted with the healthy actions of these 
organs, — is taught not only orally, but by means- of actual 
experiments before the class. In this manner the various 
functions of the organism and the secretions and excretions 
of the body are prominently and effectively shown. 

The Faculty pledge themselves to give to their students 
all facilities and advantages in a degree not surpassed, 
as they believe, by any school in America, but they must re- 
mind the students that professors can perform but a limited 
portion of the work necessary to preparing young men for 
the arduous duties of ,the profession of medicine. The Fac- 
ulty cannot cease to feel a lively interest in the honor and 
good repute of the profession, and especially of such mem- 
bers of it as go from this school. Thc}^ therefore urge upon 
their pupils diligence in study, and that rectitude of moral 
deportment which should ever distinguish the physician and 
the gentleman. They earnestly solicit the co-operation of 
the students with their own endeavors to make them worthy 
and accomplished members of a most honorable profession. 
They exert such influence as they can to inspire their students 
with a laudable ambition to do justice to themselves, to their 
friends, to their preceptors, and ultimately to society at 
large. More than this, the Faculty cannot do. But they 
point with pride to the numerous alumni, who reflect honor 
upon this school from all parts of the Continent. And judg- 
ing from the past, they confidently believe that the young 
men hereafter entrusted to them, w^ith the increased advan- 
j;ages which the school now enjoys, will be equally prepared 
to do credit to the profession and to their Alma Mater. 

By order of the Faculty, 

G. W. MILTENBERGEE, M. D., Dea^i, 

Baltimore, July 24, 1864. 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

Treated in tlie Bledical Department of the Baltimore Infirmary, 

From February 1st, 1863, to February 1st, 1864. 



DISEASES 



Amenorrhcca 

Abscess of Lungs 

Ana3mia 

Angina Pectoris 

Asthma 

Antcversion of Womb- 
Apoplexy 

Bright's Disease 

Bronchitis, Acute 

'< Chronic.... 

Cephalalgia 

Constipatio 

Dehrim-n Tremens 

Dementia 

Debauch 

Debility, General. 

Diarrhoea, Acute 

<' Chronic 

Diptheritis 

Dysmenorrha^a 

Dysentery, Acute 

" Chronic 

Dyspepsia 

Dropsy - 

<' Anasarca 

" Ascites 

" Renal 

Endocarditis 

Epilepsy 

Emphysema of Lungs. 

Epistaxis 

Fever 

" Intermittent 

" Remittent 

" Typhoid 

Gastritis 

Hsematemesis 



31 
6 
2 
1 

12 



13 
6 

21 
5 
4 
1 
5 
2 

17 

3 
1 



55 

33 

22 

6 

1 



O «3 

> p 
o a 



2 

2 

2 

2 

9 

1 

1 

1 
36 
10 

3 

3 
15 

2 
14 

7 
23 
10 

4' 

1 

7 

3 
19 

3 

5 



59 

36 

32 

9 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 



DISEASES. 


Q 
w 

p 




a 

> 

w 

13 


C3 


p 

p 


6 

'A 

< 








2 

3 

2 








9 


llt'iiiicrnnia 


2 









2 


Heart, functional disease of 


3 


" valvular disease of 








2 


Herpes 


2 
2 
1 

2 

1 

2 
2 
2 
2 








2 


Hvpoclirondriasis 













2 


Hyt^teria 


1 


Icterus 










9 


luflainmation of Womb 

Lumbago 








1 


1 
1 


Leucorrhcoa 


1 








3 


Neuralgia 






1 

2 
1 


3 


Neurasthenia 


4 


Parotitis 


1 






3 


Paralysis, Agitans 


1 


" Crucialis 


1 
1 








1 


" Facialis 










1 


" General 


2 
1 

27 




2 




2 


" Hemiplegia 

" Paraple<^ia .1 


1 
8 




3 






2 
4 

1 
1 


Q 


Phthisis 




8 


39 


P( >dagra 

Pleuritis 


1 

4 

13 

2 

2 
58 
.6 


1 

5 


Pneuuomia 






1 


15 


Pneunomia, Pleuro 






2 


Pneunomia, Tvphoid 






1 


7 
3 


5 


Rheumatism, Acute 


65 


" Chronic 






9 


Siriasis 






2 


2 


Splenitis 




1 
1 






1 


Sciatica 


1 
1 
3 






1 


3 


Scarlatina 


3 


Scorbutus 


1 








2 


Small-Pox 


2 






2 


Struma 


2 


1 


2 
1 
2 


7 


Tetan us 


3 


Tonsillitis 


2 




4 












370 


74 


5 


47 


58 


554 



A LIST OF THE DISEASES 

Treated in tlie Surgical Department of tiie Baltimore Infirmary, 

From February 1st, 1863, to February 1st, 1864. 



DISEASES. 


Q 

D 


Q 
W 
> 


BY 

REQUEST. 


1 

Q 




h4 

H 

O 


Abscess 


9 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 






1 


2 


12 


Aniaurosis 


2 


1 




.^ 


Anthrax 






' 2 


Arthrocace 


4 


1 




5 


Balanitis 


' 


2 


Burn 


1 


[ 1 

1 

1 


1 
1 


4 


Calculus, Renal 

Carcinoma of the l^ectum 


3 
1 


Carcinoma of the Uterus 

Caries of the Vertebra? 






1 

2 


Cataract 


2 

'..I.. 


1 
1 




3 


Chemosis 








1 


Conjunctivitis, acute 






1 


6 


" chronic 


2 

1 






2 


Concussion of the Brain 

Coxal 2;ia 




' 


1 
l' 


1 
2 


Condylomata 

Cystitis 


3 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
10 
3 
1 
1 




1 


3 

7 


Ecthyma '' 






1 


Eczema 

Epiphora 

Encysted Sarcoma 

Erythema 







1 


1 


1 

1 
1 
2 


Erysipelas 

Fistula in Ano 


12 
3 


Fistula in Perineo 

Fracture, of Femur 









1 
1 


1 
2 


'•' of Femur, compound.. 








•1 


" of Metacarpal bones... 

" of lower Maxillary 

" of Olecranon 

" of Phalanges 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
9 








1 










1 










1 
1 


of Ribs 








1 


'•' of Radius and Ulna... 
o*f Tibia andFibuh^... 









1 


1 
10 


of Tibia and Fibula, ) 

com p. com j 

of Skull 






2 


2 


1 






1 


" of Vertebrae 


i 




2 
1 




2 


Gangrene. 








1 
2 


2 


Gonorrhoea 


21 


......... j 


! 




23 



LIST OF DISEASES TREATED. 



11 



DISEASES . 


o 


Q 
> 

w ■ 


REMOVED 

BY 
REQUEST. 




6 
y-> 

M 
«5 


< 


Ilare-lip... 

PJ aimorrhoids 

Herpt s Preputialis 

Hydrocele 


3 
5 
3 
4 

1 
88 










8 










2 


7 
3 
4 


Hypopion 

Iniurv'^ 










1 






2 


4 


44 


Iinpeti'"^o 


2 
2 




2 


Iritis , 


3 








2 


Incontinence of Urine 






3 


Luxation of ancle joint 

Luxation of rlumeru? 










1 




1 
1 
2 


3 


Onychia Maligna 

Orchitis 




2 








9 


Ophthalmia. Gonorrhoea 


1 






1 


" Strumous 




2 








4 


Otitis 








1 


Ozcena 








2 
1 


1 


Paronj'diia 









3 


Pernio , 










3 


Periostitis 








1 


Phlebitis 








1 




1 


Phymosis 


1 

1 












Pompholyx 


1 


1 


Polypus of Nose 

Prolapsus Ani 


1 






1 








1 


2 


Prolapsus Uteri 


2 






2 


Prurigo Pollicis 


-l 


2 


Psoriasis 










1 


Pterygium 

Retention of L^rine 










1 










1 


Sarcocele 










1 


Scabies 








1 


2 


Scirrhus 


i" 




1 


3 


Sclerotitis 




1 


1 


Spermatorrhoea 

Stricture 


1 

95 

43 
5 
5 









1 






1 


1 


9 
4 


Synovitis 


Svphili^t 








15 


. no 

1 


Urticaria 






Ulcers 








5 


48 
5 
8 


Tumors 






Wounds, gunshot 




' 


2 










353 


21 ' 


3 


17 


54 


446 



THK FOLLOWINO 

SURGICAL OPERATIONS WERE PERFORMED 

From February 1st, 1863, to February 1st, 1864. 



Amputation of Finger 2 

of Foot 1 

of Thigh , 1 

of Thumb .* 1 

of Toe 3 

of Penis 1 

Cataract, operation for 3 

Extirpation of Mammae 2 

of Testicle 1 

" of Tumors , 9 

" of Scirrlius of Breast 2 

Fistula in Ano, operation for 3 

Harelip, " " 3 

Hydrocele, " " 7 

Lithotomy 2 

Lithotripsy ' 2 

Necrosis of Sternum, operation for 1 

of Tibia, " " 2 

Neuroma, " " 1 

Paracentesis Abdominis 5 

Paraphymosis, operation for 1 

Phymosis, " " 6 

Prolapsus Ani, " " 1 

Polypus Uteri, " " 1 

Polypus of Nose, " " 1 

Reduction of Luxation of Ancle Joint 1 

" *' Humerus 2 

Varicocele, operation for 1 



®Bimll 


(giie 0! HnM, 


Clllat: 


n. 


s 


ession 1863-64. 




NAMES. 


PRECEPTORS. 




RESIDEXCE 


Anderson, Charles D. 


Dr. A. S. Linthicum, 




Maryland 


Atkinson, J. E, 


Prof. X. R. Smith, 




Maryland 


Backus, John S. 


Dr. A. C. Robinson, 




Maryland. 


Barber, Thomas K. 


Dr. P. D. Barber and 
Drs. Butler and Chew, 


■ 


Maryland 


Bates, J. AV. P., M. D. 


Jefferson Medical College, 


Maryland . 


Beans, R. A. 


Dr. Dunbar, 




Virginia. 


Betson, George W. 


Dr. J. A. Holton, 




Maryland. 


Billingslea, James H. 


Baltimore Infirmary and \ 
Dr. J. L. Billingslea, J 


Maryland 


Bird, Benjamin L. 


Prof. X. R. Smith, 




Maryland 


Bobart, Charles 


. 




Maryland 


Booth, William 


Dr. 0. J. Smith, 




Maryland 


Bo wen, Josiah S. 


Dr. Dunbar, 




California. 


Brown, George H. 


Dr. E. L. Brown, 




Maryland. 


Brown, Henr}' C. 


Dr. C. M. Xewman, 




Mar3'land. 


Burch, D. C. 


Dr.G. D. Mudd, 




Maryland. 


Bussey, H. G., Jr. 


Dr. H. G. Bussey, 




Penn'a. 


Cairnes, George H. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 
Dr. D. McMeal, Sr.,1 




]\Iaryland. 


Campbell, B. J. 


Prof McS'ierry and > 
Dr. Yan Bibber, J 




Maryland. 


Carroll, Charles A. 


Prof. X. R. Smith, 




Maryland. 


Carter, James M. 


Prof. X. R. Smith, 




Maryland. 


Chapman, Pearson, Jr. 


Dr. E. Miles, 




Maryland. 


Chapman, B. F. 






Maryland. 


Corse, George F. 


Prof. X. R. Smith, 




Maryland. 


Coskery, Oscar J. 


Dr. F. S. Coskery, 




jNIaryland. 


Claridge, Joseph S. 


Dr. J. S. Stevenson, 




Maine. 


Cruikshank, H. 


Dr. S. Y. Mace, 




^[aryland, 


Cruikshank, James A. 


Prof. X. R. Smith am 


I Dr. Perk 


ins, Louisiana. 


Dashiell, Wm. H. H. 


Dr. C. Dasliiell, 




iMaryland. 



14 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMKS. 


PRKCEPTORS. 


RESIDENCE. 


Davison, Garland H. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


' Maryland 


Dodge, Augustus W. 


Dr. Isaac S. Hunt, 


NewYork 


Donsife, Henry L. 


Dr. Wm. Wagner, 


Maryland 


Downes, Wm. 11., Jr. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland 


Duncan, Edwin S. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Virginia. 


Dunlap, Albert 


Baltimore Infirmary, 


Maryland 


Esgate, John 


Dr. T. K Carroll, 


Maryland 


Evans, W. W. 




Maryland 


Ewell, A. D. F. 


Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van BiW)ei 


, Virginia. 


Fawcett, Christopher 




Maryland 


Free, A. C. 


Dr. E. W. Free, 


Penn'a. 


Fulks, James S. 


Dr. J. G. Linthicum, 


Maryland. 


Gerry, N. R. 


Dr. A. A. Lynch, 


Maryland 


Gibson, Alexander K. 




Maryland 


Gordon, Basil F. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland 


Gorgas, F. I. S., M. 1). 


University of Maryland, 18G3, 


Maryland 


Griffith, Alfred 


Dr. H. S. Streeter, 


Maryland 


Grove, W. R. 


Dr. 0. S. Mahon, 


Maryland 


Groves, B. B. 


Dr. I. L. Veazey, 


Delaware 


Gross, John I., Jr. 


Dr. M. N. Taylor, 


Maryland 


Harper, Isaac S. 


Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Maryland 


Hawkins, I. Weems 




Maryland 


Henry, Robert J. 


Dr. S. H. Henry, 


Maryland 


Infield, Charles 




Penn'a. 


Irons, Edward P. 




Maryland 


Jarrett, Martin L. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. 


Johnson, L. E. 


Dr: G. W. Kemfer, Sr. 


Virginia. 


Jones, George P. 


Dr. I. W. Dashiell, 


Maryland 


Jones, Henry Z. 


Dr. H. E. Betz, 


Maryland 


Keech, Edward P. 




Maryland 


Keedy, Samuel H. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland 


Keene, Samuel J. A. 


Dr. Henry Gross, 


Maryland 


Kelly, John I. 


Drs. McSherry and Van Bibber, 


Maryland 


Kell}", Lewis 


Dr. F. I. Crawford, 


Maryland 


Ker, Samuel H. 


Dr. S. I. S. Kcr, 


Maryland 


King, John T. 


Dr. F, Donaldson, 


Maryland 


Knapp, E. R., M. D. 


LTniversity of Michigan, 


Michigan 


Kugler, Joseph 


Dr. J. H. Carrey, 


Germany. 


Le Cato, G. W. 


Drs. McSherry and Van Bibber,, 


Virginia. 


Lee, William 




Maryland. 


Lanterbach, Robert 


Dr. G. W. Benson, 


Maryland. 


Lauver, Milton A. 


Dr. Wm. N. Martin, 


Maryland. 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



15 



NAMES. 

Mahon, James T, 
Martin, Thos. W., M. D. 
Maughlin, Hugli A. 
McElderry, Henry 
McManiis, S. H. 
McNemar, H. 
McPherson, Maynard 
McSherry, Henry F., M. 1). 

Mehring, A. Buffington,. 

Mitchell, James E. 

Monmunier, Louis A. 

Moran, George H. R. 
Mudcl, Joseph A. 
Neale, Stephen L. D. 
Nelson, G. W. H. 
Nowland, J. A., M. D. 
Pegg, Wm. R. C. 
Pindell, Joseph T. 
Poe, Wm. C. 
Powell, C. C. 
Price, J. H. * 
Rahter, Charles A. 
Reed, W. P. 
Reid, E. Miller 

Richardson, Henry 

l^oberts, Charles E. 

Robertson, Wm. W. 

Robinson, George L. 
Rutter, Alexander 
Shaw, Frank T. 
Shipley, H. C. 
Shoemaker, E. B. S. 
Shucey, Josepli R. 
Simmons, Albert T. 
Smith, Nathaniel S. 
Smith, T. Emory 
Spalding, John T. 



PRECEPTORS. 

Drs. Butler and Chew, 
University of Pennsylvania, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 



Drs. Butler and Chew, 

University of Maryland, 

Balthnnre Infirmary, and 

Prof. McSherry and 

Dr. Van Bibber, 

Dr. F. Donaldson, 

Baltimore Infirmary and 

Drs. Butler and Chew, 

Dr. Rich, 

Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, 

Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, 

Drs. Butler and Chew, 

Dr. E. G. Edwards, 
Dr. John Ridout, 
Drs. Chew and Butler, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. C. W. Benson, 
Dr. F. Floyd, 
Dr. Dunbar, 

Baltimore Infirmary and \ 
Drs. Butler and Chew, J 
Dr. G. C. M. Roberts, 
Baltimore Infirmary and ^ 
Prof. McSherry and V 

Dr. Van Bibber, J 

Dr. A. C. Robinson, 
Dr. Wm. H. Baltzell, 
Dr. Wm. N. Martin, 

Dr. T. B. Evans, 

Prof. N. R. Smith and Dr. Cook, 

Dr. Francis West, 
Dr. Wm. H. Baltzell, 



RESIDENCE. 

Penn'a. 

Maryland. 

]\Iaryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Penn'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

Missouri. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

New York. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Cuba. 

Virginia. 

Maryland 

Maryland. 



16 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMES. 




PRECEPTORS. 


RESDENCE. 


Stewart, Reverdy B. 




Dr. A. Sanders, 


Virginia. 


Stone, D. E. 




Dr. Richardson, 


Maryland. 


Stone, Wm. H. 




Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. 


Tall, Reuben J. H. 




Dr. B. L. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Taneyhill, George H. 




Dr. H." Cooney, 


Ohio. 


Thompson, James F. 




Dr. Wm. M. Abell, 


Maryland. 


Thruston, H. Scutt 




Dr. S. P. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Titcorab, Beriali 




Dr. Dunbar, 


Maryland. 


Tompkins, John C. 




Prof. N. R. Smith, 


Penn'a. 


Wagner, Harrison 




Dr. Wm. H. Wagner. 


Maryland. 


Walshe, Despard M., 


M. D. 




Ireland. 


Watts, Henry Robert 






Maryland. 


Weaver, John F. B. 




Prof. X. R. Smith, 


Maryland. 


Weedon, John H. W 


G. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, 


Maryland. 


Weems, Julius B. 




Baltimore Infirmary and | 
Drs. Butler and Chew, J 


Maryland. 


Weirick, Samuel T. 




Dr. G. S. YingUng, 


Ohio. 


Weisel, Edmund T. 






Maryland. 


White, Caleb B.- 




Prof. ^^. R. Smith and Dr. Duvall, 


Maryland. 


Williams, Denard S. 




Dr. E. W. Free, 


Maryland. 


Wilson, William G., 


M. D. 


University of Maryland, 


Missouri . 


Woodville, Harry 




Drs. John and Riggin Buckler, 


Maryland 


Yourtee, J. T. 




Dr. J. H.Clagett, , 


Maryland. 


Zimmerman, Luther 


M. 


Drs. Butler and Chew, and \ 

T)r Wm. H WjicriiPr 1 


Maryland. 



aR^DUA.TKS 



At the Annual Commencement held March, 1862, the following Candi- 
dates received the Degree of Doctor in Medicine. 

NAME3. RESIDENCR. 

Benson, Pbilaader Y .i Maryland. 

Bolton, I. Henry. k Kentucky. 

Buhrman, Harvey.*'. , , Maryland. 

Burgess, Lloyd D.K Maryland. 

Burch, James C.v Maryland. 

Carlin, James S./. IMaryland. 

Conner, John A..^ Maryland. 

Cook, Octavius A.i;. \ Maryland. 

Ensor, I. Fulton. >. Maryland. 

Everett, W. B .^ Maryland. 

Fairbank, Samuel.*: Maryland. 

Fisher, George M.xi<'. Maryland. 

Foreman, E. Knox.4 Maryland. 

Frank, Samuel Jj.i< Maryland. 

Freeny, Gr. W.a- ". Maryland. 

Gibbons, Edwin P/* Maryland. 

Greenley, William. k^ Maryland. 

Grove, Fullerton A.i-^. Maryland. 

Harris, John C...^. Maryland. 

Holland, John T.A Maryland. 

Johnston, Ovid M/r Penn'a. 

Mackenzie, George B.^.:^ Maryland. 

Magruder, I. Wilson.; Maryland. 

Martin, John H.X Maryland. 

McKnew, W. 11..^ Maryland. 

McMeal, Daniel, Jr.;. Penn'a. 

Morgan, Wilbur P.jV. Virginia, 

2 



18 . GRADUATES. 

NAMES. RESIDENCE. 

Morrison, George W..^ Maryland. 

Myers, Edward W.u , Penn'a. 

Nicolassen, George A.* Maryland. 

Noel, Agideous. .; , . Penn'a . 

Ould, Elisha R. .v. Maryland. 

Payne, Josiah T..» Maryland. 

Pierce, H. Lindsley Virginia. 

Price, Richard E... Maryland. 

Ridgely, Nicholas G Maryland. 

Robinson, John B... < Maryland. 

Rowe, Walter B.., Maryland. 

Shure, Charles A.t Maryland. 

Simpson, Edward B.V Maryland. 

Smith, Francis J..^ Maryland, 

Stevenson, John M.^. Maryland. 

Trautman, C. Theodore.*, Maryland. 

Trippe, Edward R..i Maryland. 

Trumbo, George H./ Maryland. 

Vallandigham, Irving S..|» Delaware. 

Vannort, Ezra Adams. i Maryland. 

Wells, Charles A..*'. Maryland. 

Wheeler, William B../. Maryland. 

Whitridge, William .k. Maryland . 

Yingling, George S./. Maryland. 

Zeigler, Asa H..^ Maryland. 

Note. — This list should have been published in the Circular for 1863, but was 
omitted by an error of arrangement. 



aR^VDU^VTES 



At the Annual Commencement held March, 1864, the following Candi- 
dates received the Degree of Doctor in Medicine. 

N.4MES. RESIDENCE. 

Beans, R. Albert..^ Virginia. 

Billingslea, James H*. Maryland. 

Bird, Benjamin L.j'f Maryland. 

Brown, George H.»< Maryland. 

Bussey, Harry G., Jri. Penn'a, 

Cairnes, George H./. Maryland. 

Campbell, Bernard J .^r. I Maryland. 

Carroll, Charles Xk^. Maryland. 

Carter, James M.v Maryland. 

Claridge, Joseph S.,' Maine. 

Corse, George F., Maryland. 

Cruikshank, James A.k , c Louisiana. 

Davison, Garland H.i Maryland. 

Dodge, Augustus Wj. , NewYork. 

Donsife, Henry L..^ ,... Maryland. 

Downes, Wra. H.,#"r, Maryland. 

Dunlap, Albert.... Maryland. 

Esgate, John . . . v Maryland. 

Ewell, Augustus D. F.-* Virginia. 

Fawcett, Christopher. ; Maryland. 

Fulks, James S..... Maryland. 

Gerry, NathanielB., Maryland. 

Gordon, Basil F....J Maryland. 

Harper, Isaac S ..' Maryland. 

Jarrett, Martin L Maryland. 

Keedy, Samuel H.t Maryland. 

Kelly, John I Maryland. 



20 GRADUATES. 

NAMES. RESIDENCE. 

Le Cato, George W...^ Virginia. 

Mahon, James T L... Penn'a. 

Maughliu, Hugh A.. .A' Maryland. 

Mchring, A, liuffingtoiV: Marvland. 

Monmonier, Loiiis A../. Maryland. 

Mudd, Joseph A k Missouri. 

Nelson, G. VV. H i Maryland. 

Price, James TT .U: Maryland. 

Reid, Vj. Miller U. Maryland. 

Richardson, Henry i Maryland. 

Roberts, Charles E....^ Maryland. 

Robertson, Wm. W.../ Maryland. 

R utter , Alexander W. M ary land . 

Shaw, Frank T i«r. Maryland. 

Shoemaker, Edwin B. S\/. Maryland. 

Shueey, Joseph R.'T..../. Maryland. 

Simmons, Albert T J. Cuba. 

Smith, Nathaniel S ) Virginia. 

Smith, T. EjHDory I. Maryland. 

Stone, D. Edwin.. t. Maryland. 

Stone, Vf. H t. Maryland.' 

Thru=;ton, H. Scott ...^ ■ Maryland. 

Titeomb, Beriah I. Maryland . 

Walshe, Despard M...£ Ireland. 

Watts, Henry Robert.. i-f. Maryland. 

Weaver, John F. B...I . Maryland. 

Weedon, John H. W. Gl #. Maryland. 

Wetms, Julius B ( Maryland. 

ZluHnerman, Luther M.i,< , Murylaiid. 

A' 



I 



■f ■ 

I 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 17th of Octo- 
ber, 1864, and close on the 1st of March, 1865. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, fifteen dollars each ; Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Infirmary as clinical assistants. The fee is one hun- 
dred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

STAT IT T E S . 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, wdiich is five dollars. The matricula- 
tion and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commence- 
ment of tlie session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this, after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of 
his own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his ov/n observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught in 
this School. He must also produce evidence of attendance, 
during one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical 
Medicine. 



22 FEES, STATUTES, ETC. 

C). The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the. Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

Y. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desire it ; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the re- 
sult of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for 
examination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise 
the right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifica- 
tions an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded 
as obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sicndays excepted. No persons, except Physicians 
and Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltenberger, Dean. 

J^^Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor , who may be found at his house on the University 
grounds^ ic ill conduct gentleincn to comfortable and convenieiit boarding houses. The 
expenses of lioing are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the coimtry — good board 
being obtained at from $3 to %^ per week. 



-^-^-^-^-^-^■--'"■'"^' 



^^i .^^^^^^^^^^^^^^J.^^^^^^^^^^^^^ . . - . . ,^^,^. . . 



TIEiE 



BALTIMORE INFIRMARY 




Is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of t^.e University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently 
been erected, containing commodious private apartments sepa- 
rate from the more public portion of the house. Persons from 
a distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find 
the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from three to ten dollars per week, according to the ac- 
commodations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. Edward F. 
MiLHOLLAXD, Kcsideut Physician. 



i* * t' t^V tti lV Wi r 9*W V» m\99999W9WWWW » i * W V W' 



***' ' ■ ■ ■ ■ ii^jLiiLi.ii: 



Uuir&Tsitj ai Maryland. 



FIFTY-EIGHTH 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF T 11 K 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 




SESSIOJNT 1865-66 



Xi a 1 1 1 m o r* e 



PRINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



M D C C C L X V . 



>***** P^V^^v^p^V^ 



naiTersitj of If arjlaad« ■ 

FIFTY-EIGHT 
ANNUAL CIRCULAR 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 

Session 186o-e6, 



AND 



dfcirj 



SESSION 1864-65, 



Hk ttfi© ^pa)dlEfi8it©s ©f I86i» 



B^IL»TIM:OPtE: 

PKINTED BY SHERWOOD & CO 



MDCCCLXV. 



TEXT BOOKS 



Anatomy and Physiology. — The Skeleton and the Teetli, 
Prof. Owen; Gray's Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy, Dal- 
ton's Physiology, Draper's Physiology, Carpenter's Human 
Physiology, Kirke's Physiology. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children. — Caz- 
eaux's, Churchill's, Kigby's Midwifery ; West's, Evanson's, 
Condie's Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lectures, 
Williams' Principles of Medicine, Latham on the Heart, 
Bennett's Practice of Medicine, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — Wood's and Bache's 
Dispensatory, Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Med- 
ica, Beck's Materia Medica, Stille's Materia Medica and Ther- 
apeutics. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. . 



NATHAN Pv. SMITH, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 



WM. E. A. AIKIN, M. D., LL. D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY. 



a. W. MILTENBERGEE, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND THE DISEASES OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN. 



RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, OF HYGIENE AND 
OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. 



CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 



SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D. 

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 



JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D. 

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY. 



a. W. MILTENBERGER, M. D, 

DEAN. 



OFFICERS OF THE INFIRMARY. 



SISTER URSULA Sister Superior. 

N. G. KEIRLE, M. D ^ ResiderU Physician. 

Jno. H. W. G. WEEDOX, M. D Clinical Clerk. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 



JOSIAH S. BOWEN, WILLIAM C. POE, 

WILLIAM LEE, REVERDY B. STEWART, 

JAMES E. MITCHELL, CALEB B. WHITE, 

HARRY C. MORRISON. 



^nniaal Circular, 



The fifty-eiglit session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 16th 
of October, 1865, and will end on the 1st of March, 1866. 

The Faculty have the pleasure to announce to their breth- 
ren and to the public generally, that the School of Medicine 
in the University of Maryland is fully prepared for giving 
the most ample course of medical instruction, and such pre- 
parations have been made that every branch will be taught 
with the fullest advantages. No pains will be spared to 
make the students in this College proficients in their pro- 
fession. Lectures form a prominent part of the course of 
instruction, but not the only part. The students are urged 
to attend the examinations held regularly by the professors 
upon the various branches, and these examinations are found 
to be of the greatest utility. They impress facts firmly upon 
the minds of the students, and cause them also to give in- 
creased attention both to the lectures and to their private 
studies. They enforce concentration of thought, and make 
diligence imperative. The Faculty have observed the 
greatest improvement in the classes effected by close and 
systematic examinations in the respective departments. 

The course of instruction is illustrated by the use of 
models, paintings, diagrams, wet and dry preparations, &c., 
many of which have been imported from Europe, while 
others have been prepared, and are still prepared, or procured 
as occasion may require, under the supervision of the various 
professors. Each course has its own proper means of illus- 
tration. In the College Museum there is a general collection 



6 ANNUAL CIRCULAR. 

of Anatomical and Pathological specimens, whicli are used 
in public teaching, and which the students can examine pri- 
vately at their leisure. 

In short, all the arrangements are carefully made for the 
full illustration of Anatomy and Physiology, of Surgery, of 
the Practice of Medicine, of Obstetrics, of Materia Medica, 
and of Chemistry. 

Yet the course is not made up of didactic lectures, exam- 
inations, illustrations, &c., in the class-rooms. Something 
more is necessary for a complete course of instruction. This 
something is supplied by the large hospital — the Baltimore 
Infirmary — attached to the school. The students have access 
to the wards of this hospital throughout the entire year. 
During the course of lectures, they go daily from the lecture- 
rooms to the wards of the Infirmary, where they can observe 
the reduction of theory to practice. All the important ope- 
rations in Surgery are there performed in their presence ; 
and in practical medicine they see the treatment in the civil 
wards of all the indigenous diseases of the country, and in 
the seamen's wards of a vast proportion of the diseases which 
originate in -the tropics, or in other distant regions. This 
bringing of students into the presence of disease and to the 
application of treatment, carries instruction home to them 
much more forcibly than would be possible from the most 
elaborate course of mere abstract and theoretic teaching. 

Military Surgery and military Hygiene will continue to 
form a constituent part of the course of instruction. 

The facilities afforded by the school for the study of Prac- 
tical Anatomy are all that the most diligent and zealous stu- 
dent can desire. Anatomical subjects are supplied in abun- 
dance and at moderate expense. The rooms are open from 
the beginning of October, and as they are lighted with gas, 
dissection can be pursued during the appointed hours every 
evening. 

The science of Physiology, a knowledge of which is so es- 
sential to the physician, — who cannot intelligently treat de- 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR. i 

rangements of the functional operations of the organs of the 
body unless he is acquainted with the healthy actions of 
these organs, — is taught not only orally, but by means of 
actual ex^oeriments before the class. In this manner the 
various functions of the organism and the secretions and ex- 
cretions of the body are prominently and effectively shown. 

The Faculty pledge themselves to give to their students 
all facilities and advantages in a degree not surpassed, as 
they believe, by any school in America, but they must re- 
mind the students that professors can perform but a limited 
portion of the work necessary to preparing young men for 
the arduous duties of the profession of medicine. The Fac- 
ulty cannot cease to feel a lively interest in the honor and 
good repute of the profession, and especially of such mem- 
bers of it as go from this school. They therefore urge upon 
their pupils diligence in study, and that rectitude of moral 
deportment which should ever distinguish the physician and 
the gentleman. They earnestly solicit the co-operatioh of 
the students with their own endeavors to make them worthy 
and accomplished members of a most honorable profession. 
They exert such influence as they can to inspire their students 
with a laudable ambition to do justice to themselves, to their 
friends, to their preceptors, and ultimately to society at 
large. More than this, the Faculty cannot do. But they 
point with pride to the numerous alumni, who reflect honor 
upon this school from all parts of the Continent. And judg- 
ing from the past, they confidently believe that the young 
men hereafter entrusted to them, with the increased advan- 
tages which the school now enjoys, will be equally prepared 
to do credit to the profession and to their Alma Mater. 
By order of the Faculty, 

G. W. MILTENBEKGER, M. D., Dean, 

Baltimoee, July 31, 1865. 



CASES OF THE VARIOUS DISEASES, &C., HEREIN MENTIONED 

Were treated in tlie Medical Departmeut of the Baltimore Infirmary. 

From February 1st, 1864, to February 1st, 1865. 



Abortion, 

Albuminuria, 

Amenorrhoea, 

Abscess of Lungs, 

Ansemia, 

Angina Pectoris, 

Asthma, 

Anteversion of Womb, 

Apoplex3^ 

Bright's Disease, 

Bronchitis, Acute 

" Chronic 

Cephalalgia, 
Constipatio, 
Dehrium Tremens, 
Dementia, 
Debauch, 
Debility, General, 
Diarrhoea, Acute 

" Chronic 

Diphtheritis, 
Dysmenorrheea, 
Dysentery, Acute 

" Chronic 

Dyspepsia, 
Dropsy, 

" Anasarca 
" Ascites 
" Renal 
Enteritis, Chronic 
Endocarditis, 
Epilepsy, 

Emphysema of Lungs, 
Epistaxis, 
Fever, 

" Intermittent 

" Remittent 

" Typhoid 

" Spotted 
Gastritis, 
Heematemesis, 
Hsematuria, 
Hepatitis, 



Hemicrania, 

Heart, functional diseases of 

" organic diseases of 
Herpes, 

Hypochondriasis, 
Hysteria, 
Icterus, 

Inflammation of Womb, 
Laryngitis, 
Leucocytha3mia, 
Lumbago, 
Leucorrhoea, 
Nephritis, 
Neuralgia, 
Neurasthenia, 
Pericarditis, 
Pleurodynia, 
Perityphlitis, 
Parotitis, 
Paralysis, Agitans 

" Crucialis 

" Facialis 

" General 

*' Hemiplegia 

" Paraplegia 
Phthisis, 
Podagra, 
Pleuritis, 
Pneunomia, 
Pneunomia, Pleuro, 
Pneunomia, Typhoid, 
Rheumatism, Acute 
" . Chronic 
Siriasis, 
Splenitis, 
Sciatica, 
Scarlatina, 
Scorbutus, 
Small-Pox, 
Struma, 
Tetanus, 
Tonsillitis. 



THE FOLLOWING DISEASES AND INJURIES 

Were treated in tlie Siu-gical Department of tlie Baltimore Infixmary. 

From February 1st, 1864. to February 1st, 1865. 



Abscess, 

Amaurosis, 

Anthrax, 

Arthrocace, 

Balanitis, 

Burn, 

Calculus, Renal, 

Carcinoma of the Rectum, 

Carcinoma of the Uterus, 

Caries of the Vertebrae, 

Cataract, 

Chemosis, 

Conjunctivitis, Acute 

" Chronic 

Concussion of the Brain 
Coxalgia, 
Condylomata, 
Cystitis, 

Dislocations of various Joints, 
Ecthyma, 
Eczema, 
Epiphora, 
Encysted Sarcoma, 
Erythema, 
Erysipelas, 
Fistula in Ano, 
Fistula in Perineo, 
Fracture of Femur, 

" of Femur, compound, 

" of Metacarpal bones, 

" of lower Maxillary, 

" of Olecranon, 

" of Phalanges, 
of Ribs, 

" of Radius and Ulna, 
of Tibia and Fibula, 

** of Tibia and Fibula, 
com p. com. 

" of Skull, 

" of Vertebrae, 
Gangrene, 
Gonorrhoea, 
Uare-Lip, 



Haemorrhoids, 

Herpes Preputialis, 

Hydrocele, 

Hypopion, 

Hernia, Strang, 

Injury, 

Impetigo, 

Iritis, 

Incontinence of Urine, 

Luxation of ancle joint. 

Luxation of Humerus, 

Onychia Maligna, 

Orchitis, 

Ophthalmia, Gonorrhoeal, 

" Strumous, 

Otitis, 
Ozaena, 
Paronychia, 
Pernio, 
Periostitis, 
Phlebitis, 
Phymosis, 
Pompholyx, 
Polypus of Nose, 
Prolapsus Ani, 
Prolapsus Uteri, 
Prurigo Podicis, 
Psoriasis, 
Pterygium, 
Retention of Urine, 
Sarcocele, 
Scabies, 
Scirrhus, 
Sclerotitis, 
Spermatorrhoea, 
Stricture, 
Synovitis, 
Syphilis, 
Urticaria, 
Ulcers 
Tumors, 

Wounds, gunshot. 
" various. 



SUKGICAL OPERATIONS WERE PERFORMED 



AS FOLLO^VS 
From February 1st, 1864:, to February 1st, 1865. 



Amputations of Fingers, 
of Foot, 
of Leg, 
of Thigh, 
" of Arm, 
of Thumb, 
of Toe, 
" of Penis, 
Cataract, operation for 
Extirpation of Mammse, 
of Testicle, 
" of Tumors, 
" of Scirrhus of Breast, 
Fistula in Ano, operation for 
Fistula, vfcsico Vaginal " " 
Harelip, " " 

Hydrocele, " " 

Lithotomy, 



Lithotripsy, 

Necrosis of Sternum, operation for 
Necrosis of Tibia, operation for 
Neuroma, " " 

Ovariotomy, 
Paracentesis Abdominis, 
Paraphymosis, operation for 
Phymosis, " *• 

Prolapsus Ani, '* " 
Polypus Uteri, " '' 
Polypus of Nose, " " 
Pieduction of Luxation of Ankle Joint, 
Reduction of Luxation of Humerus, 
Eeduction of Luxation of Femur, 
Strangulated Hernia, 
Trepanning Skull, 
Varicocele, operation for 



€alalop( ol i!IlaldcaUff5 



Session of 1864-65 



NAMES. 

Adams, F. A, 
Anderson, Charles D. 
Arnold, W. T. 
Arthur, H. W. 
Atkinson, J. E. 
Backus, John S. 
Balch, S. F. 
Baldwin, Silas 
Barney, John W, 
Barber, Thomas K. 

Beckenbaiighj John M, 

Bennett, W. H. 
Betson, George W. 
Bogue, Eobcrt James 
Bohanan, Wm. T, 

Booth, William 

Boiildin, Robert R. 

Bowen, Josiah S. 

Brown, Henry C. 
Brown, Thomas R. 
Burch, D. C. 
Burleigh, Wm. E. 
Burton, James W. 
Cathell, Daniel W. 
Caulk, William 
Caulk, W. H. 



PRECEPTORS. 

Dr. James Dickson, 
Prof. N, R. Smith, 

Dr. R. Arthur, 
Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. A. C. Robinson, 

Dr. Dunbar, 

Prof. McSherry and Dr, Van Bibber 

Drs. Liggett and Beckenbaugh, and 

Prof McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, 

Dr. J. a Healy, 

Dr. J, A. Holton, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. J. T. Bohanan, 

Dr. 0. J. Smith, Prof. McSherry \ 

and Dr. Van Bibber, J 

Dr. W. A. ZoUicoffer, 

Baltimore Infirmary and 1 

Prof. N. R. Smith, j 

Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Prof. McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, 

Dr. John Hooker, 

Dr. Samuel Kepler, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 

Dr. J. C. Gibson, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 
Maryland, 
Maryland. 
Marjdand. 
Maryland. 
Maryland, 
Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
, Maryland. 

[Maryland 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

California. 

, Maryland. 

Maryland, 
, Maryland. 

IMass. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



12 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMES. 

Chaney, Thomas M. 
Chapman, Pearson, Jr. 
Chapman, Robert F. 
Christie, Arthur 
Cockey, C. 
Comegjys, Nathaniel 
Coonan, Daniel S. 
Coskery, Oscar J. 
Corrabe, J. T. 
Cruikshank, Harrison 
Curry, Wm. H. 
Daly, Omrles H. 

Dashiell, George M. 

Dashiell, Wm. H. H. 
Dohme, Gustavus C. 
Donavin, M. W. 
Ducket t, Richard J. 
Dudderow, Jno W. 
Eiseuhart, W. H. 
Evans, Wm. Warrington 
Finley, S. C 
Fleming, Wm. P. 
Franklin, Benj. G. 
Free, Adam C. 
Fririger, W. K. 
Frush, C. Y. R. 
Gibson, Alexander E. 
Gore, A. J. 
Groff, J. H. 
Gross, John I. 
Grove, W. R. 
Groves, Benjamin B. 
Haefner, Gustavus A. 
Hall, A. E. 
Hammond, J. Ridgely 
Hawkins, E. C 
Hawkins, J. Weems 
Henry, Robert J. 
Hofifmeier, Francis C. 
Holsonbaker, A., M. D. 



PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Dr. J. S. Smith, Maryland. 

Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, Maryland. 
Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, Mar^dand. 
Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, England. 



Dr. William Denny, 
Dr. E. F. Noland, 

Dr. F. S. Coskery, 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. R. G. Rankin, 

Dr Cadmus Dashiell and ) 
Prof. N. R. Smith, J 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. F. E. B. Hintze, 

Drs. Duckett and Simmons^ 

Dr. C. W. Benson, 

Dr. Jacob Eisenliart, 

Dr. Gorgas, 

Dr. E. H. Richardson, 

Dr. J. P. Fleming, 

Dr. Francis J. Crawford, 

Dr. J. W. Herring, 
Dr. Monkur, 



Dr. M. X. Taylor, 

Dr. 0. S. Mahon, 

Dr. J. L. Veazey, 

Dr. F. E. B. Hintze, 

Drs. Gibson and Yi ogling, 

Dr. Wm. Hammond, 

Dr. J. A. Hawkins, 

Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, Maryland. 

Dr. S. H. Henry, Maryland^ 

Dr. J. F. E. Weaver, Maryland. 

Augusta Medical College, Georgia. 



Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Dist. Col. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Puerto Rico. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland- 

Penn'a. 

Maryland , 

Maryland. 

Penn'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Penn'a. 

Maryland. 

Penn'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

N. Jersey. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Ohio. 

Maryland, 

Maryland . 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



13 



NAMES. 

Hooper, John R. 
Huet, A,, Jr. 
Mysore, W. T. 
Innes, James 
Irons, Edward P. 
Jones, G. H. W. 
Jones, George Perry 
Jones, Henry Z. 
Jones, J. P., M. D. 
Kealbofer, Richard H. 

Keene, Samuel J. A. 

Kellam, F. C. A. 
Kelly, Lewis 
Kelly, Thomas 
Ker, Samuel H. 
Kidder, Jerome H. 
King, John T, 
Kirby, Thomas Edward 
Knotts, James V. 
Kugler, Joseph 

Landers, Thomas 
Lansdale, Benj. F, 
Lautenbach, Robert 
Lauver, Milton, A. 
Lawson, Lemuel S. 
Leamy, J. C. 
Lee, William 

Le Fevre, Hiram W. 

Magruder, Thomas L. 
Mansfield, Richard W. 
Marshall, J. T. 
Marshall, Robert M. 
Martin, Mathias 
McClure, Wm. J. 
McElderry, Henry, Jr. 
McLaughlin, Francis X. 
McPherson, Maynard 



PRECEPTORS. 

Dr. S. H. Henry, 
Dr. A. Huet, 
Dr. R, E. Jones, 
Dr. J. D. McClure, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Penn'a. 



Dr. Wm. McDaniel, 



Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Arkansas, 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 



Prof. N. R. Smith, 

University of Nashville, 

Dr. N. B. Scott, 

Dr. Henry Gross and Prof. ) 

McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, j 

Prof. X. R. Smith, 

Dr. F. J. Crawford, 

Dr. M. N. Taylor, 

Drs. J. S. Ker and T. Emory Smith. Maryland, 

Prof. MeSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, Maryland. 

Drs. Donaldson and Chatard, Jr.^ Maryland. 

Dr. F. Jenkins, Maryland. 

Dr. J. T. Tucker, Maryland. 

Dr. James H. Ourry, Germany. 

Dr. Wm. White, Prof. McSherry 1 

and Dr. Van Bibber, J 

Dr. J. N. Wood, 



Dr. Martin, Prof. McSherry 
Dr. Van Bibber, 
Dr. Henry Beltz, 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Balto. Infirmary, Dr. G.W. West, 1,. „. 
Prof. McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, j "^^^^^'^ "'^' 
Dr. T. 0. Kinzer, Prof. McSherry ) 
and Dr. Van Bibber, j 

Prof. N. R. Smith, 
Dr. Charles Jones, 
Dr. M. F Frush, 
Dr. John W. Hilleary, 
Dr. T. Simpson, 



Penn'a. 



Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Surgeon D. C. Peters, U S. A. Maryland. 

Prof. McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, Virginia. 
Prof. McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, Maryland. 



14 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



NAMES. 

Miller, T. E. R. 
Mitchell, James E. 
Monmonier, J. Carroll 
Moore, Jaines M. 
]\Ioran, George H. R. 

ivlorrison, Harry C. 

MuQcaster, Otbo M. 
Xewman, C. M., Jr. 

Xoonan, Francis B. 

Xorris, John B. 
Parramore, Edward L. 
Parsons, Anson 
Petherbridge, G. \V. 

Pindeli, Joseph T,, A. M. 

Poe, William C. 

Price, A. 
Price, Piobert J. 
Purcell, James 
Eaborg, Joseph S. 

Reed, Wiliam P. 
Kennolds, Henry T. 
Robertson, E. W. 
Robinson, George L. 

Robinson, Joseph 
Rosse, Irying C. 
Rourk, Francis 
Rusk, G. Glanville 
Schley, Fredk. A. 
Scott, J. Ward 
Sears, James E. 
Seth, James 
Shearer, Xiles H. 
Shipley, Henry G. 
Skinner, John 0. 



PRECEPTORS. 

Dr. Wm. Zimmerman, 

Baltimore Infirmary and Drs. > 

Donaldson and Chatard, Jr., j 

Dr. Louis A. Monmonier, 

Dr. Joshua M. Deaver, 

Dr. A. J. Ritchie, Prof. McSberry ) 

and Dr. Van Bibber, j 

Baltimore Infirmary and Prof. \ 

McSiierry and Dr. Van Bibber, J 

Dr. Edwin M. Muncaster, 

Dr. C. M. Newman, 

Dr. Charles Smith and Prof. ) 

IMcSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, j 



Dr. Francis West, 
U. S. A. Gen'l Hospital, Camden St. 
Drs. Donaldson and Chatard, Jr., 
Dr. John Ridout and Prof. 1 

McSberry and Dr. Van Bibber, J 
Baltimore Infirmary and Prof. 1 
McSberry and Dr. Van Bibber, J 

Dr. J. A. Holton, 

Drs. Donaldson and Chatard, Jr., 

Dr. C. H. Raborg, 

Dr. F. Floyd and Prof. McSheriy \ 

and Dr. Van Bibber, J 

Dr. F. E. B. Hintze, 

Dr. Samuel H. Robertson, 

Dr. A. C. Robinson and Prof. ) 
X. R. Smith, J 

Dr. A. H. Bayly, 

Prof. X. R. Smith, 

Dr. Monkur, 

Dr. N. B. Scott, 

Dr C. A. Pope, 

Dr. Thomas F. Owens, 

Prof. McSberry and Dr. Van Bibber, 

Dr. G. L. Shearer, 

Dr. N. Brown, 

Dr. B. F. Smith, 



RESIDENCE. 

Maryland. 
Marj'land. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Virginia. 
Penn'a. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Marj^and. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Missouri. 
Maryland. 

Virginia. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Canada, 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Missouri. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
P.enn'a. 
Maryland. 
Maryland . 



CATALOGUE OF MATRICULATES. 



1 



NAMES. 

Spangler, William H. 
Stanton, Patrick 
Stevens, V. B. 

Stewart, Eeverdy B. 

Storr, L. P. 

Tall, Reuben J. H. 

Taneyhill, George L. 

Taylor, John A. 
Theobald, Samuel 
Thompson, James F.,D. D. 
Tilghman, Charles H. 
Trader, R. H. 
Trapnell, R. W. 
Tickers, Albert 
Wagner, Harrison 

Waller, Edward R. 

Water, T. S. 

Weirick, Samuel T. 

Wells, Richard G. 

White, Galeb C. 

Williams, Denard S. 
Willson, Thomas B. 
Wilson, Wm. W. 
Woodville, Harry 

Worthington, George C. 

Yourtee, J. Tilghman 



PRECEPTOKS. 

Dr. Charles Smith, 

Baltimore Infirmary ^and Prof. } 
McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, J 
Dr. Wm. H. Storr, 
Dr. Benjamin L. Smith, 
Dr. J. F.Petherbridge and Prof. ) 
McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, j 
Dr. John R. Bardwell, 
Prof. X.R.Smith, 
S. Prof. McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, 
Prof. McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, 

Dr. George W. West, 

Drs. Donaldson and Chatard, Jr., 

Dr. William H. Wagner, 

Dr. J. W. Dashiell and Prof. 1 

N. R. Smith, / 

Drs. Gideon and Tingling and Prof. 
McSherry and Dr. Van Bibber, 
Dr. Thomas W. Wells, 

Balto. Infirmary and Prof. N. R. \ 
Smith, J 

Dr. E. W. Free, 

Dr. T. L. Holton, 

Dr. F. J. S. Gorgas, 

Drs. John and Riggin Buckler, 

Dr. Wm. H. Worthington and \ 

Prof. N. R. Smith, / 

Prof. McSherry and Dr.Van Bibber, 



RESIDENCE. 

Virginia, 

Maryland^ 

Indiana. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 
Maryland . 

Ohio. 

Penn'a. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 

I Ohio. 

Maryland- 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 
Maryland. 

Maryland. 

Maryland. 



GRA.r)UA.TES, 



At the Annual Commencement held March, 1865, the following Candi' 
dates received the Degree of Doctor in Medicine. 

NAMES. RESIDENCE. 

Atkinson, I. Edmonson.; Maryland. 

Balch, Stephen F.« Virginia. 

Barber, Thomas K* Maryland. 

Betson, Geo. W.*. Maryland. 

Booth , W illiam . * Maryland . 

Bouldiu, Robt. R^ Maryland. 

Bowen, Josiah S.i California. 

Brown, Henry C/. Maryland. 

Burch, Dennis C* Maryland. 

Burleigh, W. Elizur Mass. 

Chapman, Pearson, Jr.* Maryland. 

Chapman, Robert F.. Maryland. 

Coskery, Oscar J.. Maryland. 

Cruikshank, Harrison Maryland. 

Dashiell, W. H. H... Maryland. 

Dohme, Gustavus C.« Maryland. 

Free, Adam C* Penn'a. 

Gibson, Alexander E .• Maryland. 

Gross, John L, Jr.. Maryland. 

Grove, W. R .». Maryland. 

Groves, Benj. Ba Delaware. 

Hawkins, J. Weems.i Maryland. 

Holstenbake, A Georgia. 

Irons, Edward P Maryland. 

Jones, Geo. Perry./ Maryland. 

Jones, Henry Z.* Maryland. 

Keene, Samuel J. A.# Maryland. 

Kelly, Lewis.'. Maryland. 

2 



18 GRADUATES. 

NAMES. RESIDENCE, 

Ker, Samuel H.;- Maryland. 

Kugler, Joseph.:. Germany. 

Landers, Thorn as ; Maryland . 

Lautenbach, Rob't.. Maryland. 

Lauver, Milton A. Maryland. 

Lee, William Maryland. 

Mansfield, K. W... Maryland. 

Martin, Mathias Maryland. 

McElderry, Henry..- : Maryland. 

McPherson, Maynardi... Maryland. 

Mitchell, James E....; Maryland. 

Moran, Geo. H. R... Maryland. 

Parramore, Edward L* Virginia, 

Parsons, Anson Penu'a. 

Pindell, Jos. T .- Maryland. 

Poe, William C >. Maryland. 

Reed, William P «. Virginia, 

Robinson, Geo. L Maryland. 

Rourk, Francis ' CanadaW. 

Seth, James ( Maryland. 

Shipley, Henry C....' Mciryland. 

Stewart, Revcrdy B/ Virginia. 

Taneyhill, G. Lanc.i^ Ohio. 

Tall, Reuben J. H..5 Maryland. 

Thompson, James F\ Maryland, 

Wagner , Harrison . . . .\ Maryland . 

Weirick, Samuel T..; Ohio. 

White, Caleb B Maryland. 

Williams, Denard S Maryland. 

Your tee, J. Tilghman Maryland. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c. 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 16th of Octo- 
ber, 1865, and close on the 1st of March, 1866. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, //if ee/^io^^ars each ; Practical 
Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Infirmary as clinical assistants. The fee is one hun- 
dred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending lectures must matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matricula- 
tion and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commence- 
ment of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this, after one 
in some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a thesis of 
his own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science, or a clinical report of not less than six cases of dis- 
ease, drawn up from his own observation. No thesis will be 
received after the time specified above, but by a special vote 
of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught in 
this school. He must also produce evidence of attendance, 
during one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical 
Medicine. 



20 FEES, STATUTES, ETC. 

6. The graduation fee, whicli is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a major- 
ity of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desire it : or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on 
the Lectures during the session, attendance upon w^hich is 
earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as upon the re- 
sult of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student Avho has complied with the technical 
requisitions, viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a thesis, may appear before them for 
examination, they reserve to themselves, and will exercise 
the right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifica- 
tions an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures^ will always be regarded 
as obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock, 
P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Physicians 
and medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms without 
special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

George W. Miltenbekger, Dean. 



Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, who may he found at his house on the University 
grounds, will conduct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient boarding houses. The 
expenses of living are as low i?i Baltimore as in any city in the country. 



AiAifcAAiAA^^^^ * < t** JlAA^h^^b*** i * * 




BALTIMORE INFIRMARY, 

Which is Attached to the Medical College, 

Is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently 
been erected, containing commodious private apartments, sepa- 
rate from the more public portion of the house. Persons from 
a distance requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find 
the Institution admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from five to fen dollars per week, according to the ac- 
commodations required. 

Applications for admission maybe made to Dr. J. J. Beckex- 
BAUGH, Resident Physician. 




i'„ 



r 



WatT©ffiltf @t Ma^f liLa€* 



FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



m.i 



Ojt mmmmmm 



?) 




^Essioiv i^ea-er. 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY KELLY .^' PIET 

PRIXTEBS, BOOKSELLERS AXD STATIOXERS, 
174 BALTIMORE STREET. 



MDCCCLXVI. 



iiif lEsrri m iammib. 



» ^ » »' « 



FIFTY-NINTH 



j^iiiti?jiiL €iEm€irii4m 



OFT IT K 







SEISSIOIsr 1866-67; 



GatalogHe of Matricniates and Graduates, 



3Eissio3sr xs65-ee 



BALTIMOllE: 
PRINTED BY KELLY ^1^ PIBT, 

174 BALTIMORE STREJ^T. 



M D C C C L X Y I . 



tXi S00llS* 



Anatomy. — The Skeleton and the Teeth, Prof. Owen ; 
Gray's Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children. — Caz- 
eaux's, Churchill's, Kigby's Midwifery ; West's, Evan- 
son's, Condie's Diseases of Children. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lec- 
tures, Williams' Principles of Medicine, Flint's Practice, 
Bennett's Practice, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — U. S. Dispensatory, 
Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Medica, Beck's 
Materia Medica, Stille's Materia Medica. 

Physiology, Hygiene and General Pathology. — Todd & 
Bowman's Physiological Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, 
Simon's General Pathology, Jones' & Seiveking's Patho- 
logical Anatomy, Parkes' Hygiene. 



W 



JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



:F-A.OTJi-.Tir o:f :ph:"Y"sxo. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 

Professor of Surgery. 
W. E. A. AIKIN, M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Ohemistry and Pharmacy. 
GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Professor of Obsieirics and of Diseases of Women and Children. 

RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D., 

Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D., 

Professor of General, Descriptive, and Surgical Anatomij. 

SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D., 

Professoi' of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

FRANK DONALDSON, M. D., 

Professor of Physiology, Hygiene, and General Pathology. 

JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy and Adjunct to the Professor of Anatomy. 

ALAN P. SMITH, M. D., 

Adjunct to the Professor of Surgery. 

FERD. E. CHATARD, Jr., M. D., 

Adjunct to the Professor of Obstetrics. 

W. CHEW VAN BIBBER, M. D., 
Adjunct to the Professor of Practice. 

J. H. STRAITH, M. D., ••^' 

Adjunct to the Professor of Materia Medica. 
M. J. De ROSSET, M. D., 
Adjunct to the Professor of Chemistry. 

WM. T. HOWARD, M. D., 

Adjunct to tJte Professor of Physiology. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Dean of the Faculty. 






(mFIRMARY) FOR 1865, 



Rebidekt PiiYgiciAxN J.J. BECKENBAUGH, M. D. 

Clinical Clki^ JAS. E. MITCHELL, M. D. 

816TER SuPERioK SISTER URSULA. 



^HniNiE ^sststiinti 



THOMAS R. BROWN, 
JOHN M. BECKENBAUGH, 
ARTHUR CHRISTIE, 
JOHN W. DUDDEROW, 
JOHN T. KING, 
THOMAS L. MAGRUDER, 



OTHO M. MUNCASTER, 
FRANCIS H. NOONAN, 
IRVING C. ROSSE, 
FRED'K A. SCHLEY, 
JOHN 0. SKINNER, 
ALBERT VICKERS. 



ftnibfrsitg of Marglantr 

SESSION" 1866-67. 



The Fifty-ninth Session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 
15th of October, 1866, and will end on the 1st of March, 
1867. 

This School commands all the means and advantages in 
use at the present day for giving a complete course of Med- 
ical instruction. Besides the usual Didactic Lectures in 
the various College halls, there are Clinical Lectures in the 
wards of the Hospital attached to the College, which ren- 
der the course of instruction eminently practical. There 
are also public examinations held by the Professors, in 
which all the more advanced students are invited to par- 
ticipate. None are required to undergo these public exam- 
inations, but it is observed that few decline, and all are 
obviously benefitted by them. 

In consequence of the facilities possessed by this School 
for Clinical Teaching^ special attention is bestowed uj^on 
this most important method of instruction. The Univer- 
sity Hospital, commonly known as the Baltimore Infirmary, 
which is also the Seamen's Hospital for the Port of Balti- 
more, is in the immediate vicinity of the College. It is 
under the exclusive control of the Faculty, and students 
have at all times free access to its public wards. All the 



operations in surgerj are here performed in their i)re«ence ; 
and in practical Medicine the indigenous diseases of tlie 
country, and among the seamen, diseases originating in 
the Tropics and in other distant regions, are always under 
observation and treatment. The Hospital is open not only 
during the Lecture Term, hut throughout the year, and 
Clinical instruction, both in Medicine and Surgery, is given 
regularly by the various Professors at all seasons. Further 
advantages for the Clinical study of diseases are offered by 
the Baltimore Special Dispensary , which is partly under 
the charge of Adjuncts to the members of the Faculty. 
Every facility will be extended to students by the Physi- 
cians and Surgeons in charge of the Special Dispensary, 
for acquiring proficiency in such diseases or forms of disease 
as may be most useful or attractive for special investiga- 
tion, as Diseases of the Eye, Diseases of the Skin, Diseases 
of Females and Children, &c. The Bay-Vieio Hospital, a 
magnificent establishment attached to the new Baltimore 
City Almshouse, and the St. Agnes Hospital, also afford 
extensive fields for Clinical study. There are comfortable 
arrangements at the Bay- View Hospital for resident stu- 
dents. The Home of the Friendless and the St. Vincent 
Foundling Asylum are large Hospitals, to which the stu- 
dents have access, and where regular Clinical instruction 
is imparted to them. 

Since the close of the last session some important changes 
have been made in the organization of the School, which, 
it is believed, will materially promote its usefulness, by 
expanding the means of imparting thorough medical in- 
struction. A new Professorship of Physiology, Hygiene 
and General Pathology, has been created, which will allow 
a greater degree of attention to be bestowed on these im- 
portant branches than heretofore. Adjuncts have also 
been appointed to the several Professors, who will render 
assistance in the different departments. The facilities 
afforded for the study of Practical Anatomy are unsur- 
passed. 



inmia©! i©®il@a 



In addition to the Lectures of the Winter, arrangements 
have been made for a Summer Course of Instruction, under 
the charge of the Adjuncts to the different Professors, and 
other gentlemen. This Course will commence about the 
15th of March next, and continue until the 1st of July. 

Attendance upon the Summer Course is entirely volun- 
tary, but it is believed that students will find it greatly to 
their advantage to avail themselves of the opportunities 
thus afforded of acquiring additional information upon 
certain special subjects. The order of Lectures will be so 
arranged that the students will be able to attend upon the 
daily Clinical instruction given at the Univergity Hospital 
by the members of the Faculty. 

The programme of Lectures in this Course will be as 
follows : 

Jas. H. Butlek, M. D. — Operative Surgcr3\ 

Alan P. Smith, M. D.— Orthopaedic Surgeiy, and Dislocations and Frac- 
tures. 
F. E. CuATARD, Jr., M. D.— Diseases of Women and Children. 
W. C. Van Bibber, M. D.— Venereal Pathology. 
J. II. Straitii, M. D. — Surgical Pathology. 

M. J. De Rosset, M. D. — Physiological and Pathological Chemistry. 
Wm. T. Howard, M. D. — xiuscultation and Percussion. 
Edward G. Loring, Jr., M. D. — Ophthalmology. 
Wm. Gr. IIaurison, M. D. — Normal and Morbid Histolosy. 



CASES OF THE VARIOUS DISEASES, &c., 

HEREIN MENTIONED, 

Mere STreateb in iht gTebkal gepartmcitt of the Baltimore |ufinnarn. 

FROM FEBRUARY IST, 1865, TO FEBRUARY IST, 1866. 



Abortion, 

Amenorrhoea, 

Anasarca, 

Ascites, 

Anaemia, 

Apoplexy, 

Bronchitis,, Acute 

" Chronic 

Carcinoma of Vagina and Uterus, 
Carditis, 
Catarrh, 

Cholera Morbus, 
Cystitis, 

Delirium Tremens, 
Debility, General 
Diphtheritis, 
Dysentery, Acute 

" Chronic 

Dysmenorrhoea, 
Dyspepsia, 
Endocarditis, 
Emphysema of Lungs, 
Emesis, 
Fever, Intermittent 

" Remittent 

'•' Rheumatic 

" Typhoid 

'" Typhus 
Gastritis, Acute 
Heart. Valvular Diseases of 



Heart, Functional Diseases of 

Hemiplegia, 

Hepatitis, 

Icterus, 

Laryngitis, 

Leucorrhoea, 

Lithic Acid Diathesis, 

Lumbago, 

Mania, 

Menorrhagia, 

Melancholia, 

iSTephritis, Acute 

''■ Chronic 
Xeuralgia, 
Paraplegia, 
Paralysis, 
Peritonitis, 
Phthisis, 
Pneumonia, 
Pneumonia, Pleuro 

Typhoid 
Pleuritis, Acute 
Rheumatism, Acute 
'' Chronic 

Arthritic 
Ramollissement, 
Scrofula, 
►Scorbutus, 
Sciatica, 
Variola. 



THE FOLLOWTNG^ 



Mm €xmf.tti in t^e Surgical §tpximtnt of t\iz Baltimore Infirmaru, 

FROM FEBRUARY IST, 1865, TO FEBRUARY IST, 1866. 



Abscess, 

" Lumbar 
" Pharyngeal 
Renal 
Scrotal 
Anthrax, 
Balanitis, 
Burns, 
Calculus, 

Carcinoma of Bladder, 
Cataract, 
Corneitis, 

Concussion of Brain, 
Coxalgia, 
Conjunctivitis, Acute 

" Chronic, 

Dislocations, various 
Eczema, 
Epiphora, 
Epistaxis, 
Erysipelas, 

"" Phlegmonous 
Erythema, 
Fracture of Femur, 

" " comp. com. 

Clavicle, 
'' Cranium, 

Inf. Maxilla, 
Ribs, 

Tibia and Fibula, 
" Tibia, comp. com. 

" Os Temporis, 

'• Ulna, 

*• Phalanges, 

Fistula in Ano, 
Gonorrhoea, 
Gangrene, 
Hernia, Strang. 



Haemorrhoids, 
Hydrocele, 
Impetigo, 
Iritis, 

" Syphilitic 
Necrosis of Fibula, 

" Femur, 

Inf. Max., 
Metatarsal Bone;? 

" Os Calcis, 

Onychia Maligna, 
Orchitis, 
Ophthalmia, Gonorrhoea! 

" Strumous 

Paronychia, 
Paraplegia, Traumatic 
Periostitis, 
Polypus Nasi, 
Potts' Curvature, 
Pterygium, 
Rheumatism, Gonorrhoeal 

" Syphilitic 

Scirrhus, 
Scalds, 

Spermatorrhoea, 
Stricture of Urethra, 
Synovitis^ 
Syphilis, 
Tumor, Ovarian 
Tumors, various 
Tetanus, 
Ulcers, 

Ulceration of Cornea, 
Whitlow, 
Wounds, Gunshot 

" Lacerated 

*■' Contused 

" Incised, of Throat. 



10 



S>0ieiS4L ©PEEATiei! 



Mm gerfonmb as ^ollobs, 



FROM FEBRUARY 1st, 1865, TO FEBRUARY 1st, 1866, 



Amputations of Fingers, 

" Hand, 

'' Arm, 

" at Shoulder Joint, 

" Foot, 

Leg, 
Thigh, 

*' Penis, 

Cataract, Couching 

" Extraction 

Extirpation of Eye, 

" Scirrhous Mamma, 

" Tumors. 

Extraction of Balls, 
Fistula in Ano, operation for 
Fistula, Vesico-Vaginal, " " 



Hydrocele, 
Lithotomy, 

Ligation of various Arteries, 
Necrosis of Inf. Max., oper'n for 
Humerus, " " 
Femur, " '' 

Ovariotomy, 
Paracentesis Abdominis, 
Polypus Xasi, operation for 
Paraphymosis, " " 
Phymosis. '' " 

Plastic Operations, 
Reduction of Luxations, 
Strangulated Hernia, 
Stricture of Urethra, 



11 



Si:te!00Mi£ 0f 




SESSI03Sr 1865-e6- 



NAMES. niECEPTORS. RESIDENCE- 

Anderson, Chas. D Prof. Smitli Maryland. 

Arthur, H. W Dr. Arthur Maryland. 

Backus, John S Dr. Robinson Maryland. 

Baker, N. D Dr. Quigley Virginia. 

Baldwin, Silas Prof. Smith and Dr. Baldwin. Maryland. 

Bateman, Jas. M. H....Dr. Trippe Maryland. 

Beckenbaugh, John M.. Baltimore Infirmary Maryland. 

Berkeley, Carter Dr. Opie and Univer'y of Va. .Virginia. 

Bogue, K. J Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Bohanan , Wm. T Dr. Bohanan Maryland . 

Bond, Y. H Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Brown, Thomas B Balto. Infir'y and Prof. Smith. Maryland. 

Browne, B. Bernard Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Bromwell, J. E., Jr Dr. Mobberly Maryland. 

Burnett, W. H Dr. Healy Maryland. 

Burrington, S. Dr. Huntington Vermont. 

Burton, J. W Dr. Kepler Maryland. 

Caulk, William Dr. Gibson and Prof. Smith... Maryland. 

Chamberlain, ^I. L Drs. L. & C. Chamberlain Massachusetts. 

Chaney, T. M Hicks U. S. A. Gen'l HospL. Maryland. 

Chesley, James B Drs. Osbourn and Scott Maryland. 

C Prof. McSherry and Dr. ') 
Christie, Arthur -j Van Bibber and Balti- [■ England. 

( more Infirmary ) 

C-'^^y. C {'™VSS.;:.".' .!::: 1 Ma^yand. 

Coekey, Charles II Dr. Cornthwaite Maryland. 

Comef'ys, Nathaniel... ■! \r ivn ^ ' ^ " t Maryland. 
'=-^ ' I van ]5ibbcr j -^ 

Coonan, Daniel S Drs. Butler and MilhoUand... Maryland. 



12 

Gotten, Joe Dr. Wood and Prof. McSherry.N. Carolina. 

Crawford, George B Dr. Dickson. Maryland. 

Currj, Wm. H Drs. Dunbar and Rankin Maryland. 

Darling, H Dr. Stonestreet Maryland. 

Donavin, M. W { ^''°Van' BibbTr """^ ^'■- } Pennsylvania. 

Dorsey, R. W { ^'■'' holland"""'""''' '^^'^; } Virginia. 

Duckett, R. J { ^■■^- chlTa'rd^jr''^""' ^""^ } Maryland. 

rProf. McSherry, Baltimore") 
Dudderow, J. M -: Infirmary and Dr. Van [ Maryland. 

( Bibber 3 

Dudley, S. C Dr. Sudler .'..Maryland. 

Eisenhart, Wm. H Dr. Eisenhart Pennsylvania. 

Evans, Wm. W Dr. Skene Maryland. 

Finley, Samuel C Dr. Richardson Maryland. 

Forman, W. B Dr. Hentz Florida. 

Franklin, B. G Dr. Crawford Maryland. 

Fringer, W. K {^'' ^aS,^^.'^.'^'"'!.'!'.^ } ^^"^^ 

Frush, C. V Prof. Smith and Dr. Monkur.. Maryland. 

rt J- T T> -XT- (Drs. Morris, Butler and Mil- } T.T -, , 

Gardiner, J. B. Av.... - Vi n fl l Maryland. 

Gardner, F. B Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Gerry, E. H Prof. Smith Pennsylvania. 

Gettier, Charles P Dr. Weaver Maryland. 

Getzendanner, John W..Dr. Smith Maryland. 

Giddings, Wm. Y Prof. Smith Virginia. 

Gore, James Dr. Dickson Maryland. 

Green, Thomas H Dr. Tucker Maryland. 

Griffith, Alfred Drs. Butler and MilhoUand... Maryland. 

GroflF, J. H Drs. Butler and MilhoUand... New Jersey. 

Haefner, G. A Hicks U. S. A. Gen'l Hosp'l... Maryland. 

Hall. A. E {^"Va'fSr.."'...':^:}^'^- 

Hammond, J. R Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Henry, Robert J Dr. Henry Maryland. 

Hoifmeier, Frank C Dr. Weaver Maryland. 

Holbrook, W. H. H Dr. Holton Maryland. 

Hooper, John R Dr. Henry Maryland. 

Hysore, W. F Hicks U. S. A. Gen'l Hosp'l... 



18 
Jones, Elias Maryland. 

Kealhofer, R. H j^^'^' j^'^and's^ck^.^'!'.'^: } ^^^ 

Kellam, F. C. A Prof. Smith Virginia. 

Kelly, Thomas Dr. Taylor Maryland. 

Kidder, J. H Hicks U. S. A. Gen'l Hosp'l... Maryland. 

Kin^, John T j ^^^;- ^^°^!^^^;^^^"^ ^,^^^^^^^^ 

( Jr., andlialto. innrmary. j -^ 

Kirby, Thomas E Dr. Jenkins Maryland. 

Knight, Louis W Dr. Knight Maryland. 

Knott, James Y Dr. Tucker Maryland. 

Kollock, E. a Dr. Van Bibber Georgia. 

T J 1 -D • -n i^ Dr. Wood. Prof. McSherry ] ^j i„„^ 
Lansdale, Benj. F -^ ^^^ p^ ^^^ g;^^^^ ^ j Maryland. 

Lawson, Lemuel S Dr. Beltz Maryland. 

Leamy, James C Prof. Smith Maryland. 

T 17 rr ATT f Dr. Kinzer, Prof. McSherry ) t^ i 

Le Fevre, H. W s , t^' ^j -d-,, -^ 1- Pennsyl 

( and Dr. Van Bibber... j *' 

T\T 1 rri T n f Balto. Infir'y, Prof. Smith 1 ^^ i a 
Magtuder, Thos. L.C. | ^^^^ DnMagruder j Maryland. 

Marshall, James S Dr. Kemp Maryland. 

Marshall, Robert M... j ^'- ^'''^f, ^'f ^^'^l"" \ Maryland. 
( ry and Dr. V' an Bibber, j 

Maynard, J. H Dr. Simpson Maryland. 

McClure, Wm. J Dr. Peffer Maryland. 

McLeod. A. H Dr. Roberts Maryland. 

McSherry. Wm. Kilty. { ^''"S'^^' bS..'°.^.^!: } M^'yl="><J- 

McSherry, Wm. S Dr. Smith and Prof. McSherry. Maryland. 

Miller, Caspar E Dr. Dwindle Maryland. 

Mills, Wm. V Dr. Lyon, U. S. N Virginia. 

Mitchell, A. B Drs. Donaldson and Chatard.. Maryland. 

Mobberly, J. E Dr. Mobberly Maryland. 

Monmonier, J. C.........Drs. Butler and 3Iilbolland ...Maryland. 

Moore, H. Surg. Thos. Sim, U. S. A^ols...Ohio. 

Moore^ James M Dr. Deaver Maryland. 

Moorehead, Chas. C Dr. Neff Maryland. 

Morrison, Harry C Surg. Peters, U. S. A Maryland. 

^, A rv Ar f Balto. Infir'y and Drs. Don- ) xr i j 

Munoaster, O. M | ,,,,,„„ f,„^ Chatard.... j >Wland. 

Newman, C. M., Jr Dr. Newman... Maryland. 

XT 17 • TT f Balto. Infir'y and Prof. Mc- ) ., , , 

AVoonan,. i^ranois H... - ^, -^ S Maryland. 



vania. 



14 

Norris, John B Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Parvis, J. IT Dr. Stewart Delaware. 

Petherbridge, G. W.. { ^'"^ftridge""^- ^'' ^!"'; } ^Wlar^l- 

Phillips, C. C University of Virginia Virginia. 

Pinekard, F. A Prof. Smith Virginia. 

Piper, W. J Dr. Smith Maryland. 

Price, A. B Dr. Price Maryland. 

Price, Robert J Dr. Holton Maryland. 

Purcell, James B Drs. Donaldson & Chatard, Jr. Missouri. 

Quail, Charles E Dr. Wheeler Maryland. 

Raborg, J. S Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Rennolds, Wm. R University of Virginia Virginia. 

Robertson, Edgar W Dr. Le Cato and Prof. Smith.. Virginia. 

Rosse, Irving C Baltimore Infirmary Maryland. 

Rusk, G. Gr Dr. Monkur Maryland. 

Sampson, E. W Dr. Bates Maryland. 

S^-^'^^-- ^-^- A {^^"°alL'3'a:L?°!:} Maryland. 

Scott, J. Ward, Jr Dr. Hilleary Missouri. 

Sears, James E Dr. Owens Maryland . 

n, XT rr f Drs. Butler and MilhoUand, ) -n •, 

^^'^'''' N- H I Medical Dep't U. S. A. \ P^nJ^^jlvania. 

Skinner, John Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Slaughter, John P Surg. Kemper ...Virginia. 

Slingluff, Frank Dr. Donaldson Maryland . 

Spalding, J. T Maryland. 

Spangler, Wm. H Virginia. 

Stokes, James H Dr. Smith Maryland. 

c. T -D f Pi^o^- McSherry and Dr. f M.r,^^.r.A 
Stone, L.P I Van Bibber {Maryland. 

Strahan, Theo Dr. Bashiell ..Maryland. 

Sweeny, Timothy Dr. Patterson Maryland . 

Symington, John Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Taneyhill, Gr. L., M. D.. University of Maryland, 1865. Maryland. 

Taylor, John A Dr. Bardwell Pennsylvania. 

Theobald, Samuel Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Thomas, T. F Dr. Thomas Maryland. 

,„., 1 ^M XT i^ Prof. McSherry and Dr. ) ^r , -, 
Tilghman, ( has. H... ^^ y^^ j^j^^^^f^. j Maryland. 

Tobey, 0. C Dr. Tobey Maryland. 



15 

^"P-". «• ^^ { "'•■ Sr' vt B?bbt:^ } *^->'-^- 

Troxel, Jacob G Dr. Mehring Maryland. 

Tunstall, A., Jr Dr. Tunstall Virginia. 

Vickcrs, Albert j ^^^^^; ^^^^^'3^ ^^;J,^^^^^ 

[ aidson and thatarcl, Jr. j •' 

Virdin, W. Ward, Jr Maryland. 

Walker, M. M Prof. Smith Virginia. 

Waller, E. R Dr. Dashiell and Prof. Smith.. Maryland. 

Ward, H. C Prof. Smith Maryland. 

Warfield, C Drs. Butler and Milholland... Maryland. 

Webster, J. B Dr. Linthicum Maryland. 

WeUs, Edward D Dr. Wells Maryland. 

Wenner, John J Dr. Bush Virginia. 

White, C. Alward Dr. White Maryland. 

White, N.Smith Drs. N. & C. Brewer Maryland. 

Wniiams, T. C Dr. Williams Virginia. 

Willson, Thomas B Dr. Holton Maryland. 

Wilson, J. B. B Dr. King Maryland. 

Wilson, W. W Drs. Donaldson and Chatard.. Maryland. 

Wolf, F. C Dr. Peffcr Pennsylvania. 

Womack, B. R { ^''' h^o'lk^d^."^^^^^^^ 

Wood, Vinton Dr. Wood Maryland. 

Woodville, Harry Drs. J. & R. Buckler Maryland. 

Worthington, Grco. C....Prof. Smith Maryland. 



/^■i 



16 



^S4®141^® 



At the Annual Coinniencement, held 3Iarch, 1860^ the 

following Candidates Meceived the Degree 

of Doctor in Medicine. 

NAMES. ^ RESIDENCB. 

Anderson , Charles D. .-. Maryland. 

Backus, John S. i. Maryland . 

Beckenbaugh, John M ,' Maryland. 

Bennett, W. H ;; Maryland . 

Berkeley, Carter, t Virginia. 

Bogue, Robert J.i Maryland . 

Bohannan , William T. ; Maryland . 

Brown, Thomas R. : Maryland . 

Burrington, Solon Vermont. 

Burton , J. Woolf .t Maryland. 

Chaney , Thomas M.» Maryland . 

Christie, Arthur .* England . 

Cockey, Charles .j Maryland. 

Comegys, Nathaniel. * Maryland . 

Coonan , Daniel Si Maryland . 

Curry, William B..i Maryland. 

Donavin, Mathew W.i Pennsylvania. 

Duckett, Richard J. y; Maryland. 

Dudderow, John W.^ Maryland . 

Evans, William Warrington Maryland. 

Franklin, Benjamin Gorsuch.V Maryland. 

Fringer , Winfield K .r Maryland. 

Frush , Carroll V. i Maryland . 



17 



Gardiner, J. B. Walbach/. Maryland. 

Griffith, Alfred., Maryland. 

Groff, J. Humphreys.'. New Jersey, 

Hall, AlbonE..^ Ohio. 

Hammond, James Ridgeley.^. Maryland. 

Henry, Robert J. a: Maryland. 

Hooper, John 'R.i Maryland. 

Hysore, William Y.^ Maryland. 

Kealhofer, Richard H.* Maryland. 

Kellam, Frederick C. A.» Virginia. 

Kelly, Thomas, r Maryland. 

Kidder , Jerome H . /. Maryland . 

King, John T.; Maryland. 

Kirby, Thomas Edward. K. Maryland. 

Knight, Louis W:4-;'r. Maryland. 

Knotts, James Valentine . ,' MaryJ and. 

Landsdale , B. Frank, f Maryland, 

Leamy , James C . .n Maryland. 

Marshall, Robert Mr Maryland, 

Maynard , James H. Maryland. 

McClure, William J. Maryland. 

McLeod, Alexander H. * Maryland. 

Mills, William V. / Virginia. 

Mitchell^ Andrew B Marylan i, 

Monmonier, J. Carroll. <. Maryianci. 

Morrison, Harry C. Maryland. 

Muncaster, Otho M.-. Maryland, 

Newman, Casper Michael Maryland. 

Noonan, Francis H.,. Maryland. 

Norris, John B Maryland, 

Petherbridge, Gustavus W,^. Maryland. 

Philips, C. C .; Virginia. 

Price, Robert John . / Maryland. 

Purcell , James Bryan .^ MissourL 

3 



18 



Rennolds, William R..l'^ Virginia. 

lio&se, Irving C Maryland. 

Robertson , Edgar W .1. Virginia. 

Sears, James E Maryland. 

Schley, Frederick A.. Maryland. 

Scott, J. Ward, Jr.i Missouri. 

Shearer, Niles H.i Pennsylvania. 

Skinner, John 0. Maryland. 

Stone, Llewellyn P Maryland. 

Taylor, John A.. Pennsylvania. 

Tilghman . Charles H.'^ Maryland . 

Trapnell, Richard W. t Maryland. 

Tickers, Albert. ; Maryland. 

Virdin, William Ward, Jr.l North Carolina. 

Waller, R. Edward.- Maryland. 

Wilson, William W... Maryland. 

Wilson, Thomas B i Maryland. 

Worthington, George C Maryland. 

Wood ville , Harry . i Maryland . 



19 



riiS, ST^TiTiS, &§, 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 15th of 
October, 1866, and close on the 1st of March, 1867. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and 
Practice of Medicine, Obstetrics, Physiology and Pathol- 
ogy, fifteen dollars each, or one hundred and five dollars for 
the full course ; Practical Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the Clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Hospital as Clinical Assistants. The fee is one 
hundred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

S T .A. T TJ T E S . 

1. Every student attending Lectures must matriculate 
^nd pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The 
matriculation and lecture tickets must be taken out at the 
commencement of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by 
the Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, 
and exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one 
in some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a Thesis 
of his own composition on some subject connected with 
medical science, or a clinical report of not less than six 
cases of disease, drawn up from his own observation. No 
Thesis will be received after the time specified above, but 
by a special vote of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught 
in this School. He must also produce evidence of attend- 
ance, during one session, on Practical Anatomy and 
Clinical Medicine. 



20 

6. The graduation fee, whicli is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to dxamination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a ma- 
jority of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may l)e re-examined, if he desire it ; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations 
on the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which 
is earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon tlie titness of a can- 
didate is based upon their know^ledge of his general attend- 
ance and industry, character and habits, as well as upon 
the result of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly under- 
stood that while any student who has complied v/ith the 
technical requisitions, viz. : matriculation, attendance upon 
Lectures, and the deposit of a Thesis, may appear before 
them for examination, they reserve to themselves, and w^ill 
exercise, the right of making moral as well as intellectual 
qualifications an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, w^ill always be regarded 
as obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 
o'clock P. M., Sundays excepted. No persons, except Phy- 
sicians and Medical Students, are allowed to visit the 
rooms, without special permission from the Professor or 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, Dean. 

g^" Mr. 1 der Smith, the Janitor, who may be found at his house on the 
University grounds, will conduct gentlemen to comfortable and convenienf 
boarding houses. The expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any 
city in the country — good board being obtained at ahoui $5 per week. 



THE 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 



COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE 



BMUTTMOBM im^mMABJT, 




Is constantly open for tlie reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently been , 
erected, containing commodious private apartments separate from I 
the more public portion of the house. Persons from a distance 
requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find tlie Institu- J 
tion admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from five to ten dollars per week, according to the accom- 
modations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. Thomas S. 
Latimer, Kesident Physician. 



W®lv©^ilty Q>t lia^Flaa€^ 



i%tut\i '^mml (^xuuhr 



OF THE 



i#@)& mw Mmmmmm 



!) 




SESSIOIV l^aT-€5^ 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY KELLY Sc PIET, 

PRINTERS, BOOKSELLERS AXD STATIONERS, 
174 BALTIMORE STREET. 



MDCCCLXVII. 



UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



SIXTIETH 

ANNUAL CIRCULAR 

OF THE 

SESSIOnsr lS67-68; 



AND 



Catalogue of Matricnlates and Graduates, 



fe$ESS10r<i 1866-6 r. 



BALTniORE: 

PRINTED BY KELLY & PIET; 

174 BALTIMORE STREET. 



MDCCCLXVI] 



i h^b 



txt 



00fes 



Anatomy. — The Skeleton and the Teeth, Prof. Owen; 
Gray's Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy, Holden's Human 
Osteology. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chem- 
istry, Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics. — Cazeaux's, Churchiirs, Rigby's Midwifery. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lec- 
tures, Williams' Principles of Medicine, Flint's Practice, 
Bennett's Practice, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — U. S. Dispensatory, 
Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Medica, Beck's 
Materia Medica, Garrod's Materia Medica. 

Physiology, Hygiene and General Pathology. — Todd & 
Bowman's Physiological Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, 
Stille's Pathology, Jones' & Seiveking's Pathological Anat- 
omy, Hammond's Hygiene, Virchow's Cellular Pathology. 

Diseases of Women and Children. — West on Diseases of 
Women ; Hewitt on Diseases of Women ; West on Diseases 
of Children; Tanner on Diseases of Children. 



HaiTersitj of Marylaad< 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 

Professor of Surgery. 

W. E. A. AIKIN, M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics. 

RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D., 

Professor of Princij)les and Practice of Medicine. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D., 

Professor of General, Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy. 

SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D., 

Professor of Materia Mcdica and Therapeutics. 

FRANK DONALDSON, M. D., 

Professor of Physiology, Hygiene and General Pathology. 

WM. T. HOWARD, M. D., 

Professor of the Diseases of Woinen and Children. 

JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D, 

Demonstrator of Ancdomy and Adjunct to the Professor of Anatomy. 

ALAN P. SMITH, M. D., 

Adjunct to the Profcssoi' of Surgery. 

FERD. E. CHATARD, Jr., M. D., 

Adjunct to the Professor of Obstetrics. 

W\ CHEW VAN BIBBER, ]\[. D., 

Adjunct to the Professor of Practice. 

J. H. STRAITH, M. D., 

Adjunct to the Professor of Mateiia Medica. 

M. J. De ROSSET, i\I. D., 

Adjunct to the Professor of Chemistry. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Dean of the Faculty. 



(INFIRMARY) FOR 1866. 



Resident Physician THOMAS S. LATIMER, M. D. 

Clinical Clerk R. H. KEALHOFER, M. D. 

Sister Superior SISTER HILARY. 



liniral Assistants, 



SILAS BALDWIN, 
WILLIAM CAULK, 
HENRY DARLING, 
GEORGE H. W. JONES, 
E. G. KOLLOCK, 
WM. S. McSHERRY, " 



W. J. PIPER, 
JUNIUS L. POWELL, 
CHARLES E. QUAIL, 
JAMES H. STOKES, 
M. M. W^ALKER, 
C. WARFIELD, 



N. SMITH WHITE, 



SESsioisr iseT-es- 



The Sixtieth Session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 
14th of October, 1SQ1 , and will end on the 1st of March, 
1868. 

This School commands all the means and advantages in 
use at the present day for giving a complete course of Med- 
ical instruction. Besides the usual Didactic Lectures in 
the various College halls, there are Clinical Lectures in the 
wards of the Hospital attached to the College, which render 
the course of instruction eminently practical. There are 
also public examinations held by the Professors, in which 
all the more advanced students are invited to participate. 
None are recjuired to undergo these public examinations, 
but it is observed that few decline, and all are obviously 
benefited by them. 

In consequence of the facilities possessed by this School 
for ^Clinical Teaching^ special attention is bestowed upon 
this most important method of instruction. The University 
Hospital^ commonly known as the Baltimore lufirmari/, 
which is also the Seamen's Hospital for the Port of Balti- 
more, is in the immediate vicinity of the College. It is 
under the exclusive control of the Faculty, and students 
have at all times free access to its public wards. All the 



6 

operations in surgery are here performed in their presence ; 
and in practical Medicine the indigenous diseases of the 
country, and among the seamen, diseases originating in 
the Tropics and in other distant regions, are always under 
observation and treatment. The Hospital is open not only 
during the Lecture Term, but throughout the year, and 
Clinical instruction, both in Medicine and Surger}^, is given 
regularly by the various Professors at all seasons. 

Within the last year some important changes have been 
made in the organization of the School, which have in- 
(freased, and, it is believed, will still further promote its 
usefulness, by expanding the means of imparting thorough 
medical instruction. 

The Department of the Diseases of Women and Children 
has been erected into a distinct Professorship, which will 
allow a greater degree of attention to be bestowed on these 
most important branches, than has been possible heretofore. 
To this Chair Dr. Wm. T. Howard, of North Carolina, has 
been appointed. 

The Adjuncts to the several Professors will render such 
assistance in the different departments as may be necessarj^ 
and will conduct the Summer Course of Lectures in asso- 
ciation with other gentlemen. 

The facilities afforded for the study of Practical Anatomy 
are unsurpassed. 

The advantages presented by the Hospital have been 
greatly extended by the establishment, under the Adjunct 
to the Professor of Practice, of a clinic, the materials for 
which are supplied by out-patients. 

BALTIMORE SPECIAL DISPENSARY. 

•Further advantages for the Clinical study of diseases are 
offered by the Baltimore Special Dispensary , Avhich is partly 
under the charge of Adjuncts to the members of the Faculty. 
Every facility will be extended to students by the Physi- 
cians and Surgeons in charge of the Special Dispensary, 
for acquiring proficiency in such diseases or forms of disease 
as may be most useful or attractive for special investiga- 



tion, as Diseases of tlie Eye, Diseases of the Skin, Diseases 
of Females and Children, &c. 

BAY-VIEW HOSPITAL, &c. 

The Bay-View Hospital, a magnificent establishment 
attached to the new Baltimore City Almshouse, and tlie 
St. Agnes Hospital, also afford extensive fields for Clinical 
study. There are comfortable arrangements at the Bay- 
View Hospital for resident students. The Home of the 
Friendless and the St. Vincent Foundling Asylum are large 
Hospitals, to which the students have access, and where 
regular Clinical instruction is imparted to them. 



naffi©!^ li)^il@a' 



In addition to the Lectures of the Winter, arrangements 
have been made for a Summer Course of Instruction, which 
will begin on Wednesday, the 2Wi of March, 1867, and will 
continue until the \st of July following. 

This Course is auxiliary and complementary to the Win- 
ter Lectures, and offers to students an opportunity for con- 
tinuous instruction, thereby greatly facilitating the acquisi- 
tion of medical knowledge. It is under the charge of the 
Adjuncts to the Faculty and other gentlemen of experience 
in specialties. 

Attendance upon this Course is not made a requisite for 
graduation, but it is recommended to students to avail 
themselves of the advantages it offers. The Lectures will 
be both theoretical and practical, clinical teaching being 
their prominent feature. 



"8 

Opportunity is offered for Private Instruction by teachers 
of experience, at moderate rates, in Practical Anatomy, 
Operative Surgery, Auscultation and Percussion , Practical 
Midwifery, Chemistry and Microscopy. 

The following gentlemen Avill conduct the Course: 

Jas. H. Butler, M. D. — Operative Surgery and Surgical Anatomy. 
Alan P. Smith, M. D. — Orthopedic Surgery, and Fractures and Disloca- 
tions. 
J. A. Straith, M. D. — Surgical Affections and Diseases peculiar to \Vomen. 
F. E. Chatard, M. D. — Diseases of Cliildren. 
M. J. De Rosset, M. D. — Animal Chemistry. 
Edward G. Loring, 'M. D. — Ophthalmology. 
Wm. G. Harrison, :\r. D.— Histology. 
S. L, Frank, M. D. — Diseases of the Ear. 

Fees for the Course $35.00 

Single Ticket 10.00 



CASES OF THE VARIOUS DISEASES, &c., 

HEREIN MENTIONED 

Mm (Litatcb in l^e Pebical gtparlmcnt of iht WimbtxBii^ Dospttal, 

FKOM FEBRUARY IST, 1866, TO FEBRUARY IST, 1867. 



Anasarca, 

Anorexia^ 

Anaemia, 

Amenorrhoea, 

Bronchitis, 

Bright's Disease, 

Cardiac Diseases, 

Chorea, 

Cephalalgia, 

Constipation, 

Cholera, 

Cholera Morbus, 

Catarrh, 

Coryza, 

Coup de Soliel, 

Dengue, 

Debauch, 

Debility, 

Diarrhoea, Acute 
'■ Chronic 

Dysentery, 

Dyspepsia, 

Diptheria, 

Emphysema, 

Encephalitis, 

Epilepsy, 

Fever, Intermittent 
'' Remittent 
" Typhoid 
'• Typhus 

Hemiplegia, 

Hydrops Pericardii, 



Hypocliondriasis, 

Hysteria, 

Induration of Pyloric Orifice, 

Laryngitis, 

Locomotor Ataxy, 

Mania a potu, 

Measles, 

Nephritis, 

Neuralgia, 

Pericarditis, 

Phthisis Pulmonalis, 

Paraplegia, 

Pleurodynia, 

Pertussis, 

Phlegmasia Dolens, 

Prolapsus Uteri, 

Paralysis, 

Pneumonia, 

" Pleuro 

PIcuritis, Acute 

" Chronic 

" Tubercular 

Rheumatism, Acute 

" Sub-Acute 

" Chronic 

Scrofula, 
Sciatica, 

Seminal Emissions, 
Stomatitis, 
Uraemia, 
Variola, 
Vertigo. 



10 



THE FOLLOWING 

DISEASES AND INJURIES 

Witxt (Trcatcb iit the Surgical g'^F^^'^^i^^''^^ o^ ^^^ Wivabtxsiivi Jjosjiital 

FROM FKBRUART IsT, 1866, TO FEBRUARY IST, 1867. 



I 



Abyccss, simple, 

Hepatic, 
Adenitis, 
Aneurism of Arch of Aorta, 

" Abdominal Aorta, 
Adventitious Cartilage of Knee, 
Anchylosis of Knee Joint, 
Bunion, 
Burns, 
Cancer — of Penis, 

" Inferior Maxilla, 

" Pyloric Orifice, 

" Uterus, 

Calculus, 
Cataract, single, 

" double, 
Caries of various Bones, 
Coxalgia, 
Conjunctivitis, 
Dislocations, various, 
Dysuria, 
Ectropion, 
Eczema, 
Epithelioma, 
Erysipelas, 
Fracture of Cranium, 

" Eadius and Ulna, 

" Humerus, 

" Inferior Maxilla, 

" Femur, 

" Tibia and Fibula, simple 

" '• " comp'd 

Ulna, 
Patella, 
Fistula in Ano, 

" Urinary, 

Fissnra Ani, 

" Recto-Yaginal, 
Furunculi, 
Gangrene, 

Granular Conjunctivitis, 
Gonorrhoea, 
Hernia, Strangulated, 
^' Reducible. 



Hydrocele, 
PI hemorrhoids, 
Impetigo, 
Iritis, simple, 

" Syphilitic, 
Injuries, numerous, 
Mammary Abscess, 
Masturbation, 
Necrosis, of Rib, 

Tibia and Feb., 

" Inf. Max., 

" Femur, 

Ophthalmia, Gonorrhceal, 

'' Traumatic, 

Orchitis, Acute, 

" Chronic, 
Osteo-Sarcoma, 
Periostitis, 
Pernio, 

Polypus Nasi, 
Uteri, 
Prostatitis, 
Paraph ymosis, 
Phymosis, 
Rupia, Syphilitic, 
Syphilis, Primary, 
" Secondary, 
'' Tertiary, 
Scabies, 
Scorbutus, 
Synovitis, Acute, 

" Suh- Acute, 
Stricture, of Urethra, 

" Rectum, 

Spermatorrhoea, 
Strabismus, 
Scirrhus Mammae, 
Tumors, numerous, 
Talipes, 
Tetanus, 

Ulcers, numerous. 
Ulceration of Neck of Uterus, 
Varicocele, 
Wounds, numerous. 



11 



SURGICAL OPERATIONS 



WERE PERFORMED AS FOLLOWH, 



FROM FEBRUARY 1st, 1866, to FKBRUARY 1st, 1867. 



Amputations of Finger?!, 
'' Thigh, 
- Leg, 
" " Mamma, 

" " Penis, 

" at Shoiildev-joint, 

Cataract, Couching 
" Extraction 
Extirpation of Eye, 

<( II Tumors, numerous, 

Division of Spermatic Cord, 
Fistula in Ano, operation for 
" Urinary, " " 

Fissure, Recto Vaginal, operation for 
Hydrocele, of Tunica Vaginalis, " 
Hydrocele of Sperm. Cord, oper'n for 



Inf. Max. Cancer of, removal of 
Lithotomy, 
Ligation of Arteries, 
Necrosis, various operations 
Polypus Nasi, operation for 

Uteri, 
Paraphymosis, " " 
Phymosis, " " 

Plastic Operations, numerous, 
Reductions of Luxations, 
Stricture of Urethra, operations, 

" " Rectum, " 

Strabismus, " 

Strangulated Hernia, " 

Varicocele, " 



12 



I 




bI muixunl 



SESSIOl^sT 1866-67- 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Alston, Bennet P Dr. Williams N. Carolina. 

Anthony, Peyton T Dr. Hall N. Carolina. 

Arthur, J. A Dr. Tyler N. Carolina. 

Aston^ Robert B Dr. Fugate Virginia. 

Bagby, John Univ. of Virginia... Virginia. 

Baker, N. D Dr. Quigly Virginia. 

•o ^^ ' CM f Drs. Smith, Howard and] ,t , i 

2^^''™' S>1='= I Straith.akdUDiv.Hosp'l.r^^'-y'^'"^- 

Barron, Charles H Dr. Mercer N. Carolina. 

Bateman, J. M. H.... I ^'•^•J^ ^'^^''- ^'^"'^''^ | Maryland, 
I and Harrison ) '' 

Bayly, A. W Dr. Lewis Virginia. 

Bayue^ John W Dr. Bayne Maryland. 

Beckham , W. L Virginia . 

Bell, Daniel F Univ. of Virginia Virginia. 

Berney, John Dr. Michel Alabama. 

Belt, G. D Dr. Wells : Maryland. 

Boardman, F. C Dr. McComas Maryland." 

Bordley, James Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Bond, Y. H Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Brodie, Walter Dr. Cheatham N. Carolina. 

Bromwell, J. E Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. • 

Browne, B. Bernard Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland, 

Boteler, George W Dr. Yourtee Maryland. 

Campbell, L. F Winchester College, Ya Virginia. 

n 11 TTT-n- f Drs. Smith, Howard and ] ^r ■, j 

Caalk, Wilham | ^^^^.^^^ ^^^ ^-^5^^ ^^^,^ j Maryland. 

Caveness, Isaac F Dr. Foust N. Carolina. 

Chesley, James B Dr. Osborne Maryland. 



13 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

nu rru T ^ ^^'^- ^^ai^ Bibber, ChatarJ | tvt.,^ i^„j 
Chew, Thomas J | ^^^^ ^j^^,^-^^^ | Maryland. 

Clagett, Jos. E.,M. D Maryland. 

Cline, William S Dr. Cline Virginia. 

Cockey, Charles H Dr. Stevenson Maryland. 

Cordell, Eugene F Dr. Cordell Virginia. 

Gotten, J Dr. Wood N. Carolina. 

Crawford, George B Dr. Dickson Maryland. 

Craven, John A., Jr. ...Dr. Foust N. Carolina. 

Crogan, John M Dr. Ilenkle Maryland. 

T^ ,. TT r Drs. Butler and Milholland, ] ,r , , 
Darhng, Henry | ^^^ ^niv. Hospital ) ^^^j'^"^' 

Dausch, Peter Dr. Borck '. M ary land . 

Davidson, B. B Univ. of Virginia Maryland. 

Devilbis, James E Dr. Waters Maryland. 

Dudley, S. C Dr. Sudler Maryland. 

Early, Wm. W Drs. Butler and Milholland... Maryland. 

Eckenrode, D. M Dr. Baltzell Pennsylvania. 

Eichelberger, C. D Dr. Eichelberger .Maryland. 

Eichelberger, J. W Dr. Eichelberger Maryland. 

Eisenhart, Wm. H Dr. Eisenhart Pennsylvania. 

England, F. F Dr. Stone Maryland. 

Ennett, W. T Dr. Ennett N. Carolina. 

Farmer, John W Dr. Stearnes Virginia. 

Finley, S. C Dr. Richardson Maryland. 

Forman, Wm. B Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Florida. 

Fowler, Allen Univ. of Virginia W. Virginia. 

Frey, B. R Dr. Reeves W. Virginia. 

Gardner, F. B Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Gerry, E. H Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Pennsylvania, 

Getzendanner, John AV..Dr. Charles Smith Maryland. 

Gibbons, Jos. E Dr. Hershey Maryland. 

Giddings, Wm. V Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Virginia. 

Gore, James Dr. Dickson Maryland. 

Green, Hugh R Dr. Green Virginia. 

Green, Thomas H Dr. Tucker Maryland. 

Gorsuch, S. N Dr. F. Butler Maryland. 

Gott, Richard T Dr. Mott Maryland. 

Green way, G . C Virginia . 

Grimes, Henry J Dr. Buffington Maryland. 



14 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Grinder, E. D Dr. Zimmerman Maryland. 

Haefner, G. A Dr. Dohme : Maryland. 

Hall, James B Dr. Hall N. Carolina. 

Hamilton, Wm. A Drs. Smith, Howard (t Straitli. Maryland. 

Harkiu, Wesley Dr. Shoemaker .Maryland . 

Harman, John D Dr. Walls Maryland. 

Hartman , J. H Maryland . 

Hoflfmeier, Frank C Dr. Weaver Maryland. 

Hoge, G. D Dr. Leutli Virginia. 

Holbrook, E. H Dr. Dashiell Maryland. 

HoUyday, Guy Drs. P. and F. F. Smith Maryland. 

Horn, L. C Dr. Liuthicum Maryland. 

Howard, C. G Dr. Michel Alabama. 

Howard, H. S Dr. Michel Alabama. 

Hunt, L. C Dr. Reeves W. Virginia. 

Hunter, T. C Univ. o^ Virginia Virginia. 

Jennings, Wm. T Univ. of Virginia Virginia. 

Johnson, J. M., M. D...Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1852. N. Carolina. 

r n TT \\r f Drs. Butler and Milholland ") -^^ i a 
Jones, George H. W . | ^^^ ^niv. Hospital | Maryland. 

Jones, H. H Univ. of Virginia Virginia. 

Kendal, Wm. T Dr. Cage Mississippi. 

Kirby, T. Edw'd, M.D..Univ. of Maryland, 1866 Maryland. 



M. 



-Dr. Lewis • Virginia. 



Kirk, W 

Knight, S. T., Jr Dr. Knight Maryland. 

Lawrence, D. H Dr. Lawrence Maryland. 

Laws, Thomas L Dr. J. L. Settle Virginia. 

Lawson, Lemuel S Dr. Beltz Maryland. 

Le Fevre, H. W Dr. Kinzer Pennsylvania. 

Lewis, Henry G Dr. Lewis N. Carolina. 

Lewis, J. S Dr. Brown Virginia. 

Lewis, Warner, Jr Univ. of Virginia Virginia. 

Ligget, John J Dr. Ligget Maryland. 

Luptou, J. L. F Dr. Lupton Virginia. 

Magruder, T. L. C Maryland. 

Mapp, John E Dr. Finney Virginia. 

Marbury, Wm. A Dr. Bayne ....Maryland. 

Marshall, J. A Dr. Baxley Virginia. 

Marshall, J. S Dr. Kemp Maryland. 

McGill, Wardlaw Dr. McGill Maryland. 










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15 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

T.r r ui- 17 V i J^i*s. Van Bibber, Chatard ) -.-. • • 
'=' ' I and Harrison 3 

Tvr oi ^^r Tr^^. f Drs. Van Bibber, Chatard ] t., , , 
McShGrry, ^A m. Kilty ^ i t t • ^Maryland. 

•^ -^ [ and Harrison J -' 

^r oi T-ir o f I^J'S- y^T^ Bibber. Chatard & l -.^ , i 

McSherry, Wm. S...o ht • i tt • tt m -Maryland. 

*^' ( Harrison and Univ. Hos 1. j -^ 

Miller, Jacob L Dr. Miller Maryland. 

Moore, James M Dr. Dearer 3[aryland. 

Moorehead, Chas. C Dr. Dohme Maryland. 

Munroe, Thomas F Dr. Henby Florida. 

Myers, H. K Dr. Caslow Pennsylvania. 

Naylor, Wm. L Drs. Smith, Howard &Straith.Dist. Columbia. 

Newbill, Wm. J Dr. Jeffries Virginia. 

Palmer, And'w D., M. D Maryland. 

Parvis, J. H .Dr. Stewart Delaware. 

Perry, J. D Dr. Moore X. Carolina. 

PetIierbridge,G.W.,M.D.Univ. of Maryland, 1866 Maryland. 

Petters, W. G Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Texas. 

Pinckard, F. A Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Virginia. 

1-,. ^jr T f Drs. Butler and Milholland 1 ^^ ^ j 

Piper, >V . J - J TT • TT -i. 1 r Maryland. 

^ ( and Univ. Hospital j -^ 



Powell, Junius L Univ. of Va. & Univ. Hosp'l.. Virginia. 

Price, A. B Drs. Butler and Milholland... Maryland. 

Price, J. T Dr. Price Maryland. 

r\ -i ni. ^ T^ f I^i'S- Butler and Milholland ") ,, ^ j 
Quail, Charles E ^ ^^^ ^^.^ g^^p.^^^ | Maryland. 

Raborg, J. S... Dr. F. B. McManus Maryland. 

Rennolds, Henry T Dr. Hartman Maryland. 

-r, 11 T u T^ (Drs. Van Bibber, Chatard") -^f , , 
Reynolds, John E | ^^^ Harrison.... | Maryland. 

Rusk, G, G Dr. Monkur Maryland. 

Russell, C. F Dr. J. W. Taylor Virginia. 

Seawell, V. N Dr. Secroy N. Carolina. 

Scott, L Drs. Barber and Scott Missouri. 

Shertzer, A. T Dr. Plarlan Maryland. 

Shields, J. W Dr. Thompson Indiana. 

Shiply, W. S Dr. Herring Maryland. 

Skinner, W. T Dr. Holland Maryland. 

Slaughter, John P Virginia. 



16 

NAMES. rRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

cr 1 n- 1? 1 f Drs. Van Bibber, Chaiard ) t.^ i j 
bhngluff, Frank | and Harrison.... | Maryland. 

Spalding, John T Dr. Spalding Maryland. 

Sparrow, Stephen P Dr. Hodges N. Carolina. 

Spence, W. A., M. D Maryland. 

Stokes, Jas. H Maryland . 

Stein , A . E Maryland . 

Strahan, Theo Dr. Dashiell Maryland. 

Strother, Edwin F S. Carolina. 

Summers, James P Dr. Herring Maryland. 

Sweeny, T. C Dr. Patterson Maryland. 

Sweeting, J. K. P Dr. McManus Maryland. 

Symington, John Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Taneyhill, G. L., M.D..Univ. of Maryland, 1865 Maryland. 

Theobald, Samuel Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Thomas, C. B Dr. Johnson Maryland. 

Thomas, S. F Dr. Thomas Maryland. 

Thompson, Il.Il.,M.D.. Univ. of Maryland, 1855 Maryland. 

Thompson. S. G- Drs. Butler and Milholland... Maryland. 

Thomson, Charles Dr. Annan Maryland. 

Tiffany, L. McL Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Travers, Edward Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Troupe, Samuel C Dr. O. J. Smith Maryland. 

Troxel, J. G- Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Truitt, George T Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Tutwiler, H. A Univ. of Virginia Alabama. 

Van Lear, A. G. L Drs. Smith, Howard <S/ Straith. Virginia. 

Waldo, S. P N. Carolina. 

Walls, J. W., M. D Virginia. 

T-ir 11 nr TIT ( 1^1'S- Smith, Howard and ) ^r- • • 

Walker, M. M | ^^^^^^^^ ^;j ^^.^ jj„^p,,_ j \ .rginia. 

Waples, J. B Dr. Houston Delaware. 

Ward, H Clay Drs. Smith, Howards Straith. Maryland. 

„r n ^^ n f I^^s. Butlcr and Milholland ") t., -, j 
Warfield, C | ^„^ ^niT. Hcspital [Maryland. 

Waring, J. L Drs. Butler and Milholland... Maryland. 

Warren, E. P Dr. Warren Pennsylvania. 

Warren, L. A Dr. Warren Pennsylvania. 

Watkins, Wm. C Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Wells, Edward D Dr. Wells Maryland. 



17 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Wells, R. C Drs. Smith, Howard &Straith. 

Welty, F. H Drs. Smith, Howard & Straith. Maryland. 

Wenner, John J Dr. Bush Virginia. 

White, Alward Dr. White Maryland. 

TTTu-A AT o 'L\ f Drs. Van Bibber, Chatard <fc } T.M- , , 

White, N. Smith ■< tt • j t- • tt ^^ h Maryland. 

( Harrison, and Lniv. Hosl. j -^ 

Williams, E Dr. Lynch Maryland. 

Williams, J. B., Jr Dr. Williams < N. Carolina. 

Williams, T. C Dr. P. C. Williams Virginia. 

Wilson, J. B. B Dr. King Maryland. 

Wilson, James H Dr. Thompson Maryland. 

Wood, R. V Dr. J. X. Wood Maryland. 

Wolfe, S. B Dr. Dawson Ohio. 

Wright, W. A Dr. Drake N. Carolina. 

Zepp, Leonard Dr. Herring .Maryland. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c. 



The next session will begin on Monday, the 14th of 
October, 1867, and close on the 1st of March, 1868. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and 
Practice of Medicine, Obstetrics, Physiology, and Pathol- 
ogy, and Diseases of Women and Children, fifteen dollars 
each, or one hundred and twenty dollars for the full course ; 
Practical Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the Clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be j^ermitted to reside 
in the Hospital as Clinical Assistants. The fee is one hun- 
dred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

1. Every student attendinf^ Lectures must matriculate 
and pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The 
matriculation and lecture tickets must be taken out at the 
commencement of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, 
and exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this school, or one in this after one 
in some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a Thesis 
of his own composition on some subject connected with 
medical science, or a clinical report of not less than six 
cases of disease, drawn up from his own observation. No 
Thesis will be received after the time specified above, but 
by a special vote of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught in 
this School. He must also produce evidence of attendance, 
during one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical 
Medicine. 



19 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate Can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a ma- 
jority of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desires it; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations 
on the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which 
is earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a can- 
didate is based upon their knowledge of liis general attend- 
ance and industry, character and habits, as well as upon 
the result of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wisli it to be distinctly under- 
stood that while any student who has complied with the 
technical requisitions, viz: matriculation, attendance upon 
Lectures, and the deposit of a Thesis, may appear before 
them for examination, they reserve to themselves, and will 
exercise, the right of making moral as well as intellectual 
qualifications an element of tlieir decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded 
as obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock 
P. M., Sundays excepted. Ko persons, except Physicians 
and Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms, with- 
out special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator 
of Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGEE, Dean. 



'Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, tvho may he found at his house on the 
University grounds, will conduct gentlemen to comfortable and convenient 
hoarding houses. The expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any 
city in the country — good hoard being obtained at about $5 per week. 



THE 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 



COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE 




Is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. The Institution contains com- 
modious private apartments separate from the more public portion 
of the house. Persons from a distance requiring surgical treat- 
ment, or operations, will find the Institution admirably adapted to 
this purpose. 

Board from five to ten dollars per week, according to the accom- 
modations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. Thomas S. 
Latimer, Kesident Physician. 



IMVlEilf T at MAltliAMB^ 



SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OK THE 




A^wi $1 Mikinrnt 




sEssioisr I8e8-e9- 



BALTIMORE : 

PRINTED BY KELLY & PIET, 

PJiiyTERS, BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS. 
174 BALTIMORE STREET. 

MDCCCLXVIII. 



\ 



SIXTY-FIRST 



ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 





SESSIOIT 1868-69; 



Pihh^M 4 w^trkwMt^ and Maiuata, 



SEssioisr issT'-es. 



I ^tm I 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY KELLY ^ PIET, 

174 BALTIMOEE STEEET. 



MDCCCLXVIII. 



t:^jrf l^^^U. 



- Anatomy. — The Skeleton and the Teeth, Prof. Owen ; 
Gray's Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy, Holden's Human 
Osteology. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Erichsen's 
Surgery, Gross' Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy.— Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Brande and Taylor's 
Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chemistry_, Parrish's Prac- 
tical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics. — Cazeaux's^ Churchill's, Kighy's Midwifery. 

Principles and Practice op Medicine. — Watson's Lec- 
tures, Williams' Principles of Medicine, Flint's Practice, 
Bennett's Practice, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — U. S. Dispensatory, 
Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Medica, Beck's 
Materia Medica, Garrod's Materia Medica. 

Physiology, Hygiene and General Pathology. — Todd & 
Bov/man's Physiological Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, 
Jones' & Seiveking's Pathological Anatomy, Hammond's 
Hygiene, Virchow's Cellular Pathology. 

Diseases of Women and Children. — Hewitt on Diseases 
of Women ; Thomas on Diseases of Women ; West on Dis- 
eases of Women ; West on Diseases of Children ; Tanner 
on Diseases of Children. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



:n"athan e. smith, m. d.. 

Professor of Surgery. 

W. E.A.AIKIN, M. D., LL. D., 
Professor of Ohemisiry and Pharmacij. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 
Professor of Ohsieirics. 

RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D., 
Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTO^L M. D., 
Professor of General, Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy. 

SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D., 
Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

FRANK DONALDSON, M. D., 
Professor of Physiology, Hygiene and General Pathology. 

WM. T. HOWARD, M. D, 
Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children. 

JAMES H. BUTLER, M. D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy and Adjunct to the Professor of Anatomy. 

ALAN P. SMITH, M. D., 
Adjunct to the Professor of Surgery. 

J. H. STRAITH, M. D., 
Adjunct to the Professor of Materia Medica. 

M. J. De ROSSET, M. D., 
Adjunct to the Professor of Physiology. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 
Dean of the Faculty. 



(INFimiAItY) FOR 1867. 



I 



Kesident Physician THOMAS S. LATIMER, M. D. 

- JUNIUS L. POWELL, M. D. 

Clinical Clerks } 

WM. D. BOOKER, M. D. 

Sister Superior SISTER HILARY. 



liniral Assistants 



K D. BAKER, THOS. F. MUNROE, 

GEO. W. BOTELER, WM. J. NEWBILL, 

J. M. CROGAN, FRANK SLINGLUFF, 

R. T. GOTT, T. C. SWEENEY, 

H. J. GRIMES, WM. C. WATKINS, 

J. G. HOLLYDAY, F. H. WELTY. 



©nitJ^rsitg of Sarglantr, 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 

SESSION 1868-69. 



The Sixty-First Session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 
19th of October, 1868, and will end on the 1st of March, 
1869. 

A preliminary Course of Lectures will be delivered, com- 
mencing on Monday, the 5th of October. 

The School of Medicine in the University of Maryland is 
one of the oldest Schools in the Union, ranking either third 
or fourth in point of age among them. Her alumni, scat- 
tered over the whole south and south-west^ still cherish, it 
is trusted, some remembrance of the Alma Mater in whose 
halls they were trained, and will welcome the announce- 
ment of her continued prosperity. To them the present 
Faculty would commend her, with the confident assurance, 
that her means for bestowing a complete medical education 
have been conspicuously increased, and that, so far as in 
them lies, they will always endeavor to maintain her an- 
cient reputation, by devotion to the duties of their position, 
and by a hearty co-operation in all the movements which 
have in view the elevation and improvement of the medical 
profession. 

This School commands all the means and advantages in 
use at the present day for giving a complete course of Med- 
ical instruction. Besides the usual Didactic Lectures in 



the various College halls, there are Clinical Lectures in the 
wards of the Hospital attached to the College, which render 
the course of instruction eminently joractical. There are 
also public examinations held by the Professors, in which 
all the students are invited to participate. None are re- 
quired to undergo these public examinations, but it is 
observed that few decline, and all are obviously benefited 
by them. 

In consequence of the facilities possessed by this School 
for Clinical Teaching, special attention is bestowed upon 
this most important method of instruction. The University 
Hospital, commonly known as the Baltimoi^e Irtfirmaiy, 
which is also the Seamen's Hospital for the Port of Balti- 
more, is in the immediate vicinity of the College. It is 
under the exclusive control of the Faculty, and students 
have at all times free access to its public wards. All the 
operations in surgery are here performed in their presence ; 
and in practical Medicine the indigenous diseases of the 
country, and among the seamen, diseases originating in 
the Tropics and in other distant regions, are always under 
observation and treatment. The Hospital is open not only 
during the Lecture Term, but throughout the year, and 
Clinical Instruction, both in Medicine and Surgery, is given 
by the various Professors at all Seasons. 

The Course of Instruction in the several departments is 
comprised in the following schedule : 

l.—Surgery» 

pROF. Nathan K. Smith, M. D. 

The Chair of Surgery includes the Principles and Prac- 
tice of Surgery. Surgery is regarded as a practical art 
founded upon intelligible principles, and the whole object 
of the teacher is to enforce and illustrate these principles, 
and to apply them before the class in actual practice within 
the University Hospital. The Course of Lectures is further 
illustrated by a large collection of casts, drawings, models 
and preparations. 



II,--Chefmstry and JPhannacy. 

Prof. William E. A. Aiken, M. D. 

The Course will include a notice of those molecular forces 
which are active in all chemical changes ; the nomenclature 
of the science ; the use of Chemical symbols as the written 
language of Chemistry ; the laws of combination ; the 
properties of such elements and compounds as have any 
practical interest for the Physician ; the reactions of the 
pharmaceutical processes of the Pharmacopoeia ; the applica- 
tions of the science to Toxicology, and the Chemistry of or- 
ganic bodies, so far as this can throw any light upon the 
functions of the human system in health or disease. For 
these purposes the apparatus in this dejDartment furnishes 
facilities not surpassed, if equalled anywhere. And as the 
science can only be successfully taught by the aid of experi- 
mental illustrations, these will be constantly employed to 
make the Lectures instructive and impressive. 

Ill,— Obstetrics, 

Prof. G-eorgb W. Miltenberger, M. D. 

In this department the science of Obstetrics is taught in 
as practical a manner as possible. This is accomplished 
by taking up the consideration of labor as soon as the stu- 
dent is prepared for it by an acquaintance with the Anato- 
my and Physiology of the organs which are concerned in 
it, and with the foetus in its relations to pregnancy and 
parturition. The Course is illustrated by numerous draw- 
ings of large size, by models, and by the mannikin. 

IV,— Principles and Practice of Medicine, 

Prof. Richard McSherry, M. D. 

The instructions in this important branch are eminently 
practical. The Didactic Lectures delivered at the College 
find immediate application in the wards of the University 



8 

Hospital, so that theory and practice are brought to bear 
simultaneously in the instruction of the classes. Thus the 
Professor makes Didactic and Clinical Lectures support and 
enforce each other, so that the student enjoys the inestima- 
ble advantage of seeing nearly every disease under treat- 
ment while he is hearing of it in the lecture-room, or read- 
ing of it in the text-books . 

V, — General, Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy, 

Prof. Christopher Johnston, M. D. 

Anatomy will be taught in the most practical manner 
possible ; wherefore the lectures upon this fundamental 
branch of medical learning will be amply illustrated with 
preparations, models, plates, drawings, and the dissected 
cadaver. 

As the science is progressive, and constantly enlarging 
its limits, its actual status will be insisted upon ; and 
while compared anatomy, and even physiology, or anatomy 
in action, will be called into requisition in the elucidation 
of particular points, all teaching will converge towards 
such a correct understanding of the human body and its 
parts as shall fit the student in medicine and surgery for 
the advantageous application of his knowledge. 

It is also in contemplation to illustrate histology with 
micro-photographs and microscopic ^^reparations exhibited 
in the magic lantern. 

An abundant supply of material ensures to the attentive 
student an opportunity for the apprehension of the princi- 
ples and the facts of descriptive and surgical anatomy, an 
appreciation indispensable to the clinical student and the 
medical or surgical practitioner. 

VI,-~Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 

Prof. Samuel C. Chew, M. D. 

In this department special attention is bestowed upon the 
modes of action and the effects of medicines, and their 



9 

applications in the treatment of diseases, constituting the 
science of Therapeutics, which is regarded as the most im- 
portant, as it is the most interesting subject assigned to 
this Chair. The lectures on Materia Medica are amply 
illustrated with a cabinet of specimens of the various sub- 
stances described, which are submitted to the examination 
of the class, and with an extensive collection of accurate 
colored engravings of medical plants, both indigenous and 
exotic. 

VIL—PJiysiologij^ Hygiene and General Pathology, 

Prof. Fraxk Donaldsox, M. D. 

The lectures on Physiology will be of a thoroughly prac- 
tical character ; such points will be insisted upon as have 
been most clearly demonstrated by the researches of experi- 
mental physiologists. 

The course will be illustrated by numerous plates and 
drawings, most of which have been copied by photography, 
and enlarged, from the works of the most approved authors. 
The students are taught that modern Physiology is not an 
isolated science, but one having a direct bearing upon prac- 
tical medicine, and in fact, the foundation of rational medi- 
cine. Its study will, therefore, be urged upon them as of 
paramount importance. 

Hijgiene will form a prominent part in the instruction, 
and the attention of students will be called to the import- 
ance of due regard being always paid to the observance of 
hygienic and sanitary laws in the preservation of health 
and in the treatment of disease. 

General Patliology will be studied as the Physiology of 
Disease, and its laws as possessions of physiological phe- 
nomena. 

Pathological Anatomy. — There wall be one lecture every 
week, occupied principally w^ith the demonstrations of mor- 
bid anatomy, of which ample material is collected from the 
hospitals and dispensaries of the city. In this way the stu- 
dent will have opportunities of becoming familiar with the 
pathological lesions of a large number of diseases. 
2 



10 



VIII.— Diseases of Woinen anil Children, 

Prof. Wai. T. Howard, M. D. 

Tlie rapid advances made of late years in the etiology, 
pathology and therapeutics of the diseases of women and 
children, have necessitated a division of the Chair of Ob- 
stetrics, in which they were formerly included. 

The diseases of Infants and Children will be first investi- 
gated. Preliminary lectures will be given on the peculiari- 
ties of organization and function incident to the periods of 
infancy and childhood, and the laws of pathology, hygiene 
and therapeutics resulting from them. Next will follow 
lectures upon Diagnosis and Prognosis, and lastly special 
diseases will be thoroughly investigated. 

The lectures upon the Diseases of Women will commence 
with an explanation of the surgical anatomy of the genera- 
tive system, and the methods of uterine diagnosis. The 
different displacements of the uterus will be illustrated by 
accurate drawings, and the recent operations in uterine sur- 
gery will be clearly demonstrated. 

As far as possible the doctrines taught in the didactic 
lectures will be illustrated and enforced at the clinic. 

Practical Anatomy, 

James H. Butler, M. D. 

The dissecting room is in charge of the Demonstrator, 
who superintends and directs the classes in their dissections. 
Anatomical material is abundant, and furnished at mode- 
rate expense. Indeed, it is doubted if any school in the 
country can equal the facilities afforded here. The rooms 
are convenient, well warmed, ventilated, and lighted. 

The Demonstrator passes much time in assisting the stu- 
dents, and in guiding their labors. Access may be had to 
the rooms at all hours of the day, until 10 o'clock, P. M., 
when the Janitor closes them for the night. 

The Faculty wish it to be understood, that the advantages 
offered for the pursuit of Practical Anatomy are not merely 



11 

nominal. They refer with pride to the zeal and industry 
of the classes during the past session, and trust, that the 
opportunity for studying Anatomy, which none can neglect 
with impunity, may continue to he appreciated and im- 
proved. 

CLIJSnCAL LBCTURBS. 

Daring the Session of the College, Clinical Lectures will 
be delivered daily, as follows : 
A Surgical Clmiqiie, by Prof. Johnston, on Monday. 
A Clinique on Diseases of Women and Children^ by Prof. 

Howard, on Tuesday. 
A Surgical Clinique, by Prof. Smith, on AVednesday. 
A Medical Clinique^ by Prof. McSherry, on Wednesday. 
A Medical Clinique , by Prof. Chew, on Thursday. 
A Clinique on Diseases of the Heart, Lungs and Throat, 

ivith special attention to instruction in Auscultation and 

Percussion and the use of the Laryngoscope, by Prof. 

Donaldson, on Friday. 

A Surgical Clinique, by Prof. Smith, on Saturday. 

A Medical Clinique, by Prof. McSherry, on Saturday. 

A Course of Lectures on the Physiology and Pathology 
of the Kidney and its Secretion will be delivered by Dr. M. 
J. De Kosset, Adjunct to the Professor of Physiology. 
This will be illustrated by cases brought before the Class, 
by the application of tests to the urine, and by the use of 
the microscope. 

Instructions will also be given in other special branches, 
by Dr. Alan P. Smith, Adjunct to the Professor of Surgery, 
by Dr. Jas. H. Butler, Adjunct to the Professor of Anatomy, 
and by Dr. J. H, Straith^, Adjunct to the Professor of Ma- 
teria Medica. 

There is also a Clinique for Diseases of the Dye, by Dr. 
Eussell Murdoch. 

The facilities afforded for the study of Practical Anatomy 
are unsurpassed. 



12 



TINIVEBSITY niSJPEJSSABY. 

A Dispensary for out-patients is established in connection 
with the University Hospital, whereby the Clinical field of 
that Institution is very much enlarged. 

This is under the charge of the members of the Faculty, 
and in it, as well as in the wards of the Hospital, daily 
Clinical Instruction is given by them. 

BALTIMOMB SPECIAL BISJPJEJSSABY. 

Further advantages for the Clinical study of diseases are 
offered by the Baltimore Special Dispensary, which is partly 
under the charge of Adjuncts to the members of the Faculty. 
Every facility will be extended to students by the Physi- 
cians and Surgeons in charge of the Special Dispensary, 
for acquiring proficiency in such diseases or forms of disease 
as may be most useful or attractive for special investiga- 
tions_, as Diseases of the Eye, Diseases of the Skin, Diseases 
of Females and Children, &c. 

BAT-VIEW ffOSJPITAL, &c. 

The Bay-Vieio Hospital, a magnificent establishment at- 
tached to the new Baltimore City Almshouse, and the St. 
Agnes Hospital, also afford extensive fields for Clinical study. 
There are comfortable arrangements at the Bay-Yiew Hos- 
pital for resident students. 



I 



13 



CASES OF THE VARIOUS DISEASES, &c,, 



HLREIN MENTIONED, 



[crc ^rfiitcb in lire JITebicul gepadncut of Ibe Hniberstfg hospital. 
From February 1st, 1867, to February 1st, 18G8. 



Alcoholism, 

Amenorrhoei, 

Angemia, 

Anasarca, 

Apoplex}', 

Ascites, 

Asthma, 

Bright's Disease, 

Bronchitis, Acute 
" Chronic 

Chorea, 

Coryza, 

Debilit}', 

Delirium Tremens, 

Diarrhoea, Acute 
" Chronic 

Diptheria, 

Dropsy Cardiac, 
" Renal, 

Dysentery, Acute 
" Chronic 

Dyspepsia, 

Emphysema, 

Enteritis, 

Epilepsy, 

Febricula, 

Fever, Bilious 
" Intermittent 
" Remittent 



Fever, Typhoid, 

" Tvphus 

" Yellow 
Gangrene of Lunj^;?, 
Gastritis, 
Gout, 

Heart, Organic Disease of 
Hysteria, 
Icterus, 
Insanity, 

Laryngitis, Tubercular 
Measles, 
Menorrhagia, 
Neuralgia, 
Paralysis of Hand, 
Paraplegia, 
Pericarditis, 
Pertussis, 
Pleuritis, Acute 
Pleuritis, Chronic 
Pneumonia, 
Rheumatism, Acute 
" Chronic 

" Subacute 

Sciatica, 

Tuberculosis, Pulmonary 
Uterus, Chronic Inflammation of 
Uterus, Ulceration of 



14 



THE FOLLOV/ING 



DISEASES AND INJURIES 
%^txt ^vatnt in i)xt ^wxt^iaxl St\n\xi\\\a\i '4nircv.sitij go;&pital, 

FROM FEBRUARY 1st, 1867, to FEBRUARY 1st, 1868. 



Abscess, Mammary, 
" Perinaeal, 
" Elsewhere, 

Adenitis. 

Balanitis, 

Bladder, Paralysis of 

Burns, 

Calciilus, Urinarj', 

Cancer of Breast, 
" «' Penis, 
" '' Anus, 
" " other parts, 

Carbuncle, 

Cataract, 

Concussion of Brain, 

Conjunctivitis, 

Coxalgia, 

Cystitis, Acute, 
" Chronic, 

Dislocations, various, 

Dysuria, 

Ectropion, 

Elephantiasis, 

Epididymitis, 

Epithelioma of Nose, 
" " Foot, 

'' Leg, 
" " Hand, 

Epulis, 

Erysipelas, 

Erythema Nodosum, 

Fauces, Ulceration of, 

Fissure of Anus, 

Fistula in A no, 

" Vesico- Vaginal, 

" Recto- Vaginal. 

Fractures of Clavicle, 
" " Femur, 
" ♦' Humerus, 
" " Leg, 
" *' Metatarsus, 
" " Olecranon, 
" " Patella, 

'' Ribs, 
" " Ulna, 

Gonorrhoea, 

Haemorrhoids, 



Hernia, Inguinal, 

' ' Femoral 
Hydrocele, 
Hydro-Sarcocele, 
Icihyosis, 
Trido-Choroiditi.5", 
Keratitis. 

Laceration of Perina^am, 
Larynx, Fistula of 
Necrosis of Foot, 

" " Fibula, 

" " Infer. Maxilla, 
" Rib, 

'^ " Fibia, 
Neuroma, 

Ophthalmia, Acute, 
" Chronic, 

" Tarsi, 

Orchitis, 
Pernio, 
Paronychia, 
Phymosis, 
Prostate, Enlarged, 
Prurigo, 
Psorisis. 
Ptyalism, 
Pyemia, 
Scrofula, 
Sprain, 

Stricture of Urethra, 
Synovitis of Knee, 
Syphilis, 

Tumors, various, 

Ulcer of Fauces, 

" " Hand, 

" " Varicose, 
Uterus Polypus of, 
" Procidentia of, 
" Prolapse of. 
Varicocele, 
"WhitloWj 

Wounds, Contused, 
" Lacerated, 
'• Incised, 
" Punctured. 



15 



SURGICAL OPERATIONS 



WERE PERFORMED AS FOLLOWS 



From Fkbruary 1st, 1867, to February 1st, 1868. 



Amputations, various, 
Applying Ant. Splint, 

" Other yplints, 
Cataract, op. for 
Excision of Inf. Maxilla, 

" Tibia, 

Extirpation of Neuroma, 

" Scirrhus, 

" Breast, 

Extraction of Balls, 
Lithotomy, 

Maisonneuve's oper. for strict. Urethra, 
Opening Abscess in Perinaeura, 
Operation for Fistula in Ano, 



Operation in Larynx, 

" Hydrocele, 

" Lacerated Perineum, 

" Phymosis, 

" Strabismus, [sutures, 

" Varix by twisted 

" Vesico-Vag. Fistula, 

Reduction of Dislocations, various, 

" Hernia, 

Removal of Carious Bone, 

" Epithelioma, 

" Various Tumors, 

Tapping. 



I^lskgrni 0f fiatjrkmlsfes. 



SESSionxr isey-ss 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

*! A^, T f Drs. Smith, Straitb and Del -rr- • • 

Alexander, L -I ^ ^^ ' ^Virginia. 

Alexander, Y. F Maryland. 

• 1 , -o , -D f Drs. Smith, Straith and De ") x^ n v 

Alston, Bennet P - -r, ' V IS. Carolina, 

[ nosset J 

Alston , Willis N . Carolina. 

. J * rj f Drs. Smith, Straith and De } ,1 , , 

Andrews, A. b < r> ^ . >- Wary land. 

Bagley. Paul { ^''- |oslt'. !!'!!! .'!i .^.' } Maryland. ■ 

Baker, N. D Dr. Quigly Virginia. 

Balderston , H Maryland. 

Banks, J. M j^''^' ^^^^^ .'^.t'.'."' '°'^ ^t } -^^■ Carolina. 

Barron, C. H { °'''' St. ^!'.''!.\''°'^ }^- <^"°''°*- 

-r> T WT f I^rs. Smith, Straith and De ") ,, i j 
^^y"^' J- ^ I Rosset j Maryland. 

-r> T , Ttr T f ^^s. Smith, Straith and De ) ^^. . . 
Beckham, T\.L ^^^ , ^ \ irgini 



[ Rosset 



iia. 



Belt, Geo. D Dr. Wells Maryland. 

Berrett, J. G Dr. Stone Maryland. 

Blair, J. L Dr. Doyle Maryland. 

Boardman, F. E Dr. McComas Maryland. 

T» ,, T f I^rs. Smith, Straith and De } ,t 1 j 
Bordley, Jas | Rosset | Maryland. 

-r> . , ^ vtr f I^i's. Butler, MilhoUand and 1 ^^ i j 
Boteler, Geo. W | Latimer j ^W^and. 

Boyd, Philip W University of Virginia Virginia. 

Boyle, C. B Dr. Scott Maryland. 



1? 



NAMES. PRECEnORS. RESIDES'CE. 

Boyle, J. B Dr. Swope Maryland. 

Bradenbaugh, W. T Dr. Coskery ^Maryland. 

Campbell, W. II. II. ...Dr. Campbell Virginia. 

Carpenter, C H Dr. Brown Virginia. 

Chapman, J. K Dr. J. A. Berly S. Carolina. 

nu } T -D CDrs. Smith, Straith and De 1 ,, , , 
^^''^'y^ J- ^ { Rosset. I Maryland. 

Chew, Thos. J Di.st.Columbia. 

Clagett, L. S Drs. Clagettand Walls Maryland. 

n ^ -u T -w ( Drs. Smith, Str.-^ith and De ] ,r , , 

Cockrill, J. M - -r, ' ^Maryland. 

' I Rosset J -^ 

Cookj G. "\V Dr. Dorsey Virginia. 

Cordell, E. F Dr. Cordell W. Virginia. 

Crane, G. H Dr. Robinson Maryland. 

^ r AT f Drs. Butler, MilhoUand and 1 ^. , , 

Crooran, J. M •{ j . ^ Marvland. 

® ' I Latimer j 

Daniel, W. A Dr. L'Enghe Florida. 

Dausch, P Dr. Erich Maryland. 

Davis, E. L Dr. Hall N. Carolina. 

T\ • n TTr f Drs. Smith, Straith and De ] T.r i i 

Davis, Geo. ^Y -l t> ^ . ^Maryland. 

Dawson , R. M Maryland . 

Day, Henry University of Virginia Virginia. 

Dorsey, ^Y. F Dr. Davis Maryland. 

Downey, J. W Dr. Mobberly Maryland. 

Dulaney, J. L Dr. Crane Maryland. 

Early, Wm. N P"-^' Latmo'r^^'"'"""''' ""^ } Maryland. 

Eckenrode, D. M Dr. Baltzell Pennsylvania. 

Eichelberger, C. D Dr. Eichelberger Maryland. 

Eisenhart, Wm. H Dr. Eisenhart Pennsylvania. 

Enfield, Charles Pennsylvania. 

England, F. F { ^''- 1^;^'^' ^''"''J; ;'"' ^' ] Maryland. 

Farmer, J. AV \ """'■ ?"'.'"• MiH.oUand and | ^.^ . 

' I Latimer j ^ 

Faulkner, ^X. ^Y Dr. Spencer Virginia. 

T7- 1, -p a \\T (Drs. Smith, Straith and De ] i-. • • 
Finch, E. S. W I ^^^^^^ j A irginia. 

Frey, R. R , Dr. Frey W. Virginia. 

8 



18 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Garner, H. G | ^''- f''^^"' MilhoHx^d and | Maryland. 

( Latimer j '' 

Gebrman , A . J Maryland . 

n*jj' ^^r ir ^ I^rs. Smith, Straith and De ] ^r- • • 

(biddings, \v. V < T> y Virginia. 

Gilpin, Geo. E Dr. Stonestreet Maryland. 

Gott,R. T {"'''iwt' !'™"'.'".'^..^.'}^I=''y'''°'^- 

Greentree, Winslow Maryland. 

/-, n n f l)rs. Smith, Straith and De ] ^j. . . 
Greenway, G. C | j^^^,^^ | Virgin.a. 

ft . TT T f I^rs. Butler, Milholland and ) ^^ , . 

(jrnmes, rlenry J -l j • \ > Maryland. 

Guyton, B. A Prof. Dunbar Maryland, 

Haefner, G. A, M. D Maryland. 

Hall, J. B Dr. A. S. Hall N. Carolina. 

Hamilton, S. H Dr. McSherry Maryland. 

TT -u -nr A f Drs. Smith, Straith and Del,, , , 
Hamilton, Wm. A ... ^ -n ^ Marylana. 

Harkius, W Dr. Machem Maryland. 

Plarper, C. W Dr. Beckenbaugh Maryland. 

Harrington, J. C Dr. Simmons Maryland. 

Harris, Joseph {^"-^ L^UmJr™!'".^.'".^ } ^^^--^^^^^ 

Hartman, J. H { ^'''- ^.^^^ Straith and De j ^j^^^j^^^ 

Hewitt, Charles Prof. Dunbar Maryland. 

Hoffman, G. H. C Dr. Crum Maryland. 

Hoge, G. D Drs. Plaster and Chamblin.... Virginia, 

Holbrook, E, H Drs, Dashiell and King Maryland, 

■LT n J T n f I^rs. Butler, Milholland and ) ^r i j 
Hollyday, J. G | j^^^.^^^ | Maryland. 

Holt, Thos, S Dr. Holt Maryland. 

Hopkins, H, H Dr. Knight Maryland. 

Horn, L, C Dr. Linthicum Maryland. 

TT i TT7- f Drs. Smith, Straith and De ") ,|- , , 

Houston, Wm j "R «? t ^Maryland. 

Howard, J, McH Dr. E. L. Howard Maryland. 

Hudson, H. S Dr. Hunter Alabama. 

Humphreys, E Dr. Todd Maryland. 

Innes, James Dr. Small - Pennsylvania. 



19 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE, 

Jenkins, C. A Dr. Chaplain Maryland. 

Kerr, Chas. S University of Virginia N. Carolina. 

Kirk, Wm. M Dr. Lewis Virginia. 

Knight, S. T., Jr Dr. Knight Maryland. 

Lauck, Theodore H Dr. Booton Virginia. 

Lawrence, D. H Dr. Lawrence Maryland. 

x. .. T T f Drs. Smith, Straith and De ] ,, , , 
^^gg^"' J- I I Rosset j Maryland. 

Lilly, V. H. B Dr G. B. Aiken Pennsylvania. 

Lurasden, Wra. J Dr. Shannonhouse N, Carolina. 

Manning, H. E. T Dr. Macon N. Carolina. 

Manning, Wm. P Dr. Lippitt Virginia. 

Tvi- -p 1,, (Drs. Smith, Straith and De] i»r -, , 
^^"y'^'-^^"^ I Rosset I Maryland. 

McCormick, C University of Virginia Virginia. 

McDonald, F. Y Drs. Clagett and Walls Maryland. 

McMillan, W. D Dr. Thomas N. Carolina. 

McShane, J. F Dr. Dashiell Maryland. 

McSherry, W. K Dr. McSherry Maryland. 

Miller, C. E Dr. Dwindle Maryland. 

Moncure, J. D University of Virginia Virginia. 

Moorchead, C. C i^'"' ^™;*' ^^'^'^^ ^""^ ^" } Maryland. 

Moorman, J. A { ^''- 1^^^^^' S'™'"^ '""^ ^" } Virginia. 

n-r m -c^ ( Drs. Butler, Milholland and ") -n, . , 

Munroe, Thos. F - -r . ' ^Florida. 

' ( Latimer J 

XT 1 TIT- f Drs, Smith, Straith and De } t>.. , ^ , ,. 

Naylor, Wm -l R« t ^ Dist. Columbia. 

A- 1 -n ^\r T (Drs. Butler, Milholland and "I ^^. . . 
Jvewbill, ^\m. J I j^^^.^^; j\.rgmia 

Newman, J. B University of Virginia Virginia 

Paul, Wm. T Dr, Taft N. Carolina. 

Pembroke, G. W University of Virginia Maryland. 

Pennington, J. J Dr. Fulks Maryland. 

Perkins, Wm. II Dr. Borck Pennsylvania. 

Phillips, Jas. B Dr. Handy. Maryland. 

PinkstoD, C. L JD"- Butt^;;MilhollandaDd j^,^j^^^^^_ 

Pitts, Chas Virginia. 

Powell, S. F., M. D.... University of Maryland, 1861. Maryland. 






20 

NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Price, A. B., M. D University of Maryland, 1867. Maryland. 

Price, J. T Dr. Price Maryland. 

Reiche, P. H Dr. Bordley Maryland. 

-D 1 3 T I, -n^ f I^rs- Van Bibber and Gar- ) t.^ i j 
Reynolds, John E s > Maryland. 

Ridout, Z. Duvall Drs. Ridout and Walton Maryland. 

Russell, Wm. L Dr. Baltzell Maryland. 

Sanders, J. W Dr. Hill N. Carolina. 

Sappington, Thos. P. ...Dr. Sappington Maryland. 

Scott, J. W., M. D University of Maryland, 1866. Maryland. 

Scott, Lee Drs. Clagett and Walls Missouri. 

Shertzer, A. B Dr. Plarlan Maryland. 

Shields, J. W Dr. Thompson Indiana. 

Shipley, L. M Maryland. 

Shipley. W. S {^'''Rotet' ^"''"^ ""l^..'^! } ^^"y'^°''- 

Slingluff, Frank {^'■' lo'^ej ^.'"".'!.'°'^ ^'{Maryland. 

Smith, R. C I Drs. Smith, Straith and De j j^ ^^^^^.^^_ 

I Rosset j 

c, u T rr f I^rs. Smith, Straith and De ] -.i- , , 

btanfebury, J. T -^ j. ' V Maryland. 

Stein, A. E Dr. J. A. Reed Maryland. 

Stephens, Albert Dr. McSherry Maryland. 

Stokes, Jas. H { ^''- ^^^ ^^^^^^]^^^ ^°^__^^ } Maryland. 

Stone, Henry L j^^'' L^amen^.'.'''.^^^^^^^^^^ } ^'"'"'»^- 

Straughn, Fred'k Dr. Kennedy Maryland. 

e T T> f Drs. Butler, Milholland and ^ Tvr , , 

bummers, James P...-^ j ,. > Maryland. 

Swann, C. Dr. McGuire. Virginia. 

o rv n f Drs. Butler, Milholland and ) -yr , , 
S'^^^'^^y- T- C I i^,ji,„;, j Maryland. 

Sweeting, J. K. P Dr. McManus Maryland. 

Thompson, Knox University of Virginia Virginia. 

rri, on f P^rs. Butler, Milholland and ] -.r i , 

Thompson, S. G < j . ' ^Maryland. 

Thomson, P. A University of Virginia Virginia. 

Tiffany, L. McL {^''' w! .!'.'.!!!"!. I'.'!!^.!} ^^"^y^'""'- 



21 



NAMES. PRECEPTORS. RESIDENCE. 

Troupe, Samuel C Dr. 0. J. Smith Maryland. 

Troxell, J. G Dr. Kinzer Maryland. 

Truitt, G. T Dr. Truitt Maryland. 

Wagner, J. E. S Dr. Sappington Maryland. 

Walter, Jas. N Maryland. 

TIT 1 T T> f Drs. Butler, Milholland and ] r. , 

Waples, Jos. 13 < t .• > Delaware. 

^ [ Latimer j 

TTT \T A f Drs. Smith, Straith and De ] ^r. . . 
^^^^^' ^"^^ ^ I Rosset I Virginia, 

Warfield, M. W , M. D. 

,Tr • T T f Drs. Smith, Straith and De ] Tvr i j 
Waring, J. L | j^^^^^^' | Maryland. 

Waring, W. W Dr. Maccubbin Maryland. 

xrr 1? -D f Drs. Butler, Milholland and ] -„ i . 

Warren, h. r ■{ y ^. v rennsylvania. 

( Latimer j •^ 

1-rr T A f Drs. Butler, Milholland and ) -r> i • 

AVarren, L. A \ y . >• Pennsylvania. 

Waters, Franklin^ Jr.... Dr. Waters Maryland. 

Watkins. Wm. C { ^''- ^^^ !'.'""'.'.'!.'"!^"'} Maryland. 

Welty, F. H University Hospital Maryland. 

White, Jos. A J ^''' ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^;^^^^^^^} Maryland. 

Whiteford, H. C Maryland. 

Williams, E Dr. Lynch Maryland. 

Williams, J. B., Jr... { ^''- Hoiset..^'™.'*.'!.""^ ^^ } N- C'^^li'^^- 

Williams, T. C Dr. P. C. Williams Virginia. 

Wilson, Jas. H { '^''' St,.!'."'.'.'!.'"'^ ^H Maryland. 

Yost, P. K Dr. Curry Pennsylvania. 

Zepp, Leonard { ^''- L^tt'e'r^^"''""""^ ""^ } Maryland. 

Zeigler, H. A Dr. Hay Pennsylvania. 



SiaAOIM.TES 



AT THE ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT, HELD MARCH 5th, 1868, THE 

FOLLOWING CANDIDATES RECEIVED THE DEGREE 

OF DOCTOR IN MEDICINE. 

Names. Residence. 

Alexander, L . . j. Virginia. 

Alston, Benxet P; North Carolina. 

Baker, Newton D.i West Virginia. 

Banks, James M North Carolina. 

Barron, Charles H " 

Bayne, John W Maryland. 

Beckham, W. L Virginia. 

Belt, George D Maryland. 

Blair, John L.. " 

BoRDLEY, James V. '•' 

Boteler, George W.w " 

Boyd, Philip AV Virginia. 

Carpenter, George H.* " 

Chesley, James B; Maryland. 

Chew, Thomas J.i " 

Cordell, Eugene F..3 West Virginia. 

Crogan, John M..^ ; Maryland. 

Dausch, Peter..' " 

Day, Henry Virginia. 

DuLANEY, J. Lambert. .>. Maryland. 

Early, William W..- " 

Eckenrode, D. Myers. j Pennsylvania. 

Eichelberger, Charles D.. Maryland. 

Eisenhart, William H.. Pennsylvania. 

England, Frank F Maryland. 



23 

Names. Residence. 

Farmer, John W..r. Virginica. 

Finch, Edward W.i " 

Frey, Robert E. West Virginia. 

GiDDiNGS, William V Virginia, 

GoTT, Richard T.a Maryland. 

Greenway. Gilbert C Virginia. 

Grimes, Henry J. ,-. Maryland. 

Hall, James B..i. North Carolina. 

Hewitt, Charles. / Maryland. 

HoGE, G. Dickson V. Virginia. 

Hollyda y, John G.U Maryland. 

HoLBROOK, Edward H/. " 

Hudson, Herbert S.J, Alabama. ' 

Innes, James. . i Pennsylvania. 

Kerr, Charles S.*. North Carolina. 

Kirk, William M. Virginia. 

Knight, Samuel T., Jr./-. Maryland* 

Lauck, Theodore H. * Virginia. 

McCoRMicK, Cyrus ^- ^ '' 

McSherr-T, Wm. Kilty.^, Maryland. 

Moncure, James D Virginia. 

Moorehead, Charles G Maryland. 

Moorman, J. A. ., Virginia. 

MuNROE, Thomas F.. .' Florida. 

Newbill, William J../,. Virginia. 

Newman, J. Barbour..^.-. '- 

Pembroke, George W..;... Maryland. 

Pinkston, CamIllUs L.;. Alabama. 

Price, Joshua T; ..Maryland. 

Scott, LEE..;-r. Missouri. 

Shields, John W.i .Indiana. 

Shipley, William S./ ■. ....'. Maryland. 

Slingluff, Frank "" 

Smith, E. C...^ North Caroiinai 

Stein, Attila E.;^ Maryland. 

Stokes, James H.. " 

Stone, Henry L Alabama. 



u 

Named. Residence. 

Summers, James P Maryland. 

Sweeney, Timothy C. •' 

Sweeting, James K. P^ " 

Thompson, Knox .• Virginia. 

Thompson, Samuel G J. Maryland. 

Thomson, Pembroke A. .'. '. Virginia. 

Tiffany, Louis McL.., Maryland. 

Troupe, Samuel C..;. 

Waples, Joseph B . , Delaware. 

Ware, N. Anderson. Virginia. 

Warren, Edward P .; Pennsylvania. 

Warren, Lucius A./. " 

Waring, John L.... Maryland . 

Watkins, William C..». " 

Welty, Frank H.; " 

Whiteford, H. Clay.» " 

Williams, J. Buxton, Jr.! North Carolina. 

Williams, T. Clayton Virginia. 

Wilson, James H.> Maryland. 

^ Tost, Peter K. .» Pennsylvania. 

(^ Zepp, Leonard,. V Maryland. 



The Honorary Degree of Doctor in 3£edicine was Conferred upon 

Alexander M, Gibbons, of Ohio. 
Thomas F. Wood, of North Carolina. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The iiext session will begin on Monday, the 19tli of Oo- 
tober, 1867, and close on the 1st of March, 1868. 

There will be a Preliminary Course, beginning on Mon- 
day, October otli. 

The Fees for attendance on Lectures are, for Surgery, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy, Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, Obstetrics, Physiology, and Pathology, 
and Diseases of Women and Children, fifteen dollars each, 
or one hundred and. tioenty dollars for the full course ; Prac- 
tical Anatomy, ten dollars. 

No charge is made for the Clinical ticket. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Hospital as Clinical Assistants. The fee is one hun- 
dred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

SX.A.TTJTES. 

1. Every student attendinii' Lectures must matriculate 
and pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matric- 
ulation and lecture tickets must be taken out at the com- 
mencement of the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, 
and exhibited to the Janitor when required. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
courses of Lectures in this School^ or one in this after one 
in some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a Thesis 
of his own composition on some subject connected with 
medical science, or a clinical report of not less than six 
cases of disease, drawn up from his own observation. Xo 
Thesis will be received after the time specified above, but 
by a special vote of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught in 
this School. He must also produce evidence of attendance, 

4 



26 

during one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical 
Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which is twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer, before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a ma- 
jority of votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the 
candidate may be re-examined, if he desires it; or he may 
decline a second examination, and assume the position of a 
candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations 
on the Lectures during the session, attendance upon which 
is earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a can- 
didate is based upon their knowledge of his general attend- 
ance and industry, character and habits, as well as upon 
the result of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly under- 
stood that while any student who has complied with the 
technical requisitions, viz: matriculation, attendance upon 
Lectures, and the deposit of a Thesis, may appear before 
them for examination, they reserve to themselves, and will 
exercise, the right of making moral as well as intellectual 
qualifications an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded 
as obstacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock 
P. M., Sundmjs excepted. No persons, except Physicians 
and Medical Students, are allowed to visit the rooms, with- 
out special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator 
of Anatomy. 

By vote of the Faculty, 

GEORGE W, MILTENBERGER, Dean. 



Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, who may he found at his house on the 
Unicersily grounds, will conduct gentlemen to comfortahie and convenient 
hoarding houses. The expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any 
city in the country — good hoard heing obtained at about $5 per week. 



xJ 'Jfi^ 



T:EiE 



ff.IIVlBSIf¥ 



COMMONLY KNOWN AS THK 



lAlIlllOSl ilf imiiAm¥< 




Ls constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the UniversitVj and 
nursed by the Sisters of Charity. An addition has recently been 
erected, containing commodious private apartments separate from 
the more public portion of the house. Persons from a distance 
requiring surgical treatment, or operations, will find the Institu- 
tion admirably adapted to this purpose. 

Board from five to ten dollars per week, according to the accom- 
modations required. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. J. S. Conrad, 
Kesident Physician. 



UWITllilf ¥ #1 



SIXTY-SECOND AM 



3A.V 



V 



or Till 



SCHOOL OF 




SESSIOI^* i 



BALT 
PRINTED BY KELLY 

PHILTERS, BOOKSEl 
17 4 B A L T I : 




HlTllSlfT m Ma1¥141P, 



♦ ^♦to" 



SIXTY-SECOND 



^ OJF THE '^ 






SESSIO]^ 1869-'70, 



Ay^n 



Malaguc of :|[atriculab ^ and iradimtefi, 



SESSIOlSr 1868— '69. 



BALTIMORE: 
KELLY, PIET AND COMPANY 

174 BALTIMORE STREET. 



MDCCCLXIX, 



^IS^ ®@@K 



AxATOMY. — Sharpey and Quain ; Gray's Anatomy, Wil- 
son's Anatomy. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Pirrie's Surgery, Ericlisen's 
Surgery, Gross' Surgery, Bernard and Huette's Operative 
Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Turner's Chemistry, Fownes' 
Chemistry, Graham's Chemistry, Brande and Taylor's 
Chemistry, Bowman's Medical Chemistry, Parrish's Prac- 
tical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics. — Cazeaux's, Churchill's, Rigby's Midwifery. 

Principles axd Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lec- 
tures, Flint's Practice, Bennett's Practice, Wood's Practice. 

Materia Medic a and Therapeutics. — U. S. Dispensatory, 
Wood's Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Medica, Garrod's 
Materia Medica, Stille's Materia Medica. 

Physiology and Hygiene. — Todd & Bowman's Physio- 
logical Anatomy, Dalton's Physiology, Flint's Physiology, 
Parke's Hygiene. 

Diseases of Women and Children. — Thomas on Diseases 
of Women ; West on Diseases of Women ; J. Lewis Smith 
on Infancy and Childhood ; West on Diseases of Children. 

Works on Special Subjects — Bumstead on Venereal Dis- 
eases ; Flint on Diseases of Lungs and Heart ; Tobold on 
Diseases of tlie Throat ; Mackenzie on the Laryngoscope ; 
Wells on Diseases of the Eye. 



Uuirersiij of Ifarjlaad. 

Hon. JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL. D., Provost. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D., 
Professor of Clinical Surgery and Surgery of the Skeleton. 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. LL. D., 
Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGEH, M. D., 
Professor of Obstetrics. 

RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D., 
Professor of Princij^les and Practice of Medicine. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D., 
Professor of Principles and Practice of Surgery, i 

SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D., 
Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

FRANK DONALDSON, M. D , 

Professor of Physiology and Hygiene, and Clinical Professor of Diseases of 

the Throat, Lungs and Heart. 

WILLIAM T. HOWARD, M. D, 

Professor of Diseases of Women and Children. 

JULIAN J. CHISOLM, M. D., 

Professor of Operative Surgery, and Clinical Professor of Diseases of Hie. 

Eye and Ear. 

FRANCIS T. MILES, M. D., 
Professor of General, Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy. 

M. J. De ROSSET, M. D, 
Adjunct to the Professor of Physiology. 

J. E. MITCHELL, M. D., 
Adjunct to the Professor of Diseases of Women and Children. 

L. McLANE TIFFANY, M. D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

JULIAN J. CHISOLM, M. D., 

Dean of the I'aculty. 



FOM 1868''G9. 



Eksident Physician J. S. CONRAD, M. D. 

Clinical Clerk E. F. CORDELL, M.^D. 

Dispensary Physician A. E. STEIN, M. D. 

Apothkcaey B. A. GUYTON, M. D. 

Sister SuPERiOK SISTER HILARY. 



f MMIiAl 4SiIil41fVi. 



WILLIS ALSTON, 
J. B. BOYLE, 
G. W. COOK, 
H. G. GARNER, 
B. A. GUYTON, 
J. H. HARTMAN, 



WM. HOUSTON, 
C. A. JENKINS, 

w. D. McMillan, 

J. R. PHILLIPS, 
JOS. A. WHITE, 
E. WILLIAMS. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

®©©1 OF KlBlOIll: 

SESSION 1869-70. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Session of the School of 
Medicine in the University of Maryland will commence on 
Monday, the 4th of October, 1869, and will terminate on 
the last day of February, 1870. 

The Medical Department of the University of Maryland, 
among the oldest and most honored Institutions in America, 
has been for so many years one of the leading Schools of Medi- 
cine, that its alumni are found filling the highest positions 
in most of the States, especially the South and Southwest. 
By their professional standing, they bear record of the care 
which the Faculty has always taken in extending instruc- 
tion to those who have sought a Medical education under 
their supervision. 

Since the close of the Winter Session of 1868-'69, the 
Faculty have been reorganized, and the number of mem- 
bers increased. It is now more fully prepared than 
ever to give a thorough Course of Medical Instruction. 
Among the recent changes in the Faculty attention is 
invited to the creation of a Chair of Clinical Surgery, and 
the transfer to it of Prof. N. R. Smith — and to the estab- 
lishment of the Principles and Practice of Surgery, as a 
distinct department, under the charge of Prof. C. Johnston. 



Among the valued additions lateh' made to the Faculty, 
especial attention is called to the names of Profs. J. J. 
Chisolm and F. T. Miles. These gentlemen will he pleas- 
antly rememhered by the classes who formerly attended the 
Medical College of the State of South Carolina, and by the 
entire corps of army medical officers in Confederate service, 
who acknowledged indebtedness to Prof. Chisolm for his 
'^Manual of Military Surgery." Prof. Miles will instruct 
in Anatomy, and Prof. Chisolm will teach Operative Sur- 
gery. 

The Medical Department of the University of Maryland 
commands all the means and advantages in use at the 
present time for giving a complete Course of Medical 
Instruction, with numerous preparations and elaborate 
diagrams to elucidate all the points pertaining to the many 
branches taught in the College. The Chemical Laboratory 
is one of the finest in the country, and is particularly 
rich in apparatus of great value ; and the Anatomical 
and Pathological Museum, under the charge of an active 
Curator, is being added to continually. 

In the plan of instruction adopted by this Institution, 
Clinical Teaching constitutes a very important feature. 
The great facilities possessed by the Medical Department 
of the University enable the Professors daily to eluci- 
date upon the living subjects, the diseases and accidents 
treated of in the Didactic Lectures. The better to carry out 
this object, the Faculty of the University of Maryland pos- 
sess a General Hospital^ in the wards of which are always 
found cases of great interest. The contiguity of this Hos- 
pital to the College Buildings, the width of the street only 
separating the two Institutions, enables all of the students 
to attend the Clinical Instruction. These Clinics are held 
daily by the Professors of the College, both at the bed- 
side, in the Clinical Amphitheatre and in the Dispensary. 

Students attending the University of Maryland will 
receive Clinical Instruction in Surgery from Prof. K. R. 
Smith, whose great experience and large number of 



surgical cases will make this Department of tlie Course 
peculiarly attractive. Eye and Ear Surgery, with the use 
of the Ophthalmoscope and Otoscope, which liave become 
such prominent and successful fields for labor and rapid 
promotion in professional life, will be practically taught by 
Prof. J. J. Chisolm. Uterine Surgery, or the Surgical Dis- 
eases of Women, another special branch of Surgery of great 
interest, will receive attention both in the Halls of the 
College and the Hospital wards and Amphitheatre from 
Prof. W. T. Howard. It will thus be seen that stu- 
dents who attend the Course of Lectures. in the Univer- 
sity of Maryland will enjoy rare opportunities for surgical 
study. 

The Departments in Medicine are equally well provided 
for. In the wards of the Hospital and Dispensary, as well as 
in the Clinical Amphitheatre, every variety of disease can 
be seen, and es2)ecial attention will be called to their 
symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment by Profs. 
McSherry and Chew. These gentlemen will have charge 
of the medical wards of the Hospital during the Course of 
Lectures, which will enable the student to follow their 
instruction daily at the bedside, and watch the effects of 
treatment, as well as note the many phases which diseases 
assume, and the modifications effected by individual pecu- 
liarities of Constitution. Auscultation and Percussion, 
with the use of the Stethoscope, the Laryngoscope and the 
Khinoscope, all required for correct diagnosis in the study 
of Diseases of the Throat, Lungs and Heart will be 
taught by Prof. F. Donaldson. The Diseases of the 
JSTervous System will be Clinically under the charge of Prof. 
Miles. 

To enable the students to reap the fullest advantage from 
Clinical Teaching, and to supply abundant material, the 
Faculty have organized a General Dispensary, at which 
they daily attend, and where numbers of the poor of the 
city seek Medical and Surgical advice. 

Baltimore, socially one of the most attractive and de- 



10 



lightful cities in America, lias now a population of nearly 
400j000. In it, as in all large cities, the extremes of afflu- 
ence and poverty are found. From its large number of 
working people thousands seek professional aid from the 
many Hospitals, Asylums and Dispensaries established by 
private and public charity. Among the charitable institu- 
tions of the city are : 

The Baltimoi^e Infirmary^ the propert}^ of and under 
the exclusive control of the Faculty of the University of 
Maryland, a General Hospital, complete in all of its ap- 
pointments, in which every provision is made with special 
reference to Clinical Teaching. 

The University Free Dispensary , under the immediate 
control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland, at 
which numbers apply daily for professional treatment, and 
from which much valuable Clinical material is obtained. 

The Bay-View Hospital, a magnificent establishment 
recently erected by the city of Baltimore, is one of the 
largest public Hospitals in America. In the numerous 
wards of this Institution every species of disease is seen. 
This valuable Institution offers special advantages for 
studying diseases at the bedside, inasmuch as a number 
of gentlemen, immediately after their graduation in medi- 
cine, are received in this Hospital as resident students. 
Connected with the establishment are "Lying-in Wards," 
in which the resident students have every facility for 
obtaining individual experience in the practice of Ob- 
stetrics. 

The Baltimore Special Dispensary numbers its patients 
by thousands. Its rooms are daily crowded by those seeking 
professional advice from its energetic and skilled corps of 
medical officers, who extend to students every facility for 
acquiring a proficiency in the study of disease. 

The Southern Dispensary , Eastern Dispensary and Gen- 
eral Dispensary are open daily and visited by numbers of 
sick. 



11 

St. Agnes' Hospital^ an extensive charity under the charge 
of the Sisters of Mercy, is about being largely added to, 
and will form a very important institution for Clinical 
Instruction. 

The Home of the Friendless is an asylum for children 
with several hundred inmates. 

The Union Protestant Infirmary^ among the medical 
staff of which are found some members of the Faculty of 
the University of Maryland. 

The Church Home and Infirmary, a large establish- 
ment under the direction of the Episcopal Church of Bal- 
timore, has as Medical Oflicers members of the Faculty. 

These, the most prominent Hospitals and Asylums, 
exhibit sufficiently the Clinical advantages offered to stu- 
dents who attend the Medical Department of the University 
of Maryland, 

During the Session of the College, students are carefully 
examined by members of the profession, who form Quiz 
Classes. The object of this kind of instruction is to explain 
all points in the regular lectures which students may not 
have clearly grasped. The better to ascertain their pro- 
ficiency, they are individually catechised upon the lectures 
of the day,'^_and their erroneous and defective responses cor- 
rected. This is a very valuable method of instruction, to 
which the attention of students should be prominently 
drawn. 



SUKMIE SlSSI§lf« 

So much attention is now paid by leading medical minds 
in all countries to the development of a better acquaint- 
ance with special diseases, and the literature of each De- 
partment of Medicine is already so voluminous and daily 
increasing, as to preclude the possibility of a thorough 
knowledge by any one physician of all the branches of 



12 



practice. Those who desire proficiency must recojs^nize 
the necessity for a division of labor, and yield to tlie urgent 
demands on the part of the public for superior knowledge 
of certain diseases. Those physicians meet with the most 
rapid success, who, to a general acquaintance with Medi- 
cine, have added the special study of some particular class of 
diseases, in the treatment of whicli they have become so 
skilled, that their claims force themselves upon older pro- 
fessional men. Experience shows, that those who possess 
this special knowledge have an advantage equivalent to 
several years' practice in the attainment of professional 
success. Having an individual experience of the value of 
special studies, some of the Professors of the University of 
Maryland have organized a ^^ Summer School of Specialties j" 
in which, by means of Didactic and Clinical Lectures, recent 
graduates and j^hysicians in practice may attain proficiency 
in the treatment of special classes of diseases. 

The Summer Faculty is composed as follows: 

Prof. Wm. E. a. Aikin, M. D., on Toxicology. 

Prof. C. Johnston, M. D., on the Surgical Diseases of the 
Genito-Urinary Apparatus. 

Prof. F. Donaldson, M. D., on Throat and Chest Diseases. 

Prof. W. T. Howard, M. D., on Uterine Surgery. 

Prof. J. J. Chisolm, M. D., on Ophthalmic and Aural 
Surgery. 

Prof. F. T. Miles, M. D., o?i the Anatomy ^ Physiology and 
Pathology of the Nervous System. 

The Lectures of the Summer Session will commence on 
the third Monday in March, 1870, and continue for ten 
weeks. 

Fee for each of tlie Courses of Lectures, when taken out 
separately, $10. For a general ticket admitting to all the 
Course of Lectures, §50. 

For those who had not previously matriculated at the 
University of Maryland, the fee of §5 will be required. 

Students who have attended two full Courses of Lectures 
ill the University of Maryland, and who are not found qual- 



13 

ified for the Degree of M. D. at the March examinations^ 
can, by attending the Summer School, following the Clini- 
cal Lectures at the University Hospital, and studying three 
months longer, stand an examination before the Faculty of 
the University for the Degree of Doctor in Medicine, at the 
closing of the Summer Session. 

The Demonstrator's Rooms will be kept open during the 
Summer Session, and gentlemen may take advantage of 
this opportunity to renew their acquaintance with Practical 
Anatomy ; or acquire a knowledge of Operative Surgery 
from the Professor of Operative Surgery in the University, 
who will form classes for that purpose. 



The Faculty of the University of Maryland would call 
the attention of physicians to the advantages which they 
possess for the treatment of private patients, including both 
medical and surgical cases. It is well known that patients 
from a distance, who are compelled to live in hotels whilst 
they are being treated, more especially those requiring sur- 
gical operations, are forced to endure many annoying dis- 
comforts, and find the extras which their condition neces- 
sitates very expensive. To meet this constant demand upon 
the part of the patients who desire to consult members of 
the Faculty, they possess a private Infirmary, delightfully 
located, with a corps of skilled nurses, and a resident phy- 
sician of experience in the house. 

The charges for Board and Lodging, including nursing 
and medicines^ are from $12 to $20 per week, depending 
upon the size and character of the chambers selected. In 
this Institution patients have every comfort at about one- 
half the cost of board in hotels. The charges for surgical 
and medical attendance are in accordance with tlic fee table 
of the Baltimore Medical Association. 



14 

Physicians having serious cases, for whom they desire the 
aid of the Professors of the University of Maryland, will 
please bear in mind the many comforts and advantages 
which this Sauitariuin offers, and extend this information 
to their patients. 

The private Infirmary is located at the corner of Green 
and Lombard streets. Those who desire to take advantage 
of this comfortable Asylum should address the Dean of the 
Faculty or t]ie Professor whose services are desired, so 
that proper apartments maybe prepared for their reception. 
Where serious surgical operations are required, including 
all operations upon the uterus, ovariotomy, or operations 
upon the eye, &c., this private Hospital, with its good nurs- 
ing, offers peculiar advantages. 




€(tf<tf0^i« 4f lUitfrkttfitt^^. 



SESSION 1868-69. 



Names. Residence. Preceptors. 

Alston, Willis North Carolina Dr^i. Smith and De Rosset. 

Ambler, J. M Virgima Dr. Ambler. 

Anderson, S. H Maryland Dr. Duvall. 

Bagley, Paul '•' Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

BartoH, B. W Virginia 

Boardman, F. E Maryland 

Boone, Wm.C '•' Dr. McSherry. 

Bowie, H. S '' 

Boyle, C.B " Dr. Swope. 

Boyle, J. B " Dr. Swope. 

Burns, C. W. H " Dr. Russell. 

Campbell, W. H. H Virginia Dr. Campbell. 

Carper, And. J '' 

Chapman, J. K South Carolina .Dr. Berley. 

Cherbonnier, J. H Maryland Dr. Cherbonnier. 

Cockrill, J. M " Dr. Cockrill. 

Cook, G W Virginia Dr. Dorsey. 

Crampton^ L. W Maryland University of Yirginia. 

Crane, G. H " Dr. Butler. 

Crim, W. H Virginia Drs. Bush and Willard. 

Darling, H., M. D Maryland University of Maryland, 18G7. 

Davis, G. W '' Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Dawson, R. M " Drs. McSherry and Butler. 

Doran, Peter..... " Dr. Butler. 

Dorsett, W. C Tennessee Dr. Frierson. 

Dorsey, ^Ym. T Maryland Dr. W. H. Davis. 

Downey, J. W " Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Dunn, Edward H " Dr. Hardin. 

•Eareckson, R. W., M.D. " University of Maryland, 1848. 

Earle, S. T., Jr " Dr. Earle. 

^0 



16 

Names. Residence. Preceptors* 

Eichelberger, J. W Maryland Dr. Eichelberger. 

EUicott, Lindley " Dr. W. H. Davis. 

Englar, J. W. J " Dr. G. H. Brown. 

Fisher, W. F., M. D... Virginia ...University of Virginia, 1868, 

Gale, J H Maryland 

Garner, H. G " Dr. Butler. 

Gehrman, A. J '' Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Gilpin, G. E " Dr. Butler. 

Goodman, B., M. D... Virginia University of Virginia. 

Greentree, \Y'ms\o\v.... Maryland Drs. Butler and Greentree. 

Griffith, W. B '' Dr. H. P. C. Wilson. 

Guyton, B. A " Drs. McSherry and Butler. 

Hamilton, S H " Dr. McSherry. 

Hamilton, Wm. A " Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Hawkins. W " Dr. Machem. 

Harper, C. W " Dr. Beckenbaugh. 

Harrington, J. C " Drs, Smith and De Rosset. 

Harris, Joseph " Dr. Butler. 

Hartman, J. H " Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Haskins, Carter Virginia University of Virginia. 

Hoa, Albert. Maryland 

Hoffman, G. H. C '' Dr. Crum. 

Holt, Thomas S " Dr. Holt. 

Honan, A. W Pennsylvania Dr. Xoel 

Hopkins, H. H Maryland Dr. Knight. 

Horn, L. C " Drs. Butler and Linthicum. 

Houck, H. J '' Dr. Stone. 

Houston, Wm '•' Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Howard, A. W Pennsylvania Dr. Xoel. 

Howard, J. McH Maryland Drs. Howard and Latimer. 

Huffman, F. M D Pennsylvania Jefferson Medical College. 

Jenkins, C. A Maryland Drs. McSherry and Butler.. 

Jennings, M.- D Virginia University of Virginia. 

Johnson, G. G [oica Dr. Calkins. 

Jordan, J W. S ' Dr. C. H. Jones. 

Keirle, C. F Maryland Dr. T. W. Simmons. 

Kessler, A. ~M " Dr. Crum. 

Lawrence, D. H " Dr. Lawrence. 

Ligget, J. J " Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Lilly, V. H. B Pennsylvania Dr. Butler. 

Lumsden, W. J North Carolina Dr. Shannonhouse. 

Manning, H. E. T " Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Manning, Wm. P Virginia Dr. Lippitt. 



^ 



Names. Re£ i ience. 

May, Frederick Manjland Drs. 



Preceptors. 

Smith and Dc llobsel. 



Maynard, C 

McKowan. J. M 

McMillan, W. D 

McSliane, J F 

Miller, C E 

Mobberly, J. B 

Moore, H. CM. D.. 

Naylor, Win. L 

Neale, S. T^ D 

Paul, W. T 

Pennington, J. J .. 

Phillips, J. K 

Hanson, B. B 



" Dr. Simpson. 

.West Virginia Dr. J. P. Carter. 

.North Carolina ])r. Thomas. 

. Manjland Dr. Dasbiell. 

" Dr. Dwindle. 

" Dr. Mofforly. 

.Ohio , University of Vermont. 

District of Colnmbia.Drs. Smith and Dc P.osset. 

.Maryland Drs. McShcrry and Butler. 

.North Carolina Dr. Taft. 

, Maryland Dr. Fulks. 

" Drs. Smith and De Kosset. 

Virginia University of Virginia. 



r 



Reamer, N. & Maryland Dr. N. B. Scott. 

Reiche, R. H " Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Richardson, Gr. A Virginia Drs, Bush and Willard. 

Ridout, Z. D Maryland Drs. Ridout and Walton. 

Robinson, W. L-, M.B.Firginia University of Virginia. 

Rohe, George li Maryland^ Dr. Erich. 

Russell, W, L " Drs. Baltzell and Butler. 

Sappingtoii, T. P "" Dr. Sappington. 

Shertzer, -A. T •" Drs, Smith and De Rosset. 

Shipley, L. M '' 

Spalding, L. H Kentucky Dr. Polin. 

Spalding, S, C Maryland Dr. Turner, 

Speight, R. H North Carolina Dr. G. H. Kines. 

Stansbury, J. T Maryland Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Stansbury, J. W '♦ Dr. Wells. 

Stein, A. E., M.D " University of Maryland, 18G8. 

Stephens, Albert " Dr. McSherry. 

Straughn, Frederick.... '' .'.Dr. Kennedy. 

Talbott, T. M District of Columbia.Br. Peter. , 

Taneyhill, G. L.,M.J).New York Bellevue Hospital. 

Thomas, C. B Maryland Dr. W. H. Johnson. 

Truitt, George T " Dr. Truitt. 

Vandeventer, J Virginia University of Virginia. 

Wagner, J. E. S Maryland. Dr. Sappington. 

Waring, W. W " Drs. Smith and Dc Rosset. 

Waters, F.,Jr '* Dr. Waters. 

Weaver, J. J., Jr " Dr. Weaver. 

White, Jos. A " Drs. Smith and De Rosset. 

Wliitehead, W. H North Carolina Dr. Petman. 



^' 



a 



18 

Names. Residence. Preceptors. 

Wilkins, G. L Maryland Dr. Dwinelle, 

Williams, E •' 

Williamson, W. L Mississippi University of Virginiu. 

Wiltshire, J. G Virginia " " 

Womble, J. G Maryland Dr. Womble. 

AVorthiii^ton, J. M " 

Wright,-C. A " Dr. llagan. 

Ziegler, H. A Pennsylvania Dr. Butler. 



I 




AllAfl 



S€t ths r9lnnual ^omynsnce7ne7it^ held Jlarch sd^ 7S69^ 

the following ^(Eandidat&s received the ^e= 

gree of doctor in Jledicine. 

Names. Residence. 

Alston, Willis/. :', North Carolina. 

BoAEDMAN, Francis E.... Maryland. 

Boyle, Charles B Maryland. 

Boyle, J. Brooke, Jr.! Maryland. 

Campbell, Wm. H. H. Virginia. 

Chapman, James K.V;: South Carolina. 

Cook, George W.». <-:; Virginia. 

Crampton, Louis W., Maryland. 

Crane, George H/ MaryHnd. 

Davis, George W^.\ Maryland. 

Dawson, Robert M.^. Maryland. 

Downey, Jesse W a Maryland. 

Dunn, Edward II j. Maryland. 

Garner, Henry Gi Maryland. 

Gehrman, Albert J.:, Maryland. 

Guyton, B. Augustus \ Maryland. 

Hamilton, Wm. A..i... Maryland. 

Hamilton, Samuel H.p-r Maryland. 

Harper, Charles W;,-r. Maryland. 

Harrington, John C.k Maryland. 

Harris, Joseph. ^r. Maryland. 

Hartman, Jacod H>-. Maryland. 

Haskins, Carter. p. Maryland. 

Hoffman, George H. C.k Maryland. 

Holt, Thomas S.K^ Maryland. 

Hopkins^ Howard H.k. Maryland. 

Horn, Louis C.^ Maryland. 

Howard, James McHenry^ Maryland. 

Jekkins, Charles A . .;< Maryland. 



20 

Johnson, George 0..i Iowa. 

Lawrence, Daniel Hi Maryland. 

Ltgget, John J.j Maryland.- 

Lilly, Yirgil H. B.i Pennsylvania*. 

Lumsden, William Jj.. North Carolina. 

Manning, Henry E. T... North Carolina. 

Manning, William P.i Virginia. 

May, Frederick.; Maryland. 

McMillan, William D.1 North Carolina. 

Miller, C. Edward.I. Maryland. 

MooRE, Harrison C..4-. Illinois. 

Naylor, William L.. Dist. Columbia. 

Paul, William T.; North Carolina.- 

Pennington, John J.j' Maryland. 

Phillips, James B,.j Maryland. 

Ranson, Briscoe B... .Virginia. 

Eeiche, Peter Henry.; Maryland. 

RiDOUT, Z. DuvALL..:. Maryland. 

Russell, William La.' Maryland. 

Sappington, Thomas P/. Maryland. 

Shertzkr, Aeram Trego;. Maryland. 

Shipley, Luke M,: Indiana. 

Spalding, Leonard. J. Kentucky.. 

Stephens, Albert Maryland. 

Thoma.s,'C. Byron.. .,.. Maryland. 

Truitt, George T Maryland. 

Vandeventer, Joseph i .^.Virginia. 

Wagner. John E. S..i , ^Maryland. 

Waring, William W.-^. ..Maryland . 

Waters, Franklin, Jr.* Maryland. 

White, Joseph A... , ^Maryland. 

Williams, Elijah. i Maryland'. 

Williamson, William L Mississippiu 

Wiltshire, J ames G . .w Vi rginia». 




FEES, STATUTES, &c. 



The next Session will begin on Monday, the 4th of Octo- 
ber, 1869, and will close on the last day of February, 18Y0. 

The Fees for attendance on the complete Course of Lec- 
tures will be $125. 

Tickets for one or any number of the Departments may 
be taken out separately. 

Practical Anatomy, - - - - |10.00 
Matriculation Fee - _ - - 5. 00 

Graduation Fee 2,0.00 

No extra charge will be made for the Clinical ticket. 

Kecent graduates of other schools, who have not had 
three years experience in the practice of medicine^ can fol- 
low the Course of Lectures of the Winter Session by paying 
half fees to the Faculty, and paying for matriculation. If 
they desire to be examined for the Diploma of the Univer- 
sity the graduation fee will be required also. Practitioners 
of three years standing can attend the Course of Lectures 
by matriculating only. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside 
in the Hospital building as Clinical Assistants. The fee is 
one hundred dollars per year, payable in advance. 

1. Every student attending Lectures, must matriculate 
and pay the regular f6e_, which is five dollars. The matric- 
ulation and lecture tickets must be taken out at the com- 
mencement of the session. 

2. Tlie matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Proi'essors upon whose Lectures the student may attend, 
and exhibited to the Janitor wlien required. 



22 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two 
Courses of Lectures in this School, or one in this after one 
in some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a Thesis 
of his own composition on some subject connected with 
medical science, or a clinical report of not less than six 
cases of disease, drawn up from his own observation. No 
Thesis will be received after the time specified above, but 
by a special vote of the Faculty, 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for 
examination on the various branches of Medicine taught in 
this School. He must also produce evidence of attendance, 
during one session, on Practical Anatomy and Clinical 
Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which ip twenty dollars, must be 
deposited with the Treasurer before the candidate can be 
admitted to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a 
majority of votes. Siiould the Faculty be equally divided, 
the candidate may be re-examined, if he desires it ; or he 
may decline a second examination, and assume the position 
of a candidate in whose case no decision has been made. 
After following the Summer Course of Lectures he may 
again apply for an examination on the 1st of June, at 
which time the Faculty will hold an examination for the 
Degree of M. D. for all such as have fulfilled the require- 
ments of the Faculty. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations 
on the Lectures during the sessioa, attendance upon which 
is earnestly recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a can- 
didate is based upon their knowledge of his general attend- 
ance and industry, character and habits, as well as upon 
the result of his final examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student who has complied with the technical 



requisitions, viz: matriculation^ attendance upon Lectures, 
and the deposit of a Thesis, may a])pear before them for 
examination, tliey reserve to themselves and will exercise 
the right of making moral as well as intellectual qualifica- 
tions an element of their decision. 

Ojien irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and 
prolonged absence from Lectures, will always be regarded 
as obstacles to obtaining a degree 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily until 10 o'clock 
P. M,, Sundmjs excepted. No persons except Physicians 
and Medical Students are allow^ed to visit the rooms witli- 
out special permission from the Professor or Demonstrator 
of Anatomy. 

For further inlbrmation apply to 

J. J. CHISOLM, M. D., 

Dean of the J^\iculti/. 



^^^ Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, who mai/ be found at his house 
on the University grounds, loill conduct gentlemen to comfortable and, 
convenient hoarding houses. The expenses of living are as low in 
Baltimore as in any city in the country — board being obtained as 
low as $4 per lueek. 




/ 



TXaiEI 



llITlEilf 1 lOiPIfAIi 



COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE 



lAlf IMOEl INf nil Al-¥ 



? 




Is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The 
patients are attended by the Faculty of the University, and nursed 
by the Sisters of Charity. A portion of the building contains com- 
modious private apartments separate from the more public portion 
of the house. Persons from a distance requiring surgical treat- 
ment, or operations, will find the Institution admirably adapted to 
this purpose. 

Board in public wards including medical attendance, medicines 
and TinT&'mgjJive dollars per week. 

Applications for admission may be made to Dr. J. S. Conrad, 
Resident Phvsician. 



SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



SCHOOL OF xMEDICINE, 




N. E. cor. Lombard and Green Sts*, Baltimore, Md. 

sEissionsr 1870-71 



BALTIMORE: 
PRINTED BY KELLY, PIET AND COMPANY, 

PRjyTERS, BOOKSELLERS AND STA TIOyERS, 
174 BALTIMORE STREET. 

AIDCCCLXX. 



THE MRYLANO FREE DiSPEHSIRY, 

S. W. COE. GSEEN AND LOMBARD STEEETS, 

Establislied by and under the immediate control of tlie Professors of 
the ITniyersitt of Maryland. 



Open Every Day at 121 o-cloeh, JP. M,, {Sundays Ex- 

cex*ted,) for the 

Irwtmcnt of mr^ Iiiml of ^ium or ^tdknl 



To the Poor, Medical Jtleodaoce aod Medicines 

TREE OF CHARGE. 

The Professors of the University are present every day to treat 
such sick persons as present themselves. Poor women will be at- 
tended to at their homes during tlieir confinements, by the Dispen- 
sary Physicians, free of charge, if application be made at the Dis- 
pensary. 

SuRGEOX IX Chahge— Peof. C. JOHNSTON, M. D. 



Physicians in Chaege— Prof. K. McSHERKY, M. D., and 



Prof. S. C. CHEW, M. D. 



For Chest and Throat Afcd hns— Frof. Y. DONALDSON, M. D 



For Diseases of Women andCh^ldren—FROl\^y. T. HOWARD, M.D. 



For Diseases of the Xerrous Si/sf<'m — Prof. F. T. MILES, M. D. 



Dispensary Physicians, | ^'^^ ^' STEIN, M. D., 

' { E. F. WALKER, M. D. 



HITllilff ®I MaMT: 



SIXTY-THIBD 



V 



^ 



^X^h^ CJi^^^^ 



OF THE 



4 



^ 



%, 









SEIS3ICD]Nt IS^O-'^Zl^ 



AND 



i 



Mn%m 0f jpirkukieg mi m'^imU^, 



SESSIOlSr 18S9— 'T'O- 



^Ui It i nt r c : 

KELLT, PIET AND COMPANY 
]7i Baltimore Street. 



MDCCCLXX 



ifaiTersitj of illarylaad, 

Hon. JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, LL.D., Provost, 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC- 

WILLIAM E. A. AIKIX, M. D. LL. D., 
Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

GEORGE AV. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics. 

RICHARD McSHBRRY, M.D., 
Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D., 
Professor of Surgery. 

SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D., 
Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

FRANK DONALDSON, M. D., 

Professor of Physiology and Hygiene^ 

and 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat, Lungs and Heart. 

WILLIAM T. HOWARD, M. D., 
Professor of Diseases of Women and Children. 

JULIAN J. CHISOLM, M.D., 

Professor of Operative Surgery, 

and 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

FRANCIS T. MILES, M.D , 

Professor of Anatomy , 

and 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System. 

L. McLANE TIFFANY, M. D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

JOHN N. MONMONIER, M. D., 

Prosector to the Professor of Anatomy. 

JULIAN J. CHISOLM, M. D., 
Dean of the Faculty. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 




The Sixty-Third Annual Session of the School of Medicine in the 
University of jNIaryland will commence on Monday, the 3d of Octo- 
ber, 1870, and will terminate on the last day of February, 1871. 

The Medical Department of the University of Maryland commands 
all the means and appliances in use at the present time for giving a 
complete Course of Medical Instruction, with numerous preparations 
and elaborate diagrams to elucidate all the points pertaining to 
the many branches taught in the College. The Chemical Laboratory 
is one of the finest in the country, and is particularly rich in 
apparatus of great value. The Anatomical and Pathological Museum, 
under the charge of an active Curator, is being added to continually. 

In the plan of instruction adopted by this Institution, Clinical 
Teaching constitutes a very important feature. The great facilities 
possessed by the Medical Department of the University enable the 
Professors daily to elucidate upon the living subjects, the diseases 
and accidents treated of in the Didactic Lectures. The Faculty of 
the University of Maryland possesses a large General Hospital, in the 
wards of which are always found cases of great interest. The 
contiguity of this Hospital to the College Buildings, the width of the 
street only separating the two Institutions, enables all of the students 
to attend the Clinical Instruction without loss of time incurred in 
visiting distant hospitals. These Clinics are held daily by the 
Professors of the College, both at the bedside, in the Clinical 
Amphitheatre, and in the Dispensary. 

Students attending the University of Maryland will receive 
Clinical Instruction in Surgery from Prof. C. Johnston. Eye and 
Ear Surgery, with the use of the Ophthalmoscope and Otoscope, 
which have become such prominent and successful fields for labor and 
rapid promotion in professional life, will be practically taught by 
Prof. J. J. Chisolm. Uterine Surgery, or the Surgical Diseases 
of Women, another special branch of Surgery of great interest, will 
receive attention both in the Halls of the College and the Hospital 
wards and Amphitheatre from Prof. W. T. Howard. It will thus be 
seen that students who attend the Course of Lectures in the Univer- 
sity of Maryland will enjoy rare opportunities for surgical study. 



The Departments in Medicine are equally well provided for. In 
the wards of the Hospital and Dispensary, as well as in the Clinical 
Amphitheatre, every variety of disease can be seen, and especial 
attention will be called to their symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis and 
treatment by Profs. McSherry and Chew. Q'hese gentlemen will 
have charge of the medical wards of the Hospital during the Course 
of Lectures, which will enable the student to follow their instruction 
daily at the bedside, and watch the effects of treatment, as well 
as note the many phases which diseases assume, and the modifications 
effected by individual peculiarities of constitution. Auscultation 
and Percussion, with the use of the Stethoscope, the Laryngoscope 
and the Rhinoscope, all required for correct diagnosis in the study of 
Diseases of the Throat, Lungs and Heart, will be taught by Prof. F. 
Donaldson. The Diseases of the Nervous System will be Clinically 
under the charge of Prof. Miles. 

Baltimore, socially one of the most attractive and delightful cities 
in America, has now a population of nearly 400,000. In it, as in 
all large cities, the extremes of affluence and poverty are found. 
From its large number of working people thousands seek professional 
aid from the many Hospitals, Asylums and Dispensaries established 
by private and public charity. Among the charitable institutions of 
the city are : 

The Baltimore Infirmary, the property of and under the exclusive 
control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland, a large General 
Hospital, complete in all its appointments, in which every provision 
is made with special reference to Clinical Teaching. In this building 
is an operating Amphitheatre, easy of access from the wards: in 
this theatre the Clinical Lectures are delivered. 

Thu Maryland Free Dispensary, under the immediate and sole 
control of the Faculty of the University of j\Iurylaiid, at which 
numbers apply daily for professional treatment, and from which 
much valuable Clinical material is obtained. For the purposes of 
this Dispensary the Infirmary building is used so that interesting 
cases can be transferred to the Amphitheatre for Clinical instruction. 

The Baltimore Eye and Ear Infirmary, established by the Faculty 
of the University of Maryland. There is a Free Dispensary con- 
nected with this Institution which attracts a large number of patients. 
Students of the University will have every facility offered them for 
studying all the diseases incident to the eye and ear, and will have 
frequent opportunitiesfor witnessing the various operations performed 
upon these important organs for the restoration of sight and hearing. 

The Bay-Vieio Hospital, a magnificent establishment recently 
erected by the city of Baltimore, is one of the largest public 
Hospitals in America. In the numerous wards of this Institution 
every species of disease is seen. This valuable Institution offers 
special advantages for studying diseases at the bedside. A number 
of gentlemen, immediately after their graduation in medicine from 
the University, are received in this Hospital as resident students. 



Connected with the establishment are " Lying-in Wards," in which 
the resident students have every facility for obtaining individual ex- 
perience in the practice of Obstetrics. 

Besides these large and most convenient fields for Clinical Instruc- 
tion, there are the Baltimore Special Dispensary, numbering its 
patients by thousands ; the Southern Dispensary , Eastern DispeU' 
sary and General Dispensary, open daily and visited by numbers of 
sick ; St. Agnes* Hospital, an extensive charity under the charge of 
the Sisters of Mercy; the Home of the Friendless, an asylum for 
children, with several hundred inmates; the Union Protestant 
Infirmary, the Church Home Infirmary, &c., &c. 

These, the most prominent Hospitals and Asylums of Baltimore, 
exhibit sufficiently the Clinical advantages offered to students who 
attend the Medical Department of the University of Maryland. 



During the year, and more especially during the Session of the 
College, Clinical Lectures will be delivered daily (Sundays excepted) 
at 1 o'clock : 

Monday — Surgical CliniC; by rrof. Johnston. 

Tuesday — Medical Clinic, by Profs. McSherry and Chew. 

Wednesday — Throat and Chest Clinic, by Prof. Donaldson. 

Thursday — Clinic on Diseases of the Nervous System, by Prof. 
Miles. 

Friday — Clinic on Eye and Ear diseases, by Prof. Chisolm. 

Saturday — Clinic on Disease of Women and Children, by Prof. 

Howard. 

During the Session of the College, students are carefully examined 
by members of the profession, who form Quiz Classes. The object 
of this kind of instruction is to explain all points in the regular 
lectures which students may not have clearly grasped. The 
better to ascertain their proficiency, they are individually cate- 
chised upon the lectures of the day, and their erroneous and 
defective responses corrected. This is a very valuable method of 
instruction, to which the attention of students should be prominently 
drawn. 



Extracts from Report of tlie Dean to tlie Regents of tlie M\wi\% 

" The University of Maryland is a Southern Institution depending 
for patronage principally upon the South, a section still overshadowed 



6 

by financial and political depression. Therefore, although the 
Medical Classes following the University are large, we cannot 
expect to attain the numbers which New York and Philadelphia draw 
from the North and Northwest, rich and prosperous sections." 

*' The future of the University of Maryland is intimately con- 
nected with the future of the great Southern country. "With the 
recuperation of this section, will our institutions of learning be more 
numerously attended, and the day is not distant when Baltimore 
will become the centre of Medical Instruction. Baltimore, now 
the third city of the United States, has nearly doubled its population 
since the termination of the war, having grown more rapidly than 
any other large city through the thousands of Southern refugees, 
who have found a hearty welcome in Maryland. These new and 
numerous citizens will never give up their Southern connections." 

" All the members of the Faculty of the University belong to 
Maryland, Virginia, North and South Carolina, and among them 
are found names familiar to every Surgeon in the Confederate 
Army. Their Medical School is thoroughly organized, possessing 
every appliance for successfully teaching all the many branches 
of 3Iedical Science. At one time, during the general prosper- 
ity of the whole country, a class of between three and four 
hundred students attended its sessions. AVith the recuperation of the 
Southern States, Southern students will again flock to its halls, and 
Baltimore, the Southern Metropolis, the mercantile centre, will also 
become the centre of Medical Education for tbe Southern States." 



Bmult^num iQT pplTat© Patients. 

The Faculty of the University of Maryland would call the attention 
of physicians to the advantages which they possess for the treatment 
of private patients, at their private Infirmary, which is delightfully 
located, and where there is a corps of skilled nurses, also a resident 
physician of experience in the house. It is well known that patients 
irom a distance, who are compelled to live in hotels whilst they are 
being treated, more especially those requiring surgical operations, 
are forced to endure many annoying discomforts, and find the extras 
which their condition necessitates very expensive. Where serious 
surgical operations are required, this private Hospital, with its good 
nursing, offers peculiar advantages. 

The charges for Board and Lodging, including nursing and 
medicines, are from $7 to §20 per week, depending upon the size 
and character of the chambers selected. In this Institution patients 
have every comfort at about one-half the cost of board in hotels. The 
charges for surgical and medical attendance are in accordance with 
the fee table of the Baltimore Medical Association. 

For further information apply to 

J. J. CHISOLM, M.D., Dean of FacuUy. 



Catalog' 



^ a^SL 



SESSIOjST 1869— 'TO. 



Name, Residence. Trcceptors. 

Ambler, J. M Virginia Profs. Cliisolm, Miles and De Rosset 

Anderson, S. H Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset 

Bagley, Paul iharylmd 

Baldwin, C. A Maryland Dr. A. S. Baldwin. 

Ballard, Jr., W. R England. 

Baltzell, F. E Maryland Dr. W. H. Baltzell. 

Barton, B. M Virginia Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset 

Barroll, W. V Maryland Prof F. Donaldson. 

Berkley, R. B., M.D Virginia 

Bevan, C. F Maryland Prof. N. R. Smith. 

Boone, W. C Virginia Prof. R. McSherry. 

Bowie, G. F Virginia 

Bowie, H. S Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Bromwell, J. R Maryland Dr. Bromwell. 

Cherbonnier, J. H Delaware Profs. Cliisolm, Miles and De Rosset 

Cockrill, J. M Maryland Dr. J. J. Cockrill. 

Crim, W. H Virginia Dr*. Bush. 

Dawson, J. S '. Maryland Dr. G. L. Hicks. 

Dorsey, W. T Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Duke, A. C South Carolim.lDr. A S. Salley. 

Earle, S. T 3Iaryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset, 

Eichelberger, E. C Virginia Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar. 

Eichelberger, J. W Maryland Dr. J. W. Eichelberger. 

Ellicott, L Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Englar, J. W. G Maryland Drs. J. H. and E. L. Brown. 

Farrell, J. D. D Marylajid Dr. Maddox. 

Ferebee, N.M North Carolina.Br. F. N. Muller. 

Garner, H. G., M.D Maryland 

Gilpin, G. E Maryland Dr. E. E. Stonestreet. 

Green, G. F Georgia Dr. T. A. Simmons. 

Gregg, H. W Virginia Dr. \V. J. Luck. 

Griffith, W. B Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Gross, H. B Maryland Dr G. W. Crura. 

Harkins, J. W Maryland Dr. R. Mechim. 

Barker, J. F Maryland Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar. 

Harris, J. W Virginia University of Virginia. 

Hazard, A, W Pennsylvania ...Dr. A. Noel. 

Hill, Jno. S Alabama Dr. F. H. Anderson. 

Houck, H. J Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Houston, Wm Maryland Dr. B.F.Houston. 

Hults, R.M Jfaryland Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar. 

Jay, J. G Maryland Dr. J. Evans. 

Johnson, J. A.... Maryland Dr. Thomas. 

Johnston, J. M., VLS)... Mary land University of Pennsylvania. 

Jones, J. N Georgia Dr. R. C.Bryan. 

Jones, P.... Morylajid 

Jones, T. M Virginia Profs. Chisolm, Miles andDe Rosset. 

Jordan, J. W. S Maryland Dr. C H. Jones. 

Keerl, C. F Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset 

Keller, B. T Maryland Dr. B. A. Dougherty. 

Kemp, W F. A 51aryland Dr. Wm M. Kemp. 

Kessler, A. M Maryland Dr. J. W. Crum. 

Knight, S. T., M.D Maryland 

Krise, C Pennsylvania. ...Dr. J. W. C. O'Neal. 



8 

Xante, Residence. Preceptors. 

CLish, A. R. J Maryland Dr. J. K. W. Dunbar. 

IViassey, J. E ..South Carolina.Dxs. Bratton, Barrow and Allison. 

Masson, W. H Maryland 

Maynard, C Maryland Profs. Cliisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

McCormick, C. A Maryland Dr. J. N. Monmonier. 

McDowell, E T Maryland Dr. O. S. Mahon. 

McHenry, M. J Arkansas N. O. Medical School. 

McKown, J. M Virginia Profs. Cliisolm, Miles andDe Rosset. 

McShane, J F Maryland Dr. N. L Dashiell. 

McSherry, H.C Maryland Prof. E McSherry. 

Mobberly, J. B Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles andDe Rosset. 

Neale, 8. L. D Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Norris, \V. W Marylatid Prof. F. Donaldson. 

'O'Neal, W. H Pennsylvania. . Dr. J. W. C O'Neal. 

Pape, G, W Maryland Profs. Chisolm and Miles. 

Parvis, W. W Delaware Dr. F. K. Travers. 

Peed, J.S Maryland Dr. J. M Stevenson. 

Pitts, C Virginia Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Reamer, N. G Maryland Profs Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Rehberger, J. H Maryland Profs. Chisolm and Miles. 

Reinhart, D. J Maryland Dr. J. N. Wood. 

Renner, W. H Maryland Dr. Jas. K. Waters. 

Rohe, G. H Maryland Dr. A. F. Erich. 

Schock, J. L Virginia Dr. J. R. W. Dunbar. 

Shipley, D. McG Maryland Dr. E. M Reid. 

Shertzer, A. L., M.T).... Mary land 

Shoemaker, E.B.S.jM.D.iforyZanc? 

Skinner, W. T Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Spanlding, S. C Maryland Prof. R. McSherry. 

Speight, R. H North Carolina Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Spiller, J. S Virginia 

Stansbury, J. T Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Stansbury, J. W Maryland Dr. T. Wells. 

Streett, C. H Maryland Dr S Baldwin. 

Straughn. F Maryland Profs Chisolm, Miles andDe Rosset. 

Talbott, T. M Dist. Colwmbia.Frofs. Chisolm, Miles andDe Rosset. 

T-iylor, J. Z Maryland Dr. W. H. Dashiell. 

*l"aylor, M Maryland Dr. J. M. De Rosset. 

•I'eackle, St. Geo. W Maryland Prof. N. R. Smith. 

Tinges, A. S Maryland Prof. F. Donaldson. 

Tongue, H Maryland Dr. N. D. Chesney. 

Van Bibber, J. B Maryland Dr. Wm. C. Van Bibber. 

Walker, H South Carolina..Y)v. T. P. Bailey. 

Waller, W. J. C Virginia Dr. N. S. Waller. 

Winterson, C. R Maryland Dr. W. Bird. 

Ward, M. T Ohio Dr T. C. Rogers. 

Ware, H. F Maryland Dr. Dunbar. 

Waters, C. H Maryland 

Wayson, W. N. A, Ma yland 

Weaver, Jr., J T Maryland Dr. J. F. Weaver. 

Whitehead, W H North Carolina.Vxoi^ Chisolm, Miles andDe Rosset. 

White, F. J., M. D Marxjland 

White, W. W Maryland Profe. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Wiley, W. W Maryland Dr. J. H. Robertson. 

Wilkins, G L Maryland Dr. Dwinelle. 

Wightt, J. T Alabama 

Womble, J. G Maryland Dr. P. M. Womble. 

Wright, C. A Marylatid Profs. Chisolm, Miles and Do Rosset. 

Tingling, W. A Maryland Dr. J G. Keller. 

Zeigler, H. A Pennsylvania.. .Dr. J. Hay. 



S3aj.DWl.TESc 



•S€t the S4nnual 'Womnience'ment^ held Jlarch 7 si, rs'ro^ 

the following Candidates received the We= 

gree of Woctor in Medicine. 

Name. Residence. 

Ambler, James M. .•'.'. Virr/irva. 

Anderson, Samuel H^ Maryland. 

Barton, Boiling W , Vrgiriia. 

Bowie, H. Strafford w. Maryland. 

Cherbounier, Joseph H^ Maryland. 

Crim, William Henry .1, Virginia. 

Dorsey, Wm. Tagart.*. Maryland. 

Earle, Samuel T^ Maryland. 

Eichelberger, James W.x'. / Maryland. 

Ellicott, Lindley.*^; Maryland. 

Englar, James W. J.». Maryland. 

Griffith, William B ^. Maryland. 

Harris, John W Virginia. 

Houck, Henry John^, Maryland. 

Howard, Alexander W^ Pennsylvania. 

Jones, T. Marshall.. Virginia. 

Keerl, Charles F Maryland. 

Kessler, Albert M.,^ Maryland. 

Maynard, Clinton. ♦, Maryland. 

McDowell, Eugene T..K'. Maryland. 

McHenry, Martin J.v. Arkansas. 

McKown, John M.v. Virginia. 

McShane, James F.;, Maryland. 

Mobberley, J. Bradley.; Maryland. 

Neale, Stephen L. D Maryland. 

Pitts, Charles..;^'. Virginia. 

Reamer, Norman G.* Maryland. 

Schoch, J. L..!. Virginia. 

Skinner, William T.i Maryland. 

Spalding, Stephen C.i Maryland. 

Speight, Richard H North Carolina. 

Spiller, James S.i Virginia. 

Stansbury, John T.; , Maryland. 

Stansbury, John W.i Maryland. 

Straughn, Frederick.* 3Iaryland. 

Talbott, T. Melville.:, District of Columbia. 

Teackle, Jr., St. George W.^ Mari^laTid. 

Waller, W. J. C- Virginia. 

Weaver, Jr., Jacob J.» Maryland. 

White, Walter W.> Maryland. 

Whitehead, William Henry., Nrth Carolina. 

Wilkins, G. Lawson.**... Maryland. 

Wright, Charles A....... Maryland. 

Zeigler, Henry A..* Pennsylvania. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c 



The next Session will begin on Monday, the 3d of October, 1870, 
and will close on the last day of February, 1871. 

Tickets for one or any number of the Departments may be taken 
out separately. 

The Fees for attendance on the complete Course of Lectures will 
be $120. 

Practical Anatomy, - - - - $10.00 
Matriculation Fee, . . - . 5.00 

Graduation Fee, - . - . 20.00 

No extra charge will be made for the Clinical ticket. 

In accordance with action of the Legislature, one beneficiary stu- 
dent will be received from each Senatorial District of the State. 

Application for these scholarships must be made to the respective 
Senators of the various Districts of the State of Maryland. 

State Beneficiaries will be charged Matriculation, Practical Anat- 
omy and Graduation Fees only. 

STATUTES. 

1. Every student attending Lectures, must matriculate and pay 
the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation and 
lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement of the 
session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the Pro- 
fessors upon whose Lectures the students may attend, and exhibited 
to the Janitor when reijuired. 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two full Courses 
of Lectures in this School, or one in this after one in some other 
respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the Faculty, on 
or before the 14th day of February, a Thesis of his own composition 
on some subject connected with medical science, or a clinical report 
of not less than six cases of disease, drawn up from his own 
observation. No Thesis will be received after the time specified 
above, but by a special vote of the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for examina- 
tion on the various branches of Medicine taught in this School. He 
must also produce evidence of attendance, during one session, on 
Practical Anatomy and Clinical Medicine. 



11 

6. The graduation fee, whicli is twenty dollars, must be deposited 
with the Treasurer before the candidate can be admitted to 
examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a majority of 
votes. Should the Faculty be equally divided, the candidate may be 
re-examined, if he desires it ; or he may decline a second examina- 
tion, and assume the position of a candidate in whose case no decision 
has been made. 

8. The several Professors will hold public examinations on the 
Lectures during the session, attendence upon which is earnestly 
recommended. 

The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate is 
based upon their knowledge of his general attendance and industry, 
character and habits, as well as upon the result of his final 
examination. 

The Faculty, therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood that 
while any student who has complied with the technical requisitions, 
viz : matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, and the deposit of a 
Thesis, may appear before them for examination, they reserve to 
themselves and will exercise the right of making moral as well 
as intellectual qualifications an element of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and prolonged 
absence from Lectures, will always be regarded as obstacles to 
obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily, Sundays excepted. 

A limited number of students will be permitted to reside in 
the Hospital building as Clinical Assistants. The fee is one hundred 
dollars per year, payable in advance. 

For further information apply to 

J. J. CHISOLM, 

Dean of the Faculty, 

Residence, 64 Franklin street, Bxltinxore, Md. 



J^" Mr. Peter Smith, the Janitor, who may he found at his house 
on the University grounds, will furnish gentlemen with a list of 
comfortable and convenient hoarding houses. The expenses of living 
are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the United States — hoard 
being obtained as low as $4 per iceek. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



Anatomy. — Sharpey and Qiiain ; Gray's Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy. 

Surgery. — Druitt's Surgery, Erichsen's Surgery. 

Chemistry and Pharmacy. — Fownes' Chemistry, Bloxam's Chemistry, 
Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics. — Cazeaux's, Churchill's, Bedford's Midwifery. 

Principles and Practice of Medicine. — Watson's Lectures, Flint's 
Practice, Xiemeyer's Practice, 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — U. S. Dispensatory, Wood's 
Therapeutics, Pereira's Materia Medica. 

Physiology and Hygiene. — Todd & Bowman's Physiological Anatomy, 
Dalton's Physiology, Flint's Physiology. 

DiSE.ASES op Women and Children. — Thomas on Diseases of Women; 
J. Lewis Smith on Diseases of Infancy and Childhood. 

Works on Special Subjects. — Bumstead on Venereal Diseases ; Flint 
on Diseases of Lungs and Heart ; Tobold on Diseases of the Throat ; Mac- 
kenzie on the Laryngoscope ; Wells on Diseases of the Eye : Troeltsch on 
the Di8ea.ses of the Ear. 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 

(IISrir«x:E=L]VE.^:E=L -Y,) 

FOR 18 6 9—' 7 O . 

lUiideni Physician J. S. CONEAD, M. D. 

ClinicaJ Clerk S. T. KNIGHT, M. D. 

Dispensary Physidan.... \ ^' ^' ^TEIN, M. D. 

^ • ^ J E. F. WALKER, M.D. 

SuUr Superior SISTER HILARY. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 

S. H. ANDERSON, H. J. HOUCK, 

B. W. BARTON, S. H. MOBBERLEY, 

H. S. BOWIE, CH. PITTS, 

W. H. CRIM, R. H. SPEIGHT, 

\V. T. DORSEY, T. M. TALBOTT, 

W. B. GRIFFITH. W. H. WHITEHEAD. 



THE PRACTITIONER. 

A Monthly Journal of Therapeutics, 

EDITED BY FRANCIS E. ANSTIE, M. D., F. R. C. P. 

Senior Assistayit Physicimi to Weshninster Hospital. 

The most popular and successful Medical Journal now before the profession. It 

is printed on fine paper, from new type, and is excelled by no Medical 

Journal in the excellence of its naechanical execution. 

SINGLE COPIES, ioleiiterToUE'DOLLAES PEE ANNUM.. 

One of the greatest wants of the Medical Profession in this country is a special 
medium for the intercommunications of ideas respecting the action of remedies 
Scattered over the country there are a considerable number of able men who are 
already engaged in careful and scientific observation of this kind, but who from 
lack of the opportunity of communicating with each other, waste much time and 
energy in repeating experiments which have been already made, and in com- 
mitting errors of observation which some fellow-worker could have saved them 
from. It is hoped that the Pkactitio2sER will assist towards a better under- 
standing on these important subjects. 

The Practitioner will appear monthly, and will thus supply the most recent 
information obtained on all subjects connected with the application of remedies 
for disease, and as its bulk of matter will not be great, it is hoped that business 
men will master its contents without difficulty. 

The Editor hopes to supply the Medical Practitioners of this country the same 
kind of information which is widely disseminated in France, Germany and Italy 
by periodicals which are either entirely devoted, or accord a large space, to pa- 
pers on the practical treatment of disease. 

Each number contains a series of snort original articles upon important special 
subjects in Therapeutics ; a brief resume of the more interesting items of treatment 
recorded in the foreign journals; s^ort reviews of important works bearing on. 
treatment ; a brief sketch of Practical Medicine for the month, as observed in the 
London and provincial hospitals ; a department for Notes and Queries, in which. 
correspondents may ask, and obtain replies to, questions in reference to prob- 
lems on which they desire to have the opinions of other medical men • and 
finally, a bibliographical list for the month. ' ' 

J^'Specimen Copies Sent upon Application. 

LOOK AT OUR CJL.TJB RATES. 

xY. B.^SuhdCripllons can Cuittineuce iviUi u.iy 2\uhi,ltt,r. 

The Practitioner and the Journal of the Gynaecological Society of Boston, 

(Monthly,) per annum j6 00 

The Practitioner and the New York Medical Journal, per annum 7 00 

The Practitioner and the American Journal of Medical Sciences, (Quarter- 
ly,) with the Medical News and Library, (Monthly,) g 00 

Tlie Practitioner and the New Orleans Journal of Medicine, (Quarterly,)... 8 00 
The Practitioner and the American Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of 

Women and Children, (Quarterly,) 7 00 

The Practitioner and Braithwaite's Retrospect, (Half Yearly,) 5 50- 

The Practitioner and Rankin's xVbstractof Practical Medicine and Surgery, 

(Half Yearly,) 5 50 

FOPtEiG-nsr JOXJi^:iNr.A.i-S. 

The Practitioner and tlie Edinburgh Medical Journal, combining the 
Monthly Journal of Medicine and Edinburgh Medical and Surgical 

Journal, (Monthly,) 12 00- 

The Pi-n>ctitioner and tlie Loudon Lancet, (Published Weekly,) 14 00 

The Practitioner and the London Medical Times and Gazette, (Weekly,).... 15 00 

*.i:*The Edinburgh Medical Journal, the Lancet, and the Times and Gazette are 
mailed direct to our subscribers froiii the oflice of publicatfon in Edinburgh, and 
London on the day of their publication. 

Pnjimcnt in nil cases rnuct be in advance. 

Remittances for subscription, or otherwise, should be made by draft or post'- 
ofiice order to the publishers. 

KELLY, PIET & CO., 

X74: Bcdtlmore Street, Baltimore, 



W. F. DAILY, 

S34: BJ^IL.TIl.<tOI?.E STTS^EBT, 

THREE DOORS WEST OF CHARLES, 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 




iVlSXi4& lM.§lli eOODi, 



ARTIFICIAL EYES, SPLINTS, 



And Surgical Appliances of Every Description. 



On hand one of the largest assortments in the country, and will make to order 
or furnish any instrument wanted. I would ask especial attention to 



Instruments of my Own Manufacture, 



Which I will not permit to be SURPASSED by any in the United States. I feel 

competent to give satisfaction, having 35 years experience, and would 

refer to every Physician in Baltimore. My 



▼ill llAf I© 111 



I believe will be the only Truss worn in the world when its merits become 
known. All orders from a distance promptly filled. Letters of enquiry answer- 
ed immediately, and Circulars sent to Physicians who will send me their ad- 
dress. 



234 Baltimore Street, Balto. 




f 



This Journal is independent of all other interests, and devoted 
solely to the advancement of 

MEDICAL SCIENCE AND OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION, 
Particularly of the Southern and Middle States. 

It is issued regularly on the first of each month, and every num- 
ber will contain not less than sixty -four pages, consisting of 

*■ 
Original Communications, 

Reviczvs, 
Reports of Proceedings of Medical Societies, 
Selections from Home aftd Foreign jfmrnals, 

Editorial Comments, Etc 

All communications and subscriptions should be addressed to 
^'Drs. HOWARD & LATIMER, Postoffice Box 1023, Baltimore." 

Money can be sent in Postoffice Order or Registered Letter. 

TERMS — Four Dollars a year, in advance. 

E. LLOYD HOWARD, M. D., 
T. S. LATIMER, M. D., 

Editors and Proprietors. 



OFFICE — Corner Centre and St. Paul Sts. 



TILDEN & CO. 

MANUFACTURING 

Pharmaceutists and Cliemists, 

AND 

176 WILLIAM STREET, New York City. 



X^XTRE] 



%ii & FUi Isti 



ALKALOIDS AND RESINOIDS, 

PHARMACEUTIC SUaAR-COATED PILLS AND G-RANULES 

FINE CHEMICALS, 

PharmaceTitic Preparations, Elixirs, Syrups, &c. 

PKEPAilATIONS OF THE PHARMACOPIEIA. 



Many important remedies and preparations have been added to 
our list, and the attention of the Medical Profession is specially 
called to them. Supplement to Journal of Materia 3Iedica, sent on 
application. 

SUPPLEMENT TO THE 

. mmm i a mwmmm a 



This is a book of 212 pages. It contains a brief summary of the action and uses 
of the principal articles of the Materia Medica, including their Doses, most impor- 
tant Contra-indications, Incompatibles and Antidotes, together with the Analyses 
of the principal Mineral Waters of Europe and the United t^tates, and Forraula3 
for Dietetic Preparations, &c. Sent postage paid, on receipt of 25 cents. 

TILDEN & COMPANY, 
New Lebanon, N. Y., and 176 William Street, N. Y. City- 



THE RICHMOND AND LOUISVILLE 

The Largest Medical Monthly in America. 
. ^ 'E. S. GAILLARD, M.D., 

Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine in the Louisville Medical Collcje; late 

Professor in the Kentucky School of Medicine; in the Cumberland 

University, Nashville, Tenn. ; in the Medical 

College of Virgiyiia, etc., 

EDITOK AND PROPRIETOK, 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS: 

Prof. G. ^^. Bedfokd, ISTgw York. Prof. J. M, Hollow AY, Louisville, Ky. 

" J L. CABEiiii, University of Va> " L. S. Joynes, Riclimond, Va. 

" S. E. Chaillb, New Orleans, " Henry Miller, Louisville, Ky. 

" S. C. Chew, Baltimore, Md. " Z. Pitcher, Detroit, Mich. 

" J. J. Chisolm, Baltimore, Md. " Lewis A. Sayre, New York. 

" S. H. Dickson, Philadelphia. " Alfred Stille, Philadelphia. 

'• Paul F. Eve, St. Louis, Mo. " T, Gaillard Thomas, N. Y. 

" F. H. Hamilton, New York. " W. H. Van Buren, New Y'ork. 

This Journal was established in Richmond, Va., Januarj', 1866, and has now 
reached its ninth volume. It was remo^'ed to Louisville, Kentucky, by the in- 
vitation of tlie Kentucky State Medical Society, May, 1868. 

It is the only Medical Journal in this State. Its circulation has been doiibled 
during the past year, and is now constantly increasing; the present circulation 
is 1,251); of this number, over 300 copies are sent to Kentucky phj^sicians every 
month, over 500 copies to physicians immediately south of Kentucky, and 400 to 
physicians in the Northern States. 

This Journal contains more matter for the price of .subscription (five dollars 
in paper currency, annually,) than was ever published in this countrj'-, pre- 
viously to the war, for five dollars annually in gold. In addition to this induce- 
ment to subscribers, each number contains a lithographic engraving of some 
distinguished member of the European or American medical profession. These 
engravings (or pliotographic likenesses of the same persons) cannot bo purchased 
for less than twenty-five cents each; the twelve engravings thus issued in the 
Journal amounting in value to fully three dollars annually. The cost of the 
Journal proper is thus reduced to two dollars in currency, or less than half of 
the price charged (in gold) for a less amount of reading matter before the war. 
No such inducement has ever been ottered in this country or elsewhere to jour- 
nal readers. Eacli subscriber sending five dollars receives in engravings the 
equivalent of three dollars, and receives for the two dollars remiiining a larger 
medical journal than has ever been published in this country for five dollars 
annually in gold 

Tlie associate editors and contributors represent the most accomplished 
writers and practitioners in America. The subscribers to this Journal have 
always contributed largely to its pages, and it is hoped that this agreealile feat- 
ure of the Journal will always be manifest. Subscribers are particularly in- 
vited to contribute. None of the attractive promises usually jnade Avill be made 
iiere, bvit tlie patrons of the Journal are assured that no ex])ense possible, no 
labor or care will be spared to make the Journal a welcome and useful visitor 
to its supporters. The engravings for the next year will l)e as follows : Sir James 
Simpson, Baron Liebig, Sir William Fergusson. C. Virchow, Cruveilhier, Roki- 
tansky. Trousseau, Chelius, Civiale, Thomas King Chambers, Ricord, Claude 
Bernard. 

Subscribers are earnestly asked to aid in developingthe material of the Jour- 
nal and to induce tlieir friends to contribute, l^otli by purse and pen, to its sup- 
port. 

The editor returns his earnest thanks to the friends and patrons of the Jour- 
nal, and asks a continuance of their kindness and support. 
Address 

Dp. E. S. gaillard, Editor and Proprietor, 



E L E a A. N^ T 

PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS, 

MANUFACTURED BY 

JOHN WYETH & BROTHER, 

'PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



The attentiou of Physicians is solicited to out more reeent Pharmaceutical 
Preparations. Our facilities for manufacturing enable us to offer these prepara- 
tions at a less rate to Physicians and Druggists than they can be prepared for, 
except on a very large scale. They are made v/ith scrupulous exactness, and are 
in every respect identical v.'ith what we dispense over our retail counters. They 
will be supplied by the leading Druggists in all our large cities, or we will send 
samples to Physicians, with price list, free of charge. 

Elixir Phospliate Iron, Quinine and Stryelinia.— There is perhaps no prescription fo generally 
nsed and witli SUCH gratifying results, as tiie above conibiiiation. Owing to the intensely bitter taste of the 
solution or the syrup, patieats very generally object to them, and many sensitive stomachs reject their admin- 
istration. Physicians hesitate to prescribe in piU form from the want of prompt action — the frequent passing 
away from the system undissolved, and the occasional cumulative action of the Strychnia, when the pills are 
long retained. This Elixir has been extensively used with very gratifying results, and does not seem open to 
any of the above objections. Using pure Alkaloids of Quinine and Strychnia, the excess of acid is not reinired, 
the bitter taste is not developed, and the Elixir is readily taken by children as well as adults. Each leaspoon- 
ful contains two grains of Phosphate of Iron, one of Quinia, and one-sixtieth of a grain of Strychnia. Adult 
dose, one teaspoonful three times a day. 

Ferro-Piiosphoreted Elixir of Gentian.— This preparation is identical in strength with the Comp. 
Infusion of Gentian of the Pharmacopoeia, with the addition cf one grain of Phosphoreted Iron to each tea- 
spoonful. This Ferro-Phosphoreted Tonic Bitter excites the appetite, invigorates digestion, and operates as a 
general corroborant. Blended with Aromatics, and slightly acidulated with Phosphoric Acid, it proves grate- 
ful to the most delicate stomach, (iive to children one-half to a teaspoonful before eating. Adults, a dessert- 
gpoonful as often. 

Elixir of Hops.— This preparation represents, in the most agreeable form, the Tonic and Anodyne 
Properties of Hops. There are few medicines of more real value, and less open to objection from continued 
nse, in cases of wakefulness, nervous tremors, and the gcL-eral irritability so often associated with Dyspepsia. 
This equals in strensth the official Tincture of Hops. Adult dose, one or two teaspoonfuls. 

Elixir Valerianate of Ammonia, [Goddard's Formula.]— This preparation, combining the stimulant 
?ii4 anti-spasmodic properties of both Valerian and Ammonia, in a form agreeable and convenient, has proved 
a vamable agent in all cases of Nervous Derangement, Neuralgia, Hysteria, Nervous Headache, and in all 
those complicated diaordera consequent upon nervou^i debility and depression. Adult dose, one or two tCii- 
epoonfuls. 

Elixir Valerianate Ammonia and i^iuininc.- This is simply otir Elixir Valerianate of Ammonia, 
with the addition of one grain of Quinia to eacn tiuid drachm. It is an agreeable and ell'ective Anodyne and a 
powerful Nerve Tonic. Physicians and ApctUecaries will find it a much more elegant preparation than can be 
prepared extemporaneously, or that can be ra.idefrom any of the salts of Quinine. 

Elixir of Calisaya Bark.- An Agreeable Stomachic and ao Efficient Tonic— This is a most delightful 
and energetie tonic and restorative. Prepared with Sherry Wine, Peruvian Bark, and Aromatics, it is pecu- 
liarly grateful to patients suffering from debility, loss of appetite, and general lack of nervous force. Each fluid 
drachm represents five grains Calisaya B*rk. Directions— A teaspoonful for children, a dessert-spoonful to 
adults, three times a day, or as required. 

Elixir of the Pyrophospliate of Iron.— Iron with Phosphorus and Calisaya.— Promptly tonic, with- 
out being irritating or Btimulant, combining the effects of Phosphorus and Iron with the cordial and tonic in- 
fluences of the Ciiichona Elixir. The freedom from all unpleasant taste, and the ease with which this prepara- 
tion is borne by even the most sensitive stomachs, together with its ready assimilation with the food, and con- 
fequent rapid absorption, render this preparation specially valuable. It is used with benedt in all instances 
where a nerve tonic is Indicated. Each teaspoonful represents the activity of five grains of Calisaya Bark, to- 
gether with two grains of the Soda-Pyrophospliate of Iron. This Salt of Iron is not precipitated in the stomach 
by the agency of food or gastric juice, and will be found an elhcient chalybeate when ordinary iron prepara- 
tions produce constipation, headache, etc. The dose for an adult is a teaspoonful three times a day, immedi- 
ately before or after meals. For children, to be graduated according to age. 

Ferrated Elixir of Cinchona.— Iron, Peruvian Bark, and Choice Aromatics.— This preparation cm- 
Tjodies the cordial, tonic, and anti-periodic properties of its constituents so modified by the combination as to 
avoid the objectionable effects of their distinct action, its constant and continued use by our leading practi- 
tioners, and its often attested good results, warrant our decided endorsement of its merits. Eacii dessert- 
epoonful represents two grains soluble Citrate of Iron, and ten grains red Peruvian Bark. The dose for an 
adult is a dessert-spoonful three times a day, immediately before or after meals. For children, to be graduated 
according to a^e. 

Elixir Pepsin, Bismuth and Strychnia,— This combination consists of Pepsin (prepared from the 
stomach of the pig), with the soluble Ciirate of Bismuth, and one-sixtieth of a grain Strychnia to each fluid 
drachm. It has been employed with very great success in Dyspepsia, Gastralgia, General Debility of the Sys- 
tem, and in all the aumerous disorders dependent on want of tone and vigor of tho stomach and digestiva or- 
gans. 

Compound Syrup of Eypophosphites.— This preparation, suggested by the experience and re- 
searches of Dr. Churchill, is composed of tue Hypophosphites of Lime, Soda, Potassa and Iron. The theory of 
the advantage of the Hypophosphites is based upon the elimination of free Phosphorus into the system. The 
therapeutic effect would seem to sustain the value cf this preparation, from the benefits derived from their wse, 
both here and abroad. Each fluid drachm contains two grains Lime, two grains Soda, one grain Potassa, one 
half grain Iron. Adult dose, one teaspoonful three or four times a day. 

Bitter Wine of Iron,— C;trateof iron and Peruvian Bark.— Prepared with Sherry Wine, Calisaya 
Bark, and Citrate of Iron ; each fluid drachm represents two grains of the ferruginous salt, and the activity of 
five grains of Calisaya Bark. Among the many chalybeate and vegetable tonic combinations that are justly 
t-ntitled to a high degree of favor, we know of none more worthy of esteem than this. The happy effect, in 
many casei of debility, loss of ajjpetite and general prostration, of an efficient Salt of Iron, combined with our 
most valuable Nerve Tonic, has been so frequently demonstrated, that we feel confident in recommending It. 
For an adult, a teaspoonfuiimmediately before or after each meal. 

Compound Syrup of Phosphates, or Chemical Food.— Composed of the Phosphates of Lime, 
Soda, Potassa and Iron.— This preparation was introduced by Prolassor Jackson, of the Universiiy of Pennsyl- 
vania, and has been extensively prescribed with very gratifj-ing results. It is not intended as a popular rem- 
edy, but is Bubmitted to the Medical Faculty as a nutritive tonic, well suited to supply the waste of elementary 

[Continued on next page.l 



WYETH & BUO.'S PHEPARATIONS-Continued. 



matter of the human system during the progress of chronic cases, particularly in Dyspepsia and In Consnmp- 
tlon. By careful and iutelligent manipulation, the salts are all held in complete solution ; hence their efficiency 
in a small dose. Tliis preparation ia pleasant to the eye, agreeable to the taste, and grateful to the KtomacU, 
and does not nauseate by protracted use. Each fluid drachm contains one grain freshly precipitate Phosphate 
of Iron, two grains Phosphate of I-ime, ono grain Phosphate of Soda, one-half grain Phosphate of Potassa, with 
Blight excess Phosphoric Acid. Adult dose, a teaspoonful. 

Perrated Cordial Elixir.— This Elixir rivals in delicate and deliciona flavor the most prized of the for- 
eign cordials. Specially grateful to a sensitive and delicate stomach, it stimulates digestion and invigorates the 
whole system. For the general debility, nervous prostration and loss of vigor of females and children, it ia 
particularly indicated. The healthy color, renewed muscular force, buoyant spirits and regained appetite, give 
the best evidence of the rapid assimilation of the Clialybeate Salt. Each fluid drachm contains one grain of 
Pyrophosphate of Iron. Directions— Children, one-half to a teaspoonful before eating. Adults should take a 
tablespoonful as often. 

Elixir Bromide Potassium.— The Elixir contains five grains Bromide I'otassinm In each teaspoonfal, 
and is an agreeable and elegant form of administering this highly prized alterative and nerve sedative. The 
objectionable saline taste is completely masked in this Elixir, and the Bromide will be found less apt to pro- 
duce nausea and derangement of the digestive organs. 

, Wyeth & Bro.'s Cod Liver Oil.— We offer to Physicians a Cod Liver Oil, perfectly rtfRE, prepared 
■with scrupulous care, and perfectly free from any acrid, bitter, or empyreumatic taste. Physicians will find 
that patients sensitive to the taste and unable to digest the ordinary oil, can take this readily and with the con- 
sequent benefit of so valued a nutriment. Very deUcate persons should take in teaspoonful doses for the first 
few days, and increase as the physician may direct. Put in 16 oz. bottles. 

Elixir Calisaya Bark, Iron and "Bismuth.— This Elixir contains one grain of Soluble Citrate of 
Bismuth in each teaspoonful of the Ferrated Elixir of Cinchona. The addition of the Soluble Salt of Bismuth 
gives increased vaiuo, in causes of debility, dependent on enfeebled digestion, or associated with gastritis. 

Elixir Calisaya Bark, Iron and Strychnia.- Each teaspoonful contains one-fiftieth of a grain of 
Strychnia ; this euliauces the tonic power, and will be found a valuable adjunct to the other constituents, when 
a powerful nerve tonic is desired. Each fluid drachm contains Calisaya Bark, two grains Iron, one^fiftieth 
grain Strychnia. 

Wine of Pepsin.— From the Stomach of the Pig.— This is the most effective and agreeable form of ad- 
ministering Gastric Juice as an aid to enfeebled digestion. We add in tlie preparation of our Wine of Pepsin, 
a small c,uantity of Lactic Acid, supplying the want of the necessary acid, and increasing greatly the efficiency 
of the remedy. Adult dose, oue to two teaspoonfuU. 

» Perrated Wine or Wild Cherry Bark.— Few medicines combine so pleasantly as valuable eflfecta 
as the carefully selected bark of tlie Wild Cherry. Uniting a tonic, expectorant and sedative influence, it l3 
indicated in most cases of debilitj-, particularly when accompanied by local irritation. By careful and elegant 
pharmacy, we combine in this preparation a protosalt of Iron, giving the advantage of a combination so fre- 
quently desired. Each fluid drachm contains twenty grains of the Bark, two grains Iron. 

Wine of Wild Cherry Bark.— This is a pleasant and concentrated preparation of Wild Cherry Bark, 
and will prove an elegant form of administering this valued tonic and sedative. Each fluid drachm represents 
twenty grains of the bark, collected at the proper season. Adult dose, one teaspoonful. 

vWine of Ergot, — There is no preparation more dependent for its value upon intelligent selection of the 
drug and careful preparation, than Wine of Ergot, anjliierhnps none more uncertain in cft'ect as generally dis- 
pensed. We have long i)reparedit with carefully selected and fresh ergot, and feel assured physicians will not 
be disappointed in the effect. Strength, United States Dispensatory. 

Elixir Valerianate of Strychnia.- The hitter taste of the Strychnia is masked in this preparation, 
and will be found perhaps more efiective than when given in pill form. Each teaspoonful represents (1-40) one- 
fortieth of a grain of Stryclmia. The adult dose is one teaspoonful. 

Comp. Syrup Phosphate of Manganese.— This preparation of Manganese, Iron and Soda has been 
extensively used with alnios-t unilorm good results iu many cases of anemic condition, in which iron has failed 
to benefit. The salts are prepared iVesh, and held in solution by a slight excess of aid. Each teaspoonful con- 
tains one grain Phosphate of Iron, one of Manganese, and two of Soda. Dose, one teaspoonful. Physicians 
will find this an exceedingly valuable addition to their list of remedies. 

Solution Carbolic Acid.— We prepare this solution of a uniform strength, with full directions as to 
use. It will be found much more convenient for both internal and external use, than the Glacial Carbolic Acid, 
«r any of the many Carbolic Acids, of uncertain strength, now imported. Each fluid ounce contains forty 
grains of the Glacial Acid. Put up in 10 oz. bottles. We have also the Pure Chrvstalized Acid iu 1 oz. G. S. 
bottles. 

Syrup Superphosphate of Iron.— This preparation is prepared from the recently precipitated Phos- 
phate of Iron ; will keep in any climate, and is a deservedly popular remedy. Each fluid drachm contains 
three grains of Phosphate of Iron, with an excess of Phosphoric Acid. Adult dose, one teaspoonful, immedi- 
ately after meals. 

Elixir of Bismuth.— The greater efficiency of Eismnth in solution, over the insoluble salts, tisnally 
Ctven, recommends this preparation in the many cases of gastro-intestinal irritation, in wliich Bismuth ia In- 
dicated. This Elixir contains two grains of the Citrate of Bismuth in each fluid drachm. Adult dose, one tea- 
spoonful. • 

Comp. Fluid Ext. Buchu and Pareira Erava.— This fluid extract is composed of equal quantities 
of Buchu, Pareira Brava, and Collinsoiiia Canadensis. As a tonic and diuretic, it will be found of great value; 
exerting prompt remedial action in Calculous A flections, Chronic Inflammation, and Ulceration of the KidoeyH 
and Bladder, Leucorrhoia, Dropsy, <kc. In Chronic Inflammation of the Bladder, for allaying irritability of 
that organ, and correcting the disposition to profuse mucous secretion, we specially recommend it. Adult dose, 
one teaspoonful. three times a day. 

Suppositories.— Rectal, Vaginal, and Male Urethral Suppositories and Soluble Pessaries of pure Butter 
Cacao, made with great care, and of every variety of combination. Lists sent on application. 

Sponge Tents.— For the Urethra, of every size and style, made of fiuest quality of sponge. Can be or- 
dered with or without Carbolic Acid. 

Medicinal Pearls.— Pearls of Chloroform, Apiol, Oil of Turpentine, Copabia, Worraseed Oil, Oleo Resia 
Cubebs, Oils of Copabia and Cubebs. 

Surgeons' Roller Bandages.— Wo have always in store a large assortment of Surgeons' Roller Ban- 
dages of every size. For convenience of physicians we have them put up iu boxes, eight dozen In each, assort- 
ed sizes. Hospitals furnished at low rates by the gross. 

* (^ In addition to the above, we prepare all the other popular Pharmacenllcal com- 
binationsj which we supply at reasonable prices. 



JOHN "WYETH & BRO., ^■ 

^ 1412 Walnut Street, Philadelphia^ 



For sale also at our prices hy all the prominent Wholesale 
Druggists in the Thiied States, 



CODMAN & SHURTLEFF'S 

APPARATUSES FOR 

Atoiization of Lipitls for Malatlon, Local Ansstliesia, &c. 

By the Atomizer, any medicated liquid maybe converted into the finest spray. In this 
state it may be inhaled into the smallest air-cells, thus opening a new era in the treatment 
of all diseases of the throat and lungs. 

The Complete Steam Atomizer for Inhalation, <© c. 

{See Fig. 16.) 

It consists of the sphere-shaped brass boiler 
A, steam outleMubajB, with packing-box C form- 
ed to receive rubber packing through which the 
atomizing tube D passes, steam-tight, and by 
means of which, tubes of various sizes may be 
tightly held against any force of steam, by screw- 
ing down its cover while the packing is warm ; 
the safety- vRlve E, capable of graduation for 
high or low pressure by the spring or screw in 
its top, the non-conducting handle F, by whi(ih 
The boiler may be lifted while hot, the medica- 
ment-cup and cup-holder G, the support H, iron 
base I 1, the glass face-shield J, with oval mouth- 
piece connected by the elastic band K with the 
cradle L, whose slotted staff' passes into a slot 
in the shield-stand M M, where it may be fixed 
J. at any height or angle required by the milled- 
screw N. 
15. The Complete Steam Atomizer, for , The waste-cup, medicament-cup and lamp are 
Inhalation dc held m their places m such a manner that they 

Patented Mar. 24, 1868', and Mar. 16, '69. cannot fall out when the apparatus is carried or 

' ' used over a bed or otherwise. 

All its joints are hard soldered. It cannot be injured by exhaustion of water, or any attain • 
able pressure of st^am. 
It does not throw spirits of hot water, to frighten or scald the patient. 
Is compact and portable, occupies space of one-sixth cubic foot only, can be carried from 
place to place without removing the atomizing tubes or the water, can be unpacked and re- 
packed without loss of time. 

Will render the best of service for many years, and is cheap in the best sense of the word. 
Price $6.00. 
Neatly made, strong, Black Walnut Box, with convenient handle, additional, $2.50. 

SJiurtleff's Atomizing Apparatus, (See Fig. 5,) for Inhalation, and with suitable 
tubes, for Local Anjesthesia, and for making direct local applications of atomized liquids for 

a great variety of purposes. [See our 
Pamphlet.] 

The most desirable Hand Apparatus. 

Rubber warranted of very best quality. 

Valves of hard rubber, every one 
carefully fitted to its seat, and work 
perfectly in all positions. 

The Bulbs are adapted to all the 
Tubes made by us for Local Anaesthe- 
sia in Surgical Operations, Teeth Ex 
traction, and for Inhalation. 
Price $4.50. 





Shurtlcff's Atomizing Apparatus. 
Patented March 24, 1868. 




Each of the above Apparatuses is .supplied with 
two carefully made annealed glass Atomizing Tubes 
and accompanied with directions for use. Every 
Steam Apparatus is tested with steam, at veryhigii 
pressure. Each apparatus is carefully packed for 
transportation, and warranted perfect. Also— 

The Boston Atomizer^ with two glass atomizing 
tubes «3.0i) 

T7ie Treniont Atomizer, with two glass atomizing 
tubes $2-50 

Nickel Flated Tiibes, for Local Anaesthesia and 
C for Inhalation, each $2.00 

JRhigolene, for Local Auiestliesia, best quality 

Fiq. U. Nasal Douche, with Two packed $1.00 

Nozzles— %2.m. 

Nasal Douche No. 6, see Fig. 6. 
Nasal Douche, for treating Diseases of the Nasal Cavity, eight difierent varieties, each with 

two Nozzles, packed ....«!. 20, 1.50, 1.75, 2.00 and 3.50. 

N. B— To save collection expenses, funds should be sent with the order, either in form ol 
raft, post-office order, or registered letter. 

[For complete illustrated price-list of Apparatus, Tubes, &e„ see Pamphlet] 

[SEE NEXT PAGE.] 



CC^Will be sent by mail (post-paid) on application, 

A. FA.MPHLET, 

containing two articles, by distinguished foreign authority, on 

"INHALATION OF ATOMIZED LIQUIDS," 

with formulte of those successfully employed. 
Also, an article by Dr. J. L. W. Tht;dichum,M. R. C. P., on 

"A NEW MODE OF TREATING DISEASES OF THE NASAL CAVITY," 

with his formulce. 

Also an illustrated description of the best apparatuses for the above purposes, and for pro- 
•lucing Zocal Antesthesia by Atomization with Ether, by the method of Dr. Richardson, ol 
London ; or with Rhigolene, as described by Dr. Henry J. Bigelow, in the Boston Medical and 
Surgical Journal, of April 19, 1860. . . 

•JLll our Atotnlzitig Instrtiments are made with the utmost care, with 8. view totheir 
complete etticiency, convenience and durability, and every one is warranted. A Gold Medal 
has lately been awarded us by the Middlesex Mechanics' Association, for Atomizing and 
Surgical Instruments, as will be seen from the following report, signed by a leading ^ew 
England Surgeon and Physician: 

"1503. Codman <£• Shurileff, Boston, Mass. One Case Surgical Instruments and Atomizers. 

"The Committee have no hesitation in awarding for this superb exhibition the highest pre- 
mium. * * * * The various other instruments for Inhalation of Atomized Li- 
quids, and for Local Anaesthesia, were all apparently faultless, both in design and workman- 
ship. The exhibitors are regarded as more especially deserving of the nighest token ot 
merit for having produced nothing except of their own manufacture — Gold Medal. 

(Signed) GILMAN KIMBALL, M. D., Chairman. 

Also by the Mass. Charitable Mechanics' Association.— Exhibition of 1869.- A Silver Me- 
dal, the Highest Medal awarded for Surgical Instruments. 



J^LSO JEHOK SALE 



■*Cammann's Stethoscopes :— 

Disarticulating $7.00 

With Adjustable Ear pressure 8.50 / 

^Knight's xModification 9.50 

Simple Throat Mirrors 1.00 

Ophthalmoscopes, Liebreich's....5.00 to 7.00 

Holt's Dilator, improved 20.00 

Barnes's " set of three, with Inflator 

and Stopcocks 7.00 

Large Ear Mirrors, Tr61tsche'.s...4..50 to 5,00 

Hypodermic Syringes..... 3.50 to 14.00 

*Miller's Intra-Uterine tSacrificator, in 

case, (post-paid) 7.00 

Lente's Intra-Uterine Caustic Instru- 
ments 1.25 to 3.50 

Sponge. Tents, plain & carbolized, each 25 
*Dr. Cutter's Retroversion and other 
Pessaries 3.00 



French Rubber Urinals, with valves, 

male, for night or day ^.00 

Male, day only 2.50 to 4.00 

French Rubber Urinals, female, for day 

only 3.00 

Vaccine Virus, warranted, 10 quills 1.50 

1 Crust 3.00 

*Vaccinator's, Whittemore's Patent Au- 
tomatic, for Crust or Lymph fresh 
from arm, — Instantaneous, certain, 

and almost painless (post-paid) 3.00 

Powder Syringes 2-00 

Laryngoscopes, complete 18.00 to 28.00 

*Dr. Oliver's Laryngoscopic Lantern... 4.00 
The same with Auio-Laryngoscopic 

attachment 5.00 

The same with ditto and three Laryn- 

goseophic Mirrors, in case 9.00 

*Dr. H. R. Storer's Combined Speculum 600 



* Send for Descriptive Circular. 

Amputating, Trephining, Exsecting, Pocket, Dissecting, Throat, Ear, Eye, Uterine, Obste- 
tric, and all other special and general sets of Instruments on hand and made up to order. 

Trusses — Spinal and Abdominal Supporters— Shoulder Braces— Suspensory Bandages- 
Elastic Hose— Medicine Trunks and Pocket Medicine Ca<es— Otoscopes— Endoscopes— 
Dr. Sayre's Splints for Hip Joint Disease— Fever Thermometers— Respirators — Syringes 
— Crutches — Universal Syringes — Galvanic Batteries and Apparatus — French Conical and 
Olive-Tipped Bougies and Catheters. 

Skeletons, Skulls, and Anatomical Charts on hand; Manikins, Anatomical and Pathological 
Models imported to order ; prices on application. All Instruments. Implements, and 
Materials used by Dentists, always on hand. Apparatus for Club Feet, Weak Ankles, 
Bow Legs, Spinal Curvature, and other deformities, made to order. 

Apparatus for Paracentesis Thoracis, approved by Dr. Bowditch, and accompanied with di 

lections kindly furnished by him. 

Having our manufactory with steam power, and a corps of experienced workmen connect 

ed with our store, we are able promptly to make to order new Instruments and apparatus, 

and to .supply new inventions on favorable terms. 

INSTRUMENTS SHAHFUNJED, POLISnEB & BEPAIRED. 



CODMAN & SHURTLEFF, 

Malcers and Imj^orters of Surgical and Dental Instruments^ 

13 & 15 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



REED, CARNRICK & ANDRUS, 

MANUFACTURING 
NEW YORK. 



TO THE MEDICAL PBOFESSIOJY. 

The design of our manufacturing establishment is to keep pace with the require- 
mients of physicians in Pharmacy, and to lend in the production of elegant and reliable 
preparations. No one can doubt our success who is acquainted with their extended 
use by leading practitioners, and with the fact that they are copied from our list as 
soon as produced, bv numerous houses in every section of the country. 

Physicians and "iDruggists, in writing for our preparations, should designate them 
as R., C. and A.'s, to prevent substitution. Circulars, containing minute description 
and formula of each preparation, also price lists, &c., furnished upon application, 
with pleasure. 

MISCELLANEOUS LIST OF 

PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. 

The palatability of an Elixir depends, as a matter of necessity, npon tlie offensiveness of its ingredients, -which 
always can, to a great extent, be disguised ; but -when if is offered by any parties so extremely pleasant that very little 
but the Elixir is perceptible to the palate, it certainly can contain but a small proportion of the medicinal ingrredients. 

We were the first to originate and introduce moat of the Elixirs in this country, and their popularity among physi- 
cians In every part of the United States has caused ns to feel » pride in keeping them invariably up to the standard. 

The profession will always find otir Elixir as palatable as pharmaceutical science can make them, aud still contain 
the quantity of each Ingredient represented on the lables and dose books. 

Elixir Calisaya, Iron and Bismuth.— Since we originated this preparation it has become immensely popular In 
every part of the United States. It is extensively used In Dyspepsia, Anemia, Female Debility, and as a 
genferal tonic. 

Elixir Cinchona, Iron and Strychnia.— It is especially adapted to cases of general debility, attended with 
nervous prostration, and it is successfully used in Chlorosis, Constipation, Indigestion, when there is a ten- 
dency to Paralysis, aud in all conditions of the system where a nervous tonic, combined with general tonics, in 
desired, 

Comp. Elixir Stillingia.— One of the most powerful, prompt, and efficient alteratives, and is uied In Syphilitic, 
Scrofulous, Osseous and Glandular Diseases, and in all depraved conditions of the blood. 

£lixir Citrate Lithia.— Expressly adapted In cases where It is desirable to eliminate uric add from the system, 
and to prevent deposits of insoluble salts in the bladder, and to dissolve them when formed there. It U un- 
doubtedly superior to any preparation produced in Bheumatism, Gout, and Urinary Deposits. 

Elixir Valerianate of Morphia.- Jlore efficacious and palatable than Valerianate of Ammonia. Used ai a seda- 
tive in nervous affections, restlessness, <fcc. 

Elixir Propylamine.— Used principally in Rheumatism. The offensiveness is almost entirely dlsjillsed. 

Cod Liver oil with Eypophosphites.— (Lime aud Soda.)— Each ounce contains eight grains of the combined 
Salts. Used in Coughs, Colds, and Pulmonary alfections generally. 

ELIXIRS— Phos. Iron, Quinine and Strychnia; Valerianate of Ammonia and Qninia ; Valerianate of Ammonia; 
Gentian and Chlo. Iron; Valerianate Zinc; lodid. Calcium and Protoxide of Iron ; Bark and Pyro. Iron; Bark 
and? Protoxide of Iron : Calisaya: Lupulin : Phosphate of Iron; Bromide Ammonium; Bromide Potassium; 
Protox. Iron with Iodide Potassium ; Protox. Iron and Quinia; Rhubarb and Colunibo Comp. 

SYRUPS— Phos. Iron, Quinine and Strychnia ; Iodide of Starch ; Iodide of Iron and Manganese ; lodldej Lime ; 
Superphosphate Iron ; Stillingia Comp.; Blackberry (Aromatic); Sarsaparilla Comp., U. 8. P. 

WINES— Calisaya (Ferrated); Wild Cherry; Wild Cherry (Ferrated); Iron (Bitter); Styptic Colloid; Cblorodyu; 
Tannate Bismuth; Citrate Bismuth ; Cactharidal Vesicant ; Solution Carbolic Acid ; Cod Liver Oil. 

SELIBRILE ELIXIRS OF 

MEDICINAL VEGETABLE SUBSTANCES. 

The word "Selibrile," used In connection with the following Elixirs, is derived from the Latin word Belibra, and 
means half pound. We use the word Selibrile to distinguish them from the purported strength of Fluid Extracts, and 
thus avoid mistakes which might possibly occur in supposing them to b« ''pound for pound" instead of a half 
pound of the Root, Herb or Bark to a pound of menstruum. 

We respectfully invite the attention of every practitioner to the following class of preparations. There Is, proba- 
bly, not one physician in a thousand, who has thoroughly tested the medicinal virtues of Fluid Extracts iu his practice, 
but what has found them unreliable; and the question has undoubtedly arisen in his mind, and why are they so ? 
The first and most important reason is that one pound of ohv menstruum will not hold the medicinal properties of one 
pound of the Roots, Herbs and Barks that are used in medicine. In proof of this, take from any Druggist's shelf a 
Fluid Extract, made as represented, pound for pouud, and you will find a precipitate in the bottle, which, upon 
examination, will show a large portion of the medicinal virtues. On the other hand, when they are found in the 
market without sediment In the bottle, It is safe to Infer that they do not contain ponnd for pound. 



REED, CARNRICK 55 ANDRUS' PREPARATIONS-Continued. 

We have been experimenting with th« vegetable substances user! In medicine during the past year, with a view of 
placing Fluid Extracts on our list. The result of these experiments has convinced us that we could not, with any 
uniform reliability, say to any Physiciau: If you prescribe one tluid drachm of our Extract you will obtain all the 
medicinal virtues of one drachm of the Root, Herb or Bark. But our experiments have proven that one pound of 
menstruum in the form of an Elixir will hold in perfect solution the medicinal properties of one half a pound of the 
Vegetable ; but when a larger proportion is used the excess will almost invariably be found injthe bottom of the bottle. 
We, therefore, otTer these Elixirs to the profession, and earnestly desire a trial in their practice, knowing that they 
will contain just what we represent them to contain, in perfect solution, with their nauseous properties to a great 
extent disguised. ^ „, .. 

They will be furnished at one-half the ordinary market price of Fluid Extracts, although many of the Fluid 
Extracts In the market are not equal to these Elixirs in strength. Our present list embraces the following: 

Selibrile Elix. Poke Root. 

do Poplar Bark. 



Selibrile Elix. Anconite Root. 1 


do 


Black Cohosh. 


do 


Black Comp. 


do 


Blackberry Root. 


do 


Belladona. 


<lo 


Bitter Sweet. 


do 


Blood Root. 


do 


Blue Flag. 


do 


Boneset. 


do 


Buchu. 


do 


Buchu and Pareira 




Brava. 


do 


Burdock. 


do 


Butternut. 


do 


Catnip. 


do 


Chamomile. 


do 


Colchicum Root. 


do 


Columbo. 


do 


Comfrey. 


do 


Conium. 


no 


Cotton Root. 


do 


Cramp Bark. 


do 


Coltsfoot. 


do 


Cubebs. 


do 


Culvers Root. 


do 


Dandelion Boot. 


do 


Digitalis. 1 



eEIi 
do 


X. Elecampane. 
Ergot. 


do 


Gelseminum. 


do 


Gentian. 


do 


Ginger. 


do 


Golden Seal. 


do 


Helonias Root Comp. 


do 


Henbanf!. 


do 


Hoarhound. 


do 


Ipecac. 


do 


Jalap. 


do 


Juniper Berries. 


do 


Lady Slipper. 


do 


Lettuce. 


do 


Lobeila. 


do 


Lobelia Comp. 


do 


Male Fern. 


do 


Mandrake. 


do 


Matico, 


do 


Nux Vomica. 


do 


Orange Peel. 


do 


Pareira Brava. 


do 


Piuk Root. 


do 


Pink Root and Beuna, 


do 


Pipsissewa. 


do 


Pleurisy Root. 



do 


Prickly Ash. 


do 


Quassia. 


do 


Rhatauy. 


do 


Sarsaparilla. 


do 


Sarsaparilla Comp 


do 


t-eneca. 


do 


Senna. 


do 


Senna Comp. 


do 


SnakoRoot. 


do 


Squills. 


do 


Squills Comp. 


do 


Stillingia. 


do 


Stillingia Comp. 


do 


Stramonium. 


do 


Tansey. 


do 


Turkey Corn. 


do 


Unicorn. 


do 


Uva Ursi. 


do 


Valerian. 


do 


Water Pepper. 


do 


White Oak. 


do 


Witch Hazel. 


do 


Wormseed. 


do 


Yellow Dock. 



E'ixir Matico Comp.— We offer this preparation as a reliable and efficient remedy in Gonorrhoea, BlsnorrUoeaj an<^ 
otbor diseases of the urinary organs. 

PEPSIN AND 

PANCREATINE ^REPARATIONS. 

We should not offer such an extensive list of these preparations to the profession had we not experimentally 
proved that they are most valuable Therapeutic agents; and. therefore, feel confident in asserting that when they 
have been prescribed, where indicated, with unsatisfactory results, they must have contained a very small proportion 
of Pepsin or Pancreatine to a large proportion of Starch. Pepsin and Pancreatine being glutinous substances, it is 
necessary to unite them with Starch or Malt in order to present them in the form of powder. Physicians should, 
therefore, be cautious as to whose preparation they prescribe, as it is a very easy matter to use a large proportion of 
Starch or Malt to a small proportion of Pepsin or Pancreatine. 

It is very evident that if these preparations will digest food artificially they will assist digestion when taken into 
the stomach, and thus remove the strain upon those productive organs and give nature time to recuperate. It hag been 
established beyond a doubt that the ollice of Pepsin is to digest the more solid portions of food, and Pancreatine the 
oily and fatty substances. 

We do not think there are any medicinal agents that can bs administered with more certainty than Pepgin and 
Pancreatine, when pure. 

Pepsin Powder.— Containine pure Pepsin, with the addition of sutBcient Starch to represent it in the form of a 
powder, and a small proportion of Lactic Acid. It will digest from four to six times its weight. It is manu- 
factured with the greatest care and attention.^ from the stomach of the pig. Dose— ten to fifteen grains before each 
meal. 

Elixir Pepsin, Strycliina and Eismuth.— It has proved to be. In most forms of Dyspepsia, the best remedy ever 
produced. Each ounce contains forty grains Pepsin, 8-75 of a grain of Strychnia. Dose — one teuspoonful 
immediately before meals. 

Elixir Pepsin and Bismuth.— Used with great success in Dysentery, Diarrhcea, Vomiting In Pregnancy, and 
derangement of the Digestive Organs. Each ounce contains forty grains Pepsin and eight grains Ammonio- 
Citrate of Bismuth. Dose — from one to two leaspoonfuls. 

Syrup of Pepsin. — One of the best forms of administering Pepsin to Children. Each ounce contains forty grains of 
Pepsin. Do3e — for an adult, from a dessert to a teaspoouful ; children in proportion. 

WINE OF PEPSIN.— We use pure Pepsin, instead of macerating the stomach in wine, and can, therefore, offer * 
preparation inoffensive to the palate. Used in Dyspepsia attended with Debility. Each ounce contains ten grains 
of pure and frezhly repared Pepsin, with Sherry SVine. Dose — half a wine glassful. 

PANCREATINE POWDER.— Pancreatine is secreted by the Pancreas, and is the principle that digests oils and fats, 
and is, therefore, superior to Pepsin In many Dyspeptic cases. In a large class of cases they should be adniiuis- 
tcred t"gether. When administered with Cod Liver Oil the oil will almost invariably agree with the stomach. 
Dose— from five to fifteen grains. 

KLIXIR PEPSIN, PANCREATINE AND BISMUTH.— One of the most valuable preparations In the various forms of 
Dyspepsia, and in Pulmonary affections, where Cod Liver Oil Is used, as the Pancreatine assists in digesting tha 
Oil. Each ounce contains thirty-two grains Pepsin, thirty-two grains Pancreatine, and eight grains Ammonlo- 
Citrate of Bismuth. Dose — one to two teaspoonfuls. 

ELIXIR PEPSIN, STRYCHNIA AND BISMUTH, WILH PANCREATINE.— Particularly applicable In cases of Dya- 
pf-psia, when the stomach is incapable of digesting oily or fatty substances, as well as the more solid substances 
of food. Each ounce contains forty grains Pepsin, 8-75 of a grain of Strychnia, eight grains of Ammonio-Citrate 
of Bismuth, and forty grains Pancreatine. Dose — one teaspoouful . 

TROCHES OF PEPSIN AND PANCREATINE.— One of the best forms for administering Pepsin with Pancreatine, and 
will be found very valuable in cases of Indigestion, Gastralgia, Gastrodynia, Pyrosis, Heartburn, Flatulency 
and especially when there is inability to digest oils, Ac. Each Troche containing two grains of pnre Pepsin' 
and two graina Pancreatine, with Lactic Acid. Dose— from two to three Troches. ' 



/ 



SHARP & DOHME, 

MmUFiCTURillG CII[MISTS & PHlflMlCim 

b^il,ti:is^o:e?.ei, 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL THE OFFICINAL AND OTHER STANDARD 

And various ELIXIRS and SPECIAL PREPARATIONS, much esteemed and 
in general use among the Medical Profession of our city and elsewhere. 

^ Catalogues, giving exact composition, medical properties, &c., of all our 
Preparations, mailed on application. 



OTTO «& REYNDERS, 

64 f HATKAffl STRUT, HIW ¥®EK, 

J^^ Manufacturers and Importers of 

Surgical yritiopffidical 

INSTRUMENTS, 

Apparatus for Local An-- 

wsthesia and for Atom- 

ization of Liquids. 

Laryngoscofes, 

Ophthalmoscopes^ 
Hypodermic Syringes, 

Hip-Joint Splints, 
Skeletons, Trusses, 

Elastic Stockings.. 

Casellis and other Anilla Ther- 
mometers, Seatangle Tents, etc., etc. 

The latest improvements and new 
inventions always on hand and re- 
ceived constantly from our Agents 
in Europe. 

FRANCIS ARNTOLD, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

IVo. IS S. SliA.IM» STItEET, 

HAEalTIMOiaiEa MM. 

at?- A full stock of TRUSSES, BANDAGES and MECHANICAL APPARATUS for 
CORRECTING ALL DEFORMITIES of the BODY, on hand and made to order. 







the: baleTimorx: 



S. W. COR. LOMBARD AND GREEN STREETS, 

Estahlished hy the 3Iedical Faculty of the University 

of Maryland. 



Persons suffering from any of tlic Diseases incident to the Eye 
or Eaw will find it to their advantage to seek the conveniences offered 
l)v this Institution for the treatment of these special diseases. 

Expenses of Board, Nursing aifd Medicines, in private wards, 
(per week,) $5.00 ; in private chandlers, (per week,) $7.00 to $20.00. 
For charity patients medical attendance and operations performed 
upon the Eve and Ear are included in the price charged for board. 

I- ■ 

I THE BULTIMOfiE fREt EIE Hi EAR OlSfENSIIRI 

-Connected with tlie Infirmary, is a free Dispensary, which is o\yQ\\ 
W every day at 12^ o'clock, (Sundays excepted,) for the treat- 
P ment of patients suffering from Eye and Ear Diseases. 

ATTENDANCE AND MEDICINES TO THE POOR FREE OF CHARGE. 

Prof. J. J. CHISOLM, M. D., 

Surgeon in charge. 






^^^9 



ALSO THE 



llIVlRilf 1 lii Ml A% 

S. W. Corner Green and Lombard Streets, 




I I Prof. C. JOHNSTON, M. JD. 



I I 



** J. J. CHISOLAI. M. n. 



Prof. R. laeSHERRTfM.JD. 

" s. c. ciiEjr, M. n. 

" F. DONALDSON, M. D. 
" TF. T. JIOirARD,M.D. 
" FT. MILES. M. D. 



Is constantly open for the reception and care of the sick. The patients j 
are attended by the Professors of the University. A portion of the \ 
building contains commodious private apartments and comfortable ; 
chambers. Persons from a distance requiring surgical treatment, or j 
operations^ will find the Institution admirably adapted to this pur- | 
pose, as exclusive of the daily visits of the Professors, there is a resident I 
surgeon always in the house. I 

Board, including medicines and nursing, in public ward, $5.00 per | 
week. In private apartments, $7.00 to 20.00 per week. Medical and 
surgical attendance, including operations, gratuitous to all charity patients. 

MEDICAL OFFICERS AT INFIRMABY. 



Application for admission may be made to Dr. J. S. Conrad, 
Eesident Physician, or to J. J. Chisolm, M. D., Dean of the Faculty. 




Sixty-Fourth Annual Circular 



OF THE 




N. E. cor. Lombard and Qreen Streets, Baltimore, Md. 
SESSION 1871-72. 




PRINTED BY KELLY, PIET AND COMPANY, 

I'uixTERS, Booksellers and Stationers, lU Baltimore St. 




MDCCCLXXI. 



5. W. COR. GREEN AND LOMBARD STREETS. 

Established by and under the immediate control of the Professors of the University 

of Maryland. 



Open Every Day at 12 J o'clock, P. M. {Sundays Excepted), 



IJreaftttettt of f tierg lind o^ lisease di[ 1 ecid(^t 



Medical Attendance and Medicines Free of Charge. 



The Professors of the University are present every day to treat 
such sick persons as present themselves. 

Poor women will be attended to at their homes during their con- 
finements, by the Dispensary Physicians, free of charge, if application 
be made at the Dispensary. 



Surgeon in Charge— Prof. C. JOHNSTON, M. D. 



Physicians in Charge— Prof. R. McSHERRY, M. D., and Prof. S. C. CHEW, M. D. 



Fop Chest and Throat Affections-Prof. F. DONALDSON, M. D. 



For Diseases of Women and Children-Prof. W. T. HOWARD, M. D. 



For Eye and Ear Diseases— Prof. J. J. CHISOLM, M. D. 



For Diseases of the Nervous System— Prof. F. T. MILES, M. D. 



Dispensary Physicians-A.E. STEIN, M.D., E.F.WALKER, M.D.,W.W.WHITE,M.D. 



UNIVERSITY OF MmLAND. 



ISTT^FO^aiTSa 



J^lSTlSTTTJtJILj OIK.OTJI-.^I?. 



m 



9 





I ■■« 



Ilia m 




^ % 




^. '^.^'.. ^4^%"^! 



SESSION 1871-72, 



€^TM'E^oewE FomMmsMiQA^ 187&-^i^ 



§attimovc : 

KELLY, PIET AND COMPANY. 
174 Baltimore Street. 



MDCCCLXXI. 



Hon, SEVEEN TEAOKLE WALLIS, LL.D., ProTOst. 



WILLIAM E. A. AIKIN, M. D. LL.D. 

PKOFESSOK of CUEMISTKY AXD rilARMACY. 

GEORGE W. MILTENBERGER, M. D., 

Pr.OFESSOR OF Obstetrics. 

RICHARD McSHERRY, M. D., 

Pkofessok of Peinciples and Practice of Medicine. 

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSTON, M. D., 

Pkofessok of Suegeey. 

SAMUEL C. CHEW, M. D., 

Peofessoe of Materia Medica and T^EEAPE^;T^ci^, 

A>-D 

Clinical Medicine. 

FRANK DONALDSON, M. D., 

Pkofessok of Physiology and Hygiene, 

AND 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Turoat, Lungs and Heart. 

WILLIAM T. HOWARD, M. D., 

Professor of Diseases of "Wojien and Children and Clinical Medicine. 

JULIAN J. CHISOLM, M. D., 

Professor of Operative Scegery, 

AKD 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

FRANCIS T. MILES, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy, 

AND 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System. 

L. McLANE TIFFANY, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

JOHN N. MONMONIER, M.D., 

Prosector t6 the Profes-or of Anatomy. 

JULIAN eJ. CHISOLM, M, B., Bean of the laciilffj. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 




SESSIOlSr 18'71-="7S. 



The Sixty-Fourth Annual Session of the School of Medicine 
in the University of Maryland will commence on Monday, the 
2d of October, 1871, and will terminate about the 1st March, 
1872. 

The University of Maryland is a Southern Institution, de- 
pendent for patronage chiefly upon the South. Besides the 
usual numbers from Maryland and Virginia, there were, during 
the last session, students frona every State, with a single excep- 
tion, from Dela^vare to Texas, making a very large increase in 
the medical class over that of the preceding session. The 
University of Maryland is intimately connected with the future 
of the great southern country. Baltimore has now become a 
very large city, its population having been greatly increased 
since the close of the late war, principally from the Southern 
States, and must soon be regarded as the centre of medical 
instruction for southern students. All the members of the 
Faculty of the University belong to Maryland, Virginia, 
North and South Carolina. 

The Medical Department of the University of Maryland, 
one of the oldest and best organized schools of the country, com- 
mands all the means and appliances in use at the present time 
for giving a complete Course of Medical Instruction, with nu- 
merous preparations and elaborate diagrams to elucidate all the 
points pertaining to the many branches taught in the College. 
In the plan of instruction adopted by this Institution, Clinical 
Teaching constitutes a most important feature. The great 



facilities possessed by the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity enable the Professors daily to elucidate upon living 
subjects^ the diseases and accidents treated of in the Didactic 
Lectures. The Faculty of the University of Maryland pos- 
sess a General Hospital, in the wards of which are always 
found cases of great interest. The contiguity of this Hospital 
to the College Buildings, the width of the street only separating 
the two Institutions, enables all of the students to attend the Clin- 
ical Instruction without loss of time incurred in visiting distant 
Hospitals, as experienced by students in some other large cities 
where the Hospital and the School may be separated by long 
distances. These Clinics are held daily by the Professors of the 
University, both at the bedside, in the Clinical Amphitheatre, 
and in the Dispensary. 

CLINICAL LECTURES. 

During the year, and more especially during the Session of 
the College, Clinical Lectures will Idc delivered daily (Sun- 
days excepted) at 1 o'clock : 

Monday — Surgical Clinic, ^v'ith special attention to the Dis- 
eases of the Urinary Organs, by Prof Johnston. 

Tuesday — Medical Clinic, by Profs. McSherry and Chew. 

Wednesday — Throat and Chest Clinic, with the use of the 
stethoscope, laryngoscope and rhinoscope, by Prof. Donaldson. 

Thursday — Clinic on Diseases of Women and Children, by 
Prof Howard. 

Friday — Clinic on Eye and Ear Diseases, with the uses of the 
ophthalmoscope and otoscope, by Prof. Chisolm. 

Saturday — Clinic on Diseases of the Nervous System, and 
tlie proper modes of applying electricity, by Prof Miles. 

In Baltimore, as in other large cities, the extremes of afflu- 
ence and poverty are found. From its large number of work- 
ing people thousands seek professional aid from the many Hos- 
pitals, Asylums and Dispensaries established by private and 
pn])lic charity. Among the institutions of the city are : 



5 

The Baltimore Infirmary or University Hospital^ the property 
of and under the exclusive control of the Faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, a General Hospital, complete in all its 
appointments, in which every provision is made with special 
reference to Clinical Teaching. In this building is an operating 
Amphitheatre, easy of access from the wards, in which the 
Clinical Lectures are delivered. This Hospital being the 
Marine Hospital in which all sailors coming to the Port 
of Baltimore are treated when sick, always contains in its 
wards a large number of patients, representing the diseases 
of all parts of the globe. Adjoining the Hospital the Faculty 
have recently erected a commodious building, wdth accommo- 
dations for twenty-four resident students. To these resident 
students are assigned wards in the Hospital, and the attendance 
of the sick under the daily supervision of the Professors of the 
University. In this Institution under-graduates are permitted 
to enjoy the very great advantage of being in constant attend- 
ance upon the sick, and of receiving daily, at the bedside, in- 
struction from the Professors. Those who reside in the Hos- 
pital for twelve months, from the advantages which they enjoy, 
should become familiar with the practice of Medicine and Sur- 
gery. 

The Maryland Free Dispensary is under the immediate and 
sole control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland. 
At this Institution thousands annually apply for professional 
treatment, and from these much valuable Clinical material is 
obtained. For the purposes of this Dispensary the Infirmary 
building is used, so that all interesting cases may be transferred 
to the Amphitheatre for Clinical instruction. 

The Baltimore Eye and Ear Infirmai^y and Dispensary y the 
largest special charity in the City of Baltimore, was established 
for the special purpose of instructing the students of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in the study of Eye and Ear diseases. ' 
The advantages which this Institution offers to the sick suffer- 
ing from these maladies, attract such numbers as to make this 
an excellent school for studying these specialties. Clinical in- 



struction is regularly given from the abundant material at 
liand, and students will have constant opportunities of seeing 
the many interesting operations for the restoration of sight and 
hearing, as well as to study the course of treatment necessary 
for the relief of the diseases which affect the eye and ear. ^-^^^ 

The Bay-Vieiu Hospital, not connected immediately with 
medical schools, is a magnificent establishment recently erected 
by the city of Baltimore, and is one of the largest public 
Hospitals in America. In the numerous wards of this Insti- 
tution every species of disease is seen. This valuable In- 
stitution offers special advantages for studying diseases at the 
bedside. A number of gentlemen, immediately after their 
graduation in medicine from the University, are received in 
this Hospital as resident students. Connected with the estab- 
lishment are ^^ Lying-in Wards,'' in which the resident students 
have every facility for obtaining individual experience in the 
practice of Obstetrics. 

It will thus be seen that students who attend the Course of 
Lectures in the University of Maryland, will enjoy rare oppor- 
timities for clinical study. 

The Course of Instruction in the several departments is 
comprised in the following schedule : 

Pkof. ^yM. E. A. AiKix, M. D. 

The course will include a notice of those molecular forces 
which are active in all chemical changes ; the nomenclature of 
the science ; the use of chemical symbols as the written lan- 
guage of chemistry ; the laws of combination ; the properties 
of such elements and compounds as have any practical interest 
for the physician; the reactions of the pharmaceutical pro- 
cesses of the pharmacopoeia, the applications of the science to 
toxicology and the chemistry of organic bodies, so far as this 
can throw any light upon the functions of the human system 
in health or disease. For these purposes the apparatus in this 



department furnishes facilities not surpas'sed, if equalled any- 
where. And as the science can only be successfully taught by 
the aid of experimental illustrations, these will be constantly 
employed to make the lectures instructive and impressive. 



Prof. George W. ]\Iiltenberger, M. D. 

In this department the science of Obstetrics is taught in 
as practical a manner as possible. This is accomplished by 
taking up the consideration of labor as soon as the student is 
prepared for it by an acquaintance with the Anatomy and 
Physiology of the organs which are concerned in it, and with 
the foetus in its relations to pregnancy and parturition. The 
Course is illustrated by numerous drawings of large size, by 
models, and by the manikin. 

Prof. Eiciiard McSherry, M. D. 

Upon this important branch, it is the aim of the Professor 
to make the generally received facts of modern medicine clear 
and intelligible to the mind of the student. In the didactic 
lectures, the best founded theories are briefly presented, but 
elaborate discussions of theories are avoided. The course of 
instruction delivered in the College halls finds immediate ap- 
plication and illustration in the wards of the University Hos- 
pital, so that theory and practice are brought to bear simulta- 
neously in the education of the classes. The student thus 
enjoys the inestimable advantage of seeing nearly every disease 
under treatment which he hears of in the lecture room, or reads 
of in the text-books- 



Prof. C. Johnston, M. D. 

The Professor of Surgery proposes to make his course prac- 
tical and as comprehensive as possible, in view of the present 
advanced and progressive state of the art and science. 



For the acxjomplishmeut of these ends, he will devote a por- 
tion of his hours to a didactic exposition of the great princi- 
ples which must form the basis as well of study as of practice ; 
while the more considerable part will be occupied with clinical 
teaching, the indispensable and sure guide of the medical student. 

As the surgical practice of the University Hospital devolves 
upon the Professor of Surgery during the months of the ses- 
sion, and as the out-door Dispensary furnishes him throughout 
the year with numerous cases of interest, it will be always pos- 
sible to derive from these institutions such ample supply of 
material for clinical purposes as will render illustration of the 
principles profitable, and of the practice attractive. Besides 
these resources, the Professor will be able from time to time to 
exhibit instructive forms of disease drawn from his private 
practice; and all surgical operations during the session will be 
performed by the Professor of Surgery before the class, unless 
in cases of emergency occurring at unseasonable hours. Among 
the eminently practical procedures may be mentioned catheter- 
ism and other operations upon the genito-urinary organs. 

The course will be illustrated by casts, drawings and prepa- 
rations. 

Prof. S. C. Chew, M. D. 

l\\ this department special attention is bestowed upon the 
application of remedies in the treatment of disease, the indica- 
tions for their use, the effects of medicines, and their modes of 
action. These subjects, constituting the science of Therapeu- 
tics, are regarded as the most important topics assigned to the 
chair. 

The instruction given in the lectures is practically applied 
at the medical clinic connected with the department. 

The lectures on Materia Medica are amply illustrated with a 
cabinet of specimens of the various substances described, which 
are submitted to the examination of the class ; and with an 
extensive collection of colored engravings of medical plants, 
bj)th indigenous and exotic. 



Prof. Frank Donaldson, M. D. 

The lectures on Physiology will be of a thoroughly practical 
character; such points will be insisted upon as have been most 
clearly demonstrated by the researches of experimental physi- 
ologists. 

The course Avill be illustrated by numerous plates and draw- 
ings, most of which have been copied by photography, and en- 
larged, from the works of the most approved authors. The 
students are taught that modern Physiology is not an isolated 
science, but one having a direct bearing ujjon practical medi- 
cine, and, in fact, the foundation of rational medicine. Its 
study will, therefore, be urged upon them as of paramount 
importance. 

Hygiene will form a prominent part in the instruction, and 
the attention of students will l)e called to the importance of 
due regard being always paid to the olservance of hygienic 
and sanitary laws in the preservation of health and in the treat- 
ment of disease. 

Pathological Anatomy. — There will be one lecture eveiy 
week, occupied j)rincipally with the demonstrations of morbid 
anatomy, of which ample material is collected from the hos- 
pitals and dispensaries of the city. In this way the student 
will have opportunities of becoming familiar with the patho- 
logical lesions of a large number of diseases. 

Prof. W. T. Howard, M. D. 

The University of Maryland, it is believed, was the first 
Institution in this country to recognize the importance of es- 
tablishing a chair specially devoted to the study of the diseases 
of Women and Children. As usually embraced in Medical 
Schools in the chair of Obstetrics, it is well known that this 
amounts practically to a mere nullity. 



10 

The diseases of Infants and Children v/ill be first investi- 
gated. Preliminary lectures will be given on the peculiarities 
of organization and function incident to the periods of infancy 
and childhood, and the laws of Pathology, Hygiene and Thera- 
peutics specially applicable to them. Next will follow lectures 
upon Diagnosis and Prognosis, and lastly, individual diseases 
will be carefully studied. 

The course upon the diseases of Women will commence with 
the surgical anatomy of the generative organs, and the methods 
of uterine diagnosis. The various diseases and displacements 
of the uterus will be illustrated by accurate drawings and 
models, and the recent operations in uterine surgery will be 
clearly demonstrated. 

As far as possible, the doctrines taught in the didactic lec- 
tures will be illustrated and enforced at the clinic. 

Pkof. J. J. Chlsol^[, M. D. 

It is w^ll known by those who have followed a course of 
instruction in Medical Colleges in which there is but one Pro- 
fessor of Surgery, that the operations upon the dead body are 
crowded into a few lectures during the last weeks of the ses- 
sion, and must, from necessity, be so raj)idly exhibited that 
very little instruction can be derived from seeing them per- 
formed. In the University of Maryland, the chair of Opera- 
tive Surgery w^as established so that, in the five full months 
allotted to this part of the work, students may make themselves 
familiar with all the operations necessary for the removal of 
incurable diseases and injuries, or the correction of deformities. 
All the operations in Surgery are slowly and methodically per- 
formed, and every step of each operation carefully and clearly 
explained. Any student who pays attention to these demonstra- 
tive lectures, must become familiar with the uses of instruments 
and the various modes of procedure in all surgical operations, 
and should therefore feel himself fully competent to perform 
such operations when required in practice. 



11 



Pkof. Francis T. Miles, M. D. 

Anatomy will be taught in the most practical manner possi- 
ble. The lectures upon this fundamental branch of medical 
learning will be amply illustrated with preparations, models, 
plates, drawings, and the dissected cadaver. 

An abundant supply of material insures to the attentive stu- 
dent an opportunity for the apprehension of the principles and 
the facts of descriptive and surgical anatomy, an appreciation 
indispensable to the clinical student and tlie medical or surgi- 
cal practitioner. 

L. McL. Tiffany, M. D. 

The Dissecting Room is in charge of the Demonstrator, who 
superintends and directs the classes in their dissections. Ana- 
tomical material is abundant and furnished at a moderate ex- 
pense. The rooms are convenient, well warmed, ventilated, 
and lighted. The Demonstrator passes much of his time in 
assisting the students and in guiding their labors. Access may 
be had to the rooms at all hours of the day, until 10 o'clock 
P. M., when "thev are closed for the ni^ht. 

During the Session of the College, students are carefully ex- 
amined by members of the profession, who form the Quiz 
Classes. The object of this kind of instruction is to explain all 
points in the regular lectures Avhich students may not have 
clearly understood. The better to ascertain their proficiency, 
they are individually catechised upon the lectures of the day, 
and their erroneous and defective responses corrected. This is 
a very valuable method of instruction, to which the attention 
of students should be prominently draw^n. 



12 



The Faculty of the University of Maryland would call the 
attention of Physicians to the advantages which they possess 
for the treatment of private patients, at their private Infirmary, 
which is delightfully located, with a resident physician of expe- 
rience always in the house. It is well known that patients 
from a distance, who are compelled to live in hotels whilst they 
are being treated, more especially those requiring surgical ope- 
rations, are forced to endure many annoying discomforts, and 
find the extras which their condition necessitates very expen- 
sive. AYhere serious surgical operations are required, this pri- 
vate Hospital, with its good nursing, offers peculiar advantages. 

The charges for Board and Lodging, including nursing and 
medicines, are from $7 to $20 per week, depending upon the 
size and character of the chambers selected. In this Institu- 
tion patients have every comfort at about one-half the cost of 
board in hotels. The charges for surgical and medical attend- 
ance are in accordance with the fee table of the Baltimore 
Medical Association. 

For further information apply to 

J. J. CHISOLM, M. D., Dean of Faculty, 

64 Franklin Street, Baltimore. 



SESSIOIN* 1870-71- 



Natne, Res hit' tic e. Preceptors. 

1 Albert, M. C Maryland Prof. N. II. Smith and Dr. A. Smith. 

2 Aldridge, L. a Maryland Dr. J. T. Sim. 

8 Alstox, W. M.D North CaroZi/ja.. University of Maryland. 

4 Ambler, J. M., M.D. .Firjci/iia University of Maryland. 

5 Arthur, W. S Maryland Dr. Taneyhill. 

6 Baldwin, C. A Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

7 Baltzell, F. E Maryland Profs. Cliisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

8 Bellerman, C. F,... Maryland University of Maryland. 

9 Bensox, C. W., M.D..2faryland Practitioner. 

10 Bevax, C. F Maryland Prof. N. R. Smith and Dr. A. Smith. 

11 Boone, \V. C Maryland University of Maryland. 

12 BowKX, W. B Virginia Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

13 Bowie, J. F Virginia. .t. ....Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

14 Boyleston, W. a . . . . Louisiana University of Maryland. 

15 Bra wner, J. B Maryland Dr. R. H. Tuft. 

16 Bromwell, J. R Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

17 Buck, W. H. L Maryland Dr. H. P. C. Wilson. 

18 Campbell, B., M.'D..Pennsylvania .... 

19 Carper, A. J Virginia University of Maryland. 

2) Carroll, J. G Virginia Dr. Watson 

21 Carroll.W. K 3Iaryland University of Maryland. 

22 Caulk, VV., M.D Maryland 

23 Chamberlaine.H.R J/a?N/^an(Z Dr. Bordley. 

24 Chapman, N Maryland Dr. Chapman. 

25 Chapman, P., M.D.. ..Maryland 

20 Clarke, A. P ...Maryland Prof. N. R. Smith and Dr. A. Smith. 

27 Clawson, J. H South Carolina...'Drs. Barron and Bratton. 

2S CocKRiLL, J. M Maryland Dr. Cockrill. 

29 CoLLiNSON, J Maryland Dr. Bird. 

30 Conrad, J. S., 'M.D...Ma7-yland Baltimore Infirmary. 

31 Corse, W. J., Jr Mai-yland Profs. Chisolm and Miles. 

32 Crim, J., M.D Maryland University of Maryland. 

33 Dawson, J. T Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

34 Devilbis, D. M Mai-yland Dr. T. W. Simpson. 

35 Diller, C. H Maryland Dr. D. E. Stone. 

36 Du BosE, H. C South Ca;-o?ina.. University of MarylanJ. 

37 Duke, A. C South Carolina...Frofs. Chisolm, ]SIiles and De Rosset. 

as Duke, J., M.D Maryland 

39 Englar, J. W., ^I. D.Maryland University of Maryland. 



14 



Xame. 



liesideuce. 



Frecejytors, 



ESTES, C. C Soidh Carolina.. ,Drs. Larkins and Meador. 

Farrell, J. D. D . . . . Maryland 

Ferebee.N. M North Carolina. ."PtoU. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Fox, A. C North Carolina..T)T. Fox. 

FCTRMAX, J. F., M.D..iStou77i Carolina... 

George, E Maryland Dr. V. Straughn. 

Green, G. F Georgia Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Gregg, H.W .Virc/inia Dr. Luck. 

Gronan, H. W Maryland Drs. Dwinelle and Wilkins. 

Gross, H. B Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Harker, J. F Maryland, Prof. J. R. W. Dunbar. 

Harki>'S, J. AV Maryland University of Maryland. 

Harmox, G. E Delaware Drs. Flint and Allen, U. S. Navy. 

Harper, C. W. M.D..Maryla7id University of Maryland. 

Hexdrix,H. A.,M.D,Jn(:7ia?nia 

Hicks, J. F., M.D — Tennessee 

Hill, J. S Alabama Dr. F. H. Anderson. 

Hill, T. L Maryland Dr. W. W. Wilson, 

HOEN, A. G Maryland 

Hoffman, G. H.,M.D. IF. Virginia 

HOSKINS, J. R. B Virginia Dr. Hoskins. 

Howard, J. Mc.M.D.3/a?7/?a?2c? 

Howell, T. P Chicasaw JVa^io7iUniversity of Maryland. 

HuLTZ, R. M Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De 

HuMRiCHOCSE, J. \^^.Maryland Dr. Wise. 

James, W. H Virginia Drs. Plaster and Van Devents. 

Jaeger, W. R Maryland.., Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De 

Jay, J. G Maryland Profs- Chisolm, Miles and De 

Johnson, J. A Mai-yland Prof. McSherry. 

Jones, F. E Mississippi Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De 

Jones, G. P., M.D Maryland 

Jones, J. N Georgia Dr. Crim. 

Jones, P Maryland Dr. Morris. 

Jones, W. A Maryland Dr. T. Z. Offutt. 

Jordan, J. W. S Maryland' Dr. C. H. Jones. 

Keech, J. O Pennsylvania. ..Dr. M. Griffith. 

Keedy, S. H., M.D.... if. Virginia 

Keen, S. B Virginia Dr. Hoye. 

Keisler, M. B Soidh Carolina...'Dr. J. Caughman. 

Keller, B. T Maryland Dr. B. A. Dougherty. 

Kemp, W. F. A Maryland Dr. W. M. Kemp. 

King, G Maryland University of Maryland. 

Kirby, T. E., 'M.D. ...Mary land 

Kloman, W. C, M.B. Maryland Practitioner. 

Klueber, C. J Maryland Dr. E. A. Stein. 

Knight, L. W., 'M.D.Mai-yland Dr. Knight. 

Krise, C. W Pennsylvania... Frof^. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

LANDSDALE,B.G.,MDJ/a?-2/Za?i(/ 

Lewis, R. H North Ca7-olina..Frofs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

LiSH, A. R. J Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Lyon, S. H Maryland University of Maryland. 

Massey, J. E South Carolina...Frofs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

Masson, W. H Maryland Dr. J. N. Monmonier. 

Maxwell, W. S Maryland Dr. Maxwell. 



Rosset. 



Rosset. 
Rosset. 



J 



15 

Name. Jtesidence. Preceittors. 

91 McCall, J. W Louisiana Dr. L. McL. Tiffany. 

95 McCleary, J. R Virginia University of Maryland. 

96 McCoRMiCK, C A.... Mary land .Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

97 McIntosh, J., 'M.D... South Carolina... 

98 McKexsie, a. H South Carolina. ..Drs. Barron and lirattou. 

99 McSherry, H. C Mart/land Prof. R. McSlierry. 

100 McVVehrley, T Pennsylvania University of Maryland. 

101 Miller, C. E., M.B.. Maryland Practitioner. 

102 MoNKUR, C. J. S Maryland Prof. F. Donaldson. 

103 MooRE, J. H Virginia Dr. J. Taylor. 

104 Murray, J. M Maryland:. Prof. F, Donaldson. 

105 Murphy, P. L North Carolina. .Vrofs. ChLsolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

106 NoRBis, G. W Maryland Dr. J. B. Norris. 

107 NoRRis, W. W Maryland Prof. F. Donaldson. 

108 O'Neal, AV Pennsylvania ....Vroi?., Chisohn, Miles and De Rosset. 

109 Page, W. H Georgia University of Maryland. 

110 Pape, G. W Maryland Profs. Chisolm and Miles. 

111 Parker, A. E Maryland Prof. J. R. W. Dunbar. 

112 Parker, M. C South Carolina.. .Dv. T. Evans. 

113 Parvis, W. W Delaware University of Maryland . 

114 Pearson, F. W Maryland Profs. Chisolm and Mile«. 

115 Peed, J. S Maryland Dr. Stevenson. 

116 Peek, W. W Georgia University of Maryland. 

117 Pennington, J. L.. . .Maryland Practitioner. 

118 Pendleton, E Virginia ... ....Frof^. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

119 Perkins, G. T Maryland Prof. F. Donaldson. 

120 Petty, R. A Alabama Dr. G. D. Norris. 

121 Piping, W.C Maryland 

122 Powell, J. L., M.D.. Virginia ..^ 

123 Powell, S. F., M D.. Maryland 

12i Ray, H. J Mississippi Dr. W. M. Stausbury. 

125 Rehberger, J. H... .Maryland Profs. Chisolm and Miles. 

126 Reinhart, D. J Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

127 RoHE, G. H Maryland 

J28 Russell, A. W., '^l.DMaryland 

129 Salley, M. G.. , South Carol ina...T>r. A. S- Salley. 

130 Seldner, S. W Maryland Dr. J. Morris. 

131 SELL3IAN, W. A. B... Maryland Prof. N". R. Smith. 

132 Shipley, D. :sicG.... Maryland Dr. E. M. Reid. 

133 Sims, L. V South Caroli7ia...I>r. J. Furman. 

134 SiNZ, E Maryland Dr. Moore. 

135 Skinner, T. H Tennessee University of Maryland. 

136 Smith, J. T Maryland Profs. Chisolm and Miles. 

137 Spalding. C. S Indlanna 

138 Stansbury.G.W. MDJ/ar^^anrf Practitioner. 

139 Stansbury, O., Mississippi Dr. D. M. Stansbury. 

140 Stansbury, J.T., l/i.. J) Maryland Practitioner. 

141 Stansell, J. McQ. ..iVor^/i C«ro;t?ia..Dr. Stansel. 

142 Stone, C. G Maryland Profs. Cbisolm and Miles. 

143 Stone, I. S Maryland Dr. D. E. Stone. 

144 Streett, C. H Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

145 Taneyhill, G.lj.,'M\iMaryland .Practitioner. 

146 Taylor, M Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset, 

147 Thomas, G.G North Carolina. .Vroi%. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 



16 

Xatne. llesidence. J'veceptors. 

H8 Tinges, A. S...., Maryland Prof. F. Donaldson. 

149 Tongue, H Maryland Profs. Chipolm, Miles and De Rosset, 

150 ToRRENCE, Z.M.y'M.iy. North Carolina.. Dr. Holland- 

151 Van Bibber, S.V.... Mary land Dr. C. Van Bibber. 

152 Wai>ker,H ,.... South Carolina...Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

153 Wallace, G. M Virginia Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

154 Ware, H. F Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

i55 Warner, F. A Maryland Prof. U. McSherry. 

1;56 VVarfield, J.H., ^l.TiMaryland 

157 W^ARREN, E. P.. M.B. Pennsylvania 

158 Waters, C. H Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

159 Watson, J. A South Carolina...T>T. Hickley. 

160 Watson, A. G Virginia Dr. Watson, 

161 W^ ATKINS, W. C, l,\. 'D.Mary land 

162 Wayson, W. A. N.. . .Maryland Dr. Wayson. 

163 White, W.W., M.D..Maryland Baltimore Dispensary. 

164 Wiley, W.W Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset 

165 Williams, 'E.,'^\.X)... Maryland 

166 WiLKiNS, G. L.. Isl. D.Mary land Practitioner. 

167 WiLKiNS, J., ^l.T>.... Colorado Ter.... 

168 Winchester, A. ^...Maryland Prof. F. Donaldson. 

169 Winterson, C. l\ .... Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

170 WoMBLE, J. G Maryland Profs. Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 

171 Wood, R. v., 'M..D....Mai'yland 

:72 WORTHiNGro:>f, J. W.3/ar2/Zand Prof^^ Chisolm, Miles and De Rosset. 






Jfame. Residence. 

C. A. BALDWIN. Ji'. Maryland 

F. E. BALTZELL MARYLAND 

C. F. BEVAN^ Maryland 

W. B. BOWEX.V Virginia 

J. F. BOWIE..* Virginia 

W. A. BOYLESTON Louisiana 

J. R. BROMWELL, ...MARYLAND 

J. M. COCKRILL Maryland 

J. T. DAWSON > Maryland 

A.C.DUKES./ South Carolina 

X. M. FEREBEEJ North Carolina 

G.F.GREEN.*-; '. Georgia 

H.W.GREGG.; Virginia 

H. B. GROSS.* Maryland 

J. F. HARKER^ Maryland 

J. W. HARKINS; Maryland 

J. S. HILL ; Alabama 

J. R. B. HOSKINSi.. Virginia 

R. M. HULTZ.^.^ Maryland" 

W. R. JAEGER J. Maryland 

J. G. JAY.* Maryland 

J. A. JOHNSON 4- Maryland 

F. E. JONES- Mississitpi 

.I.N.JONES Georgia 

J. W. S. JORDON Maryland 

B. F. KELLER-: Maryland 

C. H. K RISE .^. Pennsylyan i a 

R. H. LEWIS.,. North Carolina 

A.R.J. LISH.- Maryland 

J. E. MASSEY.,' South Carolina 

C. A. Mccormick. Maryland 

P. L. MURPHY;... Nokth Carolina 

W. H. W. NORRIS.* Maryland 

W.H. O'NEAL.. Pennsylyania 

W. H. PAGE Georgia 

G.W.PAPE* Maryland 

W. W. PARVIs./v Delaware 

9 



18 

Name. Residence. 

F. PENDLETON . 1 Virginia 

D.J. REINHART^ MaryXAND 

D. McG. SHIPLEY.: Makylanb 

L.V.SIMS South Carolina 

M.TAYLOR MARYI.AKD 

a. G.THOMAS. North Carolina 

H. TONGTE Maryland 

.1. P. VAN BIBBER Maryland 

G. M. WALLACE.^ Virginia 

H. WxVLKER South Carolina 

H. F. WARE.. Maryland 

C. H. WATERS.: ....Maryland 

\V. W.WILEY/. Maryland 

C. R. WINTERSON/. Maryland 

J. G. AVOMBLEI Maryland 



Dr. J. WALKER, of San Francisco, California. 



FEES, STATUTES, &c, 



The next Session will begin on Monday, the 2d October, 
1871, and will close about the 1st March, 1872. 

Tickets for one or any number of the Departments may be 
taken out separately. 

The Fees for attendance on the complete Course of Lectures 
will be $126. 

Practical Anatomy/ - - - $10 00 
Matriculation Fee, _ _ _ 5 00 

Graduation Fee, - - - - 20 00 

In accordance with action of the Legislature, one beneficiary 
student will be received from each Senatorial District of the 
State. Application for these scholarships must be made to the 
respective Senators of the various Districts of the State of Man- 
land. State Beneficiaries will be charged MatricuLation, Prac- 
tical Anatomy and Graduation Fees only. 

STATUTES. 

1. P^very student attending Lectures, nuist matriculate and 
pay the regular fee, which is five dollars. The matriculation 
and lecture tickets must be taken out at the commencement of 
the session. 

2. The matriculation ticket must be countersigned by the 
Professors upon wdiose Lectures the students may attcnrl, and 
exhibited to the Janitor when required. 



20 

3. Candidates for graduation must have attended two full 
Courses of Lectures in this School, or one in this after one in 
some other respectable Medical school. 

4. Every candidate must deposit with the Dean of the 
Faculty, on or before the 14th day of February, a Thesis of 
his own composition on some subject connected with medical 
science^ or a clinical report of not less than six cases of disease, 
drawn up from his own observation. Xo Thesis will be re- 
ceived after the time specified above, but by a special vote of 
the Faculty. 

5. Every candidate must appear before the Faculty for ex- 
amination on the various branches of Medicine taught in this 
School. He must also produce evidence of attendance, during 
one session, on Practical Anatomy and on Clinical Medicine. 

6. The graduation fee, which ie twenty dollars, must be de- 
posited with the Treasurer before the candidate can be admitted 
to examination. 

7. The result of an examination is determined by a majority 
of the votes of the Faculty. 

8. The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candi- 
date is based upon their knowledge of his general attendance 
and industry, character and habits, as well as uj)on the result 
of his final examination. 

The Facult}', therefore, wish it to be distinctly understood 
that while any student vrho has complied with the technical re- 
quisitions, viz: matriculation, attendance upon Lectures, and 
the de2)osit of a Thesis, may appear before them for examina- 
tion, they reserve to themselves and will exercise the right of 
making moral as well as intellectual qualifications an element 
of their decision. 

Open irregularity of conduct, negligence, habitual and pro- 
longed absence from Lectures, will always be regarded as ob- 
stacles to obtaining a degree. 

9. The dissecting room will be open daily, Simdai/8 excepted. 



21 

A number of students will be appointed on the 1st Marcli 
of each year as Clinical Assistants. The fee for Hospital resi- 
dence is one hiaulred dollars per yeai'^ payable in advance. 
This covers lod^ino; licrht and fuel. 

For further intbrmation apply to 

J. J. CHISOI.M, Dean of the Faculty, 

Kesidencp, 64 Franklin Street, Baltimore, Mel. 



Jd-^ 3Ir. Peter fSnu't.h, tha Janitor, who may he found at his house 
on the University grou/nds, i\^. JE. corner of Green and Lombard 
streets, will famish (jentlenun iritli a list of comfortahle and conve- 
nient hoarding houses to suit the wishes and means of students. Tlic 
expenses of living are as low in Baltimore as in any city in the 
United States — hoard heing obtained as low as §4 j^er week, and ex- 
cellent bo((rd at from %b to %1 . 



TEXT BOOKS. 



AxATOMV.— tSJuu'pey and Qtiaiii; Gray's Anatomy, Wilson's Anatomy. 

Surgery.— Dmitt's Surgery, Ericbsen's Surgery. 

Che.mistry and Pharmacy. — Fownes' Chemistry, liloxham's Clicmistry, 
Parrish's Practical Pharmacy. 

Obstetrics. — Cazeaux's, Churcliill's, Bedford's Midwifery. 

Principles and Prac^tice of Medicine. — Flint's Practice, Niemeycr's 
Practice. 

Materia Meuica and Thkrapeltics — II. S. nispcnsator3% Wood's 
Therapeutics, Pci-eira's Materia Medica. 

Physiology and Hygiene. — Todd &:. BowmaiTs Physiological Anatomy-, 
Dalton's Physiology, Flint's Physiology. 

Diseases of Women and Children — Thomas on Diseases of Women ; 
J. Lewis Smith on Diseases of Infancy and Childhood. 

Works on Special Subjects. — Bumstead on Venereal Diseases ; Flint 
on Diseases of Lungs and Heart ; Tobold on Diseases of the Throat ; Mac- 
kenzie on the Laryngoscope ; Wells on Diseases of the Eye ; Troeltscli on 
the Disespox of the Ear. 



OFFICEHS OF THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 



Resident Physician J. S. CONRAD, M. D. 

Olinical Clerk J. S. HILL, M. D. 

\ A. E. STEIN, M. D. 

Dispensary Physicians... V E. F. WALKER, M. D. 

3 W. W. WHITE, M. D. 

Sister Superior SISTER HILARY. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS. 

FOR 1870. 

C. A. BALDWIN North Carolina. 

F. E. BALTZELL Maryland. 

J. M. COCKRILL Maryland. 

N. M. FEREBEE Korth Carolina. 

JOHN S. HILL Alabama. 

J. G. JAY Maryland. 

B. T. KELLER Maryland. 

A. R. J. LISH Maryland. 

C. H. STREET Marylmid. 

H. TONGUE Maryland. 

L. P. VAIDEN Alabama. 

H. WARE Maryland. 

W. W. WILEY Maryland. 

FOR 1871. 

WILLIAM BOONE Maryland. 

E. GEORGE Maryland. 

G. E. HARMON Dclaicarc. 

S. P. HOWELL Indian Territory. 

W. H. JAMES Maryland. 

W. F. A. KEMP MarTjland. 

R. H. LEWIS, M.D North Carolina. 

J. R. McCLEARY Viryinia. 

W. H. W. NORRIS, M. D Maryland. 

H. J. RAY 3Iississippi. 

T. H. SKINNER Tennessee. 

J. S. STONE Maryland. 

S. TINGES , Marylajid. 

J. A. WATSON South Carolina. 

W. L. WAYSON Maryland. 



:he BEST and the CHEAPEST ! 

THE 

Practitioner 

S- NOTE THE REDUCTION IN PRICE. 

The Practitioner, a Monthly Journal of Therapeutics, 

EDITED BY FRANCIS E. ANSTIE, M. D., F. R. C. P. 
Senior Assistant J'hysician to Westminster Hospital. 

most popular and successful Medical Journal now before the profession. It is printed on fine 
paper, from new type, and is excelled by no Medical Journal in the excellence of its 
mechanical execution. 

ilNGLE COPIES 30 Cents. THREE DOLLARS PER ANNUM, in advance. 

Owing to the substantial success which has attended the republication of the Practitioner, the 
lishers beg to announce the reduction in price of their reprint of this popular English Journal, 
same to take effect with the new volume, which commences with the July number. 
The Practitioner is considered one of the very best of the English Medical Journals that has 
r been issued, and its large circulation in this country, is an evidence of its popularity among 
American Practitioners. 

I'he Pkactitioner will appear monthly, and will thus supply the most recent information ob- 

ed on all sul)jects connected with the applicatio^i of remedies for disease, and as its bulk of 

ter will not be great, it is hoped that business men will master its contents without difflcultj'. 

The Editor hopes to supply the Medical Practitioners of tliis country the same kind of informa- 

which is widely disseminated in France, Germany and Italy by periodicals which are either 

rely devoted, or accord a large space, to papers on the practical treatment of disease. 

Each number will contain (H pages of reading matter, embracing a series of short original arti- 

upon important special subjects in Therapeutics; a brief resume of the more interesting 

s of treatment recorded in tlie foreign .iournals ; short reviews of important works bearing 

reatment; a brief sketch of Practical Medicine for the month, as observed in the London 

provi